Tag Archives: Sonata form

Historic Musical Bits: Mischa Maisky & Martha Argerich – Debussy: Cello Sonata , great compositions/performances


Mischa Maisky & Martha Argerich – Debussy: Cello Sonata

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Cello Sonata is a late work by the French composer Claude Debussy. It was the first of a planned series of ‘Six sonates pour divers instruments’, however Debussy only completed two others, the sonata for violin and the sonata for flute, viola and harp. The sonata for cello and piano was written in 1915, and is notable for its brevity, most performances not exceeding 11 minutes. It is a staple of the modern cello repertoire and is commonly regarded as one of the finest masterpieces written for the instrument.[1]

It is divided into three short movements:

  • I. Prologue: Lent, sostenuto e molto risoluto
  • II. Sérénade: Modérément animé
  • III. Finale: Animé, léger et nerveux

The two final movements are joined by an attacca. Instead of sonata form, Debussy structures the piece in the style of the eighteenth-century monothematic sonata, and was particularly influenced by the music of François Couperin.

The piece makes use of modes and whole-tone and pentatonic scales, as is typical of Debussy’s style. It also utilises many types of extended cello technique, including left-hand pizzicato, spiccato and flautando bowing, false harmonics and portamenti. Not surprisingly, the piece is considered technically demanding.

Whether descriptive comments related to characters of the Commedia dell’arte were actually given by Debussy to cellist Louis Rosoor remains unclear

 

Wieniawski-Violin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22: great compositions/performances


WieniawskiViolin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22

MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUOR LIFE SERIES: Symphony No.3 in D-major, D.200 (1815)


[youtube.com/watch?v=FLlKgu1sx4s]

Franz Schubert – Symphony No.3 in D-major, D.200 (1815)

Picture: Carlo Bossoli – Paris Bourse

Mov.I: Adagio maestoso – Allegro con brio 00:00
Mov.II: Allegretto 09:35
Mov.III: Menuetto: Vivace 13:54
Mov.IV: Presto vivace 18:04

Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra

Conductor: Michael Halász

The Allegro con brio, which follows a broad introduction in a form which reminds us of the French Overture in two parts, the first slow and dramatic, the second more lyrical, is remarkable for its charm and the interplay of solo clarinet with syncopated strings, which developed pp from within the bounds of the style of chamber music to the larger sphere of the symphonic form. This is an extremely dramatic movement in sonata form. It owes much, as Michael Trapp points out in the liner notes of Günter Wand’s recording, to the influence of Rossini, whose music was quite popular at the time, particularly evident in the overture-like structure.

A delightful Allegretto in ternary form follows, full of grace and humor.

Then comes a high-spirited Minuet, which, with its accented up-beats, suggests a scherzo and a popular flavor due to this low and popular gesture, and is contrasted by a graceful Ländler-like trio.

The concluding Presto in tarantella rhythm is remarkable for its bold harmonic progressions and for its wealth of dynamic contrast. This movement is in sonata form with a looser conception.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart: Symphony No.29 – André Previn Wiener Philharmoniker(2000Live)


[youtube.com/watch?v=sXMRimMFV7M]

Mozart: Symphony No.29André Previn Wiener Philharmoniker (2000Live)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
Symphony No.29 in A major, K.201
André Previn
Wiener Philharmoniker
Festspielhaus, Salzburg, 28 1/2000

The Symphony No. 29 in A major, K. 201/186a, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on 6 April 1774.[1] It is, along with Symphony No. 25, one of his better known early symphonies. Stanley Sadie characterizes it as “a landmark … personal in tone, indeed perhaps more individual in its combination of an intimate, chamber music style with a still fiery and impulsive manner.”[2]

Structure

The symphony is scored for 2 oboes, 2 horns and strings, as was typical of early-period Mozart symphonies.

There are four movements:

  1. Allegro moderato, 2/2
  2. Andante, 2/4
  3. Menuetto: Allegretto – Trio, 3/4
  4. Allegro con spirito, 6/8

The first movement is in sonata form, with a graceful principal theme characterized by an octave drop and ambitious horn passages. The second movement is scored for muted strings with limited use of the winds, and is also in sonata form. The third movement, a minuet, is characterized by nervous dotted rhythms and staccato phrases; the trio provides a more graceful contrast. The energetic last movement, another sonata-form movement in 6/8 time, connects back to the first movement with its octave drop in the main theme.

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 20 in C, K.303


[youtube.com/watch?v=9Yt97xhurk8]

Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 20 in C, K.303

I. Adagio – Molto allegro [0:00]
II. Tempo di Menuetto [5:04]

Sigiswald Kuijken, violin
Luc Devos, fortepiano

performed on period instruments

Painting of Mozart family by Johann Nepomuk della Croce

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 22, K. 305


[youtube.com/watch?v=XEkIwkg_HoY]
Violin Sonata No. 22 in A major, K. 305 (293d) is a work composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in Mannheim 1778. There are two movements:
0:00 1. Allegro di molto
4:53 2. Tema. Andante grazioso – Variations I-V – Variation VI. Allegro
The first movement is in sonata form. This movement has one of the bounciest happiest melodies to be found in his violin sonatas. The second movement is in a theme and variations form. This movement is more somber than the opening movement, being at a slower tempo and having a more subdued melody.

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Brahms, Symphony Nr 3 F Dur op 90 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker


From Wikipedia:

The Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90, is a symphony by Johannes Brahms. The work was written in the summer of 1883 at Wiesbaden, nearly six years after he completed his Second Symphony. In the interim Brahms had written some of his greatest works, including the Violin Concerto, two overtures (Tragic Overture and Academic Festival Overture), and the Second Piano Concerto.

The premiere performance was given on 2 December 1883 by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, under the direction of Hans Richter. The shortest of Brahms’ four symphonies, a typical performance lasts between 30 and 40 minutes.

Instrumentation

The symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, a contrabassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombonestimpani, and strings.

Form

The symphony consists of four movements, marked as follows:

  1. Allegro con brio (F major), in sonata form.
  2. Andante (C major), in a modified sonata form.
  3. Poco allegretto (C minor), in ternary form (A B A’).
  4. Allegro (F minor/F major), in a modified sonata form.

History

Hans Richter, who conducted the premiere of the symphony, proclaimed it to be Brahms’ Eroica. The symphony was well received, more so than his Second Symphony. Although Richard Wagner had died earlier that year, the public feud between Brahms and Wagner had not yet subsided. Wagner enthusiasts tried to interfere with the symphony’s premiere, and the conflict between the two factions nearly brought about a duel.[1]

After each performance, Brahms polished his score further, until it was published in May 1884. His friend and influential music critic Eduard Hanslick said, “Many music lovers will prefer the titanic force of the First Symphony; others, the untroubled charm of the Second, but the Third strikes me as being artistically the most nearly perfect.”[1]

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Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Minor D845, Op.42


The Piano Sonata in A minor, D. 845 (Op. 42) by Franz Schubert is a sonata for solo piano, composed in May 1825.

Piano Sonata in A Minor D845: 

I. Moderato, A minor 00:00

II. Andante poco moto, C major. (4 measures missing after measure 43) 8:06

III. Scherzo: Allegro vivace – Trio: Un poco più lento, A minor 17:13

IV. Rondo: Allegro vivace, A minor 23:58

The first movement is in sonata form though with ambiguity over the material in the development and the beginning of the recapitulation.[1]

The second movement is in variation form. Noted performers of the work in the 19th century included Hans von Bülow, who played the sonata in both Europe and the USA.[2]

Daniel Coren has discussed the nature of the recapitulation in the first movement of this sonata.[3]

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Mozart – Symphony No. 29 in A, K. 201



The Symphony No. 29 in A major, K. 201/186a, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on 6 April 1774. It is, along with Symphony No. 25, one of his better known early symphonies. Stanley Sadie characterizes it as “a landmark … personal in tone, indeed perhaps more individual in its combination of an intimate, chamber music style with a still fiery and impulsive manner.” The symphony is scored for 2 oboes, 2 horns and strings, as was typical of early-period Mozart symphonies.
There are four movements:
1. Allegro moderato, 2/2
2. Andante, 2/4
3. Menuetto: Allegretto — Trio, 3/4
4. Allegro con spirito, 6/8
The first movement is in sonata form, with a graceful principal theme characterized by an octave drop and ambitious horn passages. The second movement is scored for muted strings with limited use of the winds, and is also in sonata form. The third movement, a minuet, is characterized by nervous dotted rhythms and staccato phrases; the trio provides a more graceful contrast. The energetic last movement, another sonata-form movement in 6/8 time, connects back to the first movement with its octave drop in the main them

 

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Maurice Ravel – Introduction & Allegro for Harp, Flute, Clarinet & String Quartet



Introduction & Allegro for harp, flute, clarinet & string quartet (1905)

Stuttgart Chamber Music Ensemble

The Introduction and Allegro (1905) is one of the few pieces by Ravel that has remained more or less in the shadows — save in the minds of harpists — throughout the last century. While it is certainly not among the composer’s most striking works, it is nevertheless a pleasant enough showpiece that looks forward to the raw sensuality of Daphnis et Chloé while hearkening back with great affection to the music of Chabrier and, especially, Franck. The full title of the work is Introduction and Allegro for Harp, Accompanied by a Quartet of Strings, Flute, and Clarinet. Although it is often conveniently designated a septet, it is really a kind of miniature (10-minute) harp concerto, complete with virtuoso writing and an extended central cadenza for the instrument. Chamber performances of the work, in fact, are few and far between; it is far more frequently heard in the orchestra hall with a full complement of strings. The general simplicity of form and harmony have led some to conclude that the Introduction and Allegro might have originally been composed as a test piece for the Paris Conservatoire; certainly it did not stand out sufficiently in Ravel’s own memory for him to include it in his list of works. 

The brief Très lent introduction presents two themes, the first for the woodwinds in leaping parallel thirds, the second an inverted-arch-shaped gesture sung by the strings in octaves. Presently a shimmering texture of arpeggios and woodwind double-tonguing takes over, inviting the cello to explore another melody before the harp rejoins the lush musical fabric. 

Twenty-six bars into the piece the Allegro commences. Now, as the harp makes an extended solo exploration of the melody presented earlier by the strings, a sonata form begins to take shape. A second, hemiola-ridden theme arrives in the woodwinds, accompanied pizzicato by the strings. The development of this material takes place in the usual fragmentary manner, building to an excited fff climax that breaks away abruptly as the harp assumes center stage with a cadenza. The recapitulation is quite straightforward, and the work ends without extensive fireworks or bombast of any kind. The Introduction and Allegro was first performed in late February 1907. [allmusic.com]

Art by Jean-Léon Gérôme

 

Mozart – Symphony No. 29 in A, K. 201



The Symphony No. 29 in A major, K. 201/186a, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on 6 April 1774. It is, along with Symphony No. 25, one of his better known early symphonies. Stanley Sadie characterizes it as “a landmark … personal in tone, indeed perhaps more individual in its combination of an intimate, chamber music style with a still fiery and impulsive manner.” The symphony is scored for 2 oboes, 2 horns and strings, as was typical of early-period Mozart symphonies.
There are four movements:
1. Allegro moderato, 2/2
2. Andante, 2/4
3. Menuetto: Allegretto — Trio, 3/4
4. Allegro con spirito, 6/8
The first movement is in sonata form, with a graceful principal theme characterized by an octave drop and ambitious horn passages. The second movement is scored for muted strings with limited use of the winds, and is also in sonata form. The third movement, a minuet, is characterized by nervous dotted rhythms and staccato phrases; the trio provides a more graceful contrast. The energetic last movement, another sonata-form movement in 6/8 time, connects back to the first movement with its octave drop in the main theme. 
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

 

Mozart – Piano Sonata No. 16 in C, K. 545 (Facile)



The Piano Sonata No. 16 in C major, K. 545, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was described by Mozart himself in his own thematic catalogue as “for beginners,” and it is sometimes known by the nickname Sonata facile or Sonata semplice. Mozart added the work to his catalogue on June 26, 1788, the same date as his Symphony No. 39. The exact circumstances of the work’s composition are not known, however. Although the piece is well-known today, it was not published in Mozart’s lifetime and first appeared in print in 1805. A typical performance takes about 14 minutes. The work has three movements:
1. Allegro
2. Andante
3. Rondo
The first movement is written in sonata form and is in the key of C major. The familiar opening theme is accompanied by an Alberti bass, played in the left hand.
A bridge passage composed of scales follows, arriving at a cadence in G major, the key in which the second theme is then played. A codetta follows to conclude the exposition, then the exposition is repeated. The development starts in G minor and modulates through several keys. The recapitulation begins, unusually, in the subdominant key of F major. According to Charles Rosen, the practice of beginning a recapitulation in the subdominant was “rare at the time [the sonata] was written,” though the practice was later taken up by Franz Schubert. The second movement is in the key of G major, the dominant key of C major. The music modulates in the middle of this movement to the parallel minor (G minor) and its relative major (B-flat major). The movement then modulates to the tonic, and, after the main theme and development is heard again, ends.
The third movement is in rondo form and is in the tonic key, C major. The first theme is lively and sets the mood of the piece. The second theme is in G major and contains an Alberti bass in the left hand. The first theme appears again and is followed by a third theme. The third theme is in a minor key and modulates through many different keys before modulating into C major. The first theme appears again followed by a coda and finally ends in C major.
The finale was transcribed to F major and collected with a solo piano arrangement of the second movement of the violin sonata in F major to form the Piano Sonata in F major, K. 547a.
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

 

J. Haydn – Symphony No. 6 in D major ‘La Matin’



Composer: Joseph Haydn (1732 – 1809).
Symphony No. 6 in D major Hob I/6 (1762):

1. Adagio-Allegro: 0:00
2. Adagio-Andante-Adagio: 5:46
3. Menuet & Trio: 13:38
4. Finale, Allegro: 18:10

By The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra.

 

Great Performances: ANTONIN DVORÁK – SINFONIE NO. 8 IN G-DUR OP. 88 – WIENER PHILHARMONIKER – HERBERT VON KARAJAN



I. Allegro con brio[0:06]
II. Adagio – [9:57]
III. Allegretto grazioso, molto vivace – [21:28]
IV. Allegro ma non troppo – [27:05]
Wiener Philharmoniker – 
Herbert von Karajan, Leitung –
Großer Musikvereinssaal Wien
Januar/Februar 1985

 

Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 35 in A, K.526



I. Molto allegro [0:00]
II. Andante [9:30]
III. Presto [19:50]

Sigiswald Kuijken, violin
Luc Devos, fortepiano

performed on period instruments

Painting of Mozart by Barbara Krafft

 

Schubert Symphony No 3 D major Maazel Bavarian RSO


Franz Schubert‘s Symphony No. 3 in D major, D. 200, was written between 24 May and 19 July 1815, a few months after his eighteenth birthday. The length of thissymphony is approximately 21–23 minutes. It is in four movements:

The Allegro con brio, which follows a broad introduction in a form which reminds us of the French Overture in two parts, the first slow and dramatic, the second more lyrical, is remarkable for its charm and the interplay of solo clarinet with syncopated strings, which developed pp from within the bounds of the style of chamber music to the larger sphere of the symphonic form. This is an extremely dramatic movement in sonata form. It owes much, as Michael Trapp points out in the liner notes of Günter Wand‘s recording, to the influence of Rossini, whose music was quite popular at the time, particularly evident in the overture-like structure.

A delightful Allegretto in ternary form follows, full of grace and humor.

 

DAVORIN DOLINŠEK and POPV perform LEROY ANDERSON: PIANO CONCERTO IN C (Slovenian premiere!)



Concert of POPV – Symphonic Wind Orchestra of Premogovnik Velenje, 8.12.2012
Conductor: Matjaž Emeršič
Soloist: Davorin Dolinšek

Leroy Anderson: Concert for Piano and Orchestra in C major
Allegro Moderato [Cadenza I: at 7’39”]
Andante-Allegretto (starts at 8’35”)
Allegro Vivo (starts at 14’16”) [Cadenza II: at 18’40”]

 

Gioachino Rossini – Sonata No. 5 in E flat major



Andras Kiss, violin. Budapest Rossini Ensemble.
Gioachino Rossini – Sonata No. 5 in E flat major
I. Allegro vivace 00:12:00
II. Andante 00:04:54
III. Allegretto 00:03:39

 

Mozart – String Quartet No. 15 in D minor, K. 421 / K. 417b



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart‘s String Quartet No. 15 in D minor K. 421/417b, the second of the Quartets dedicated to Haydn and the only one of the set in a minor key, is believed to have been completed in 1783. The quartet is, however, undated in the autograph. It is in four movements:
1. Allegro moderato
2. Andante (F major)
3. Menuetto and Trio (the latter in D major). Allegretto
4. Allegretto ma non troppo
The first movement is characterized by a sharp contrast between the aperiodicity of the first subject group, characterized by Arnold Schoenberg as “prose-like,” and the “wholly periodic” second subject group. In the Andante and the Minuet, “normal expectations of phraseology are confounded.” The main part of the Minuet is in minuet sonata form, while “the contrasting major-mode Trio … is … almost embarrassingly lightweight on its own … [but] makes a wonderful foil to the darker character of the Minuet.” The last movement is a set of variations. 

 

Beethoven- Piano Sonata No. 9 in E major, Op. 14 No. 1 Piano – Richard Goode



00:00 – Allegro
06:40 – Allegretto 
10:25 – Rondo – Allegro comodo

Richard Goode, 1993

 

Mozart – Violin Concerto No. 3 in G, K. 216



The Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216, was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in Salzburg in 1775. Mozart was only 19 at the time. The piece is in three movements:
1. Allegro
2. Adagio
and 3. Rondeau, Allegro.
The Allegro is in sonata form, opening with a brilliant G major theme, played by the orchestra. The main theme is a bright and happy discussion between the solo violin and the accompanist, followed by a modulation to the dominant D major, then its parallel key D minor. It experiments in other keys but does not settle and eventually heads back to the tonic, G major, in the recapitulation with the help of the cadenza. Continue reading

Mozart – Violin Concerto No. 3 in G, K. 216



The Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216, was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in Salzburg in 1775. Mozart was only 19 at the time. The piece is in three movements:
1. Allegro
2. Adagio
and 3. Rondeau, Allegro.
The Allegro is in sonata form, opening with a brilliant G major theme, played by the orchestra. The main theme is a bright and happy discussion between the solo violin and the accompanist, followed by a modulation to the dominant D major, then its parallel key D minor. It experiments in other keys but does not settle and eventually heads back to the tonic, G major, in the recapitulation with the help of the cadenza. Continue reading

Sviatoslav Richter – Haydn – Piano Sonata No 32 in B minor, Hob XVI-32


 

 

Mozart – Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216



The Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216, was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in Salzburg in 1775. Mozart was only 19 at the time. The piece is in three movements:
1. Allegro
2. Adagio
and 3. Rondeau, Allegro.
The Allegro is in sonata form, opening with a brilliant G major theme, played by the orchestra. The main theme is a bright and happy discussion between the solo violin and the accompanist, followed by a modulation to the dominant D major, then its parallel key D minor. It experiments in other keys but does not settle and eventually heads back to the tonic, G major, in the recapitulation with the help of the cadenza.
The second movement is also in ternary form form, and in the dominant key of D major. The orchestra begins by playing the well known and beautiful main theme, which the violin imitates one octave higher. The winds then play a dance-like motif in A major, which the violin concludes by its own. After a conclusion in A, the violin plays the main theme again, remaining in the same key. When it should have sounded A natural, it sounds A sharp, and the melody switches to B minor, in a fairly tragic passage. It soon modulates back to A major, and to the home key of D major through the main theme. After the cadenza, and in a quite unusual thing for Mozart to do, the violin plays the main theme again, thus concluding the movement in D.
The third movement is a Rondeau Allegro, and opens with an orchestra theme which gave the concerto its nickname: “Straßburg“. After a lonely, short passage by the oboes only, the solo violin enters with a different melody which modulates to D. A brilliant and high passage in D is soon followed by a descending arpeggio-like melodic line which eventually leads to the G string and repeats itself. After the second time, the violin plays the lonely oboe line from the introduction. A chromatic scale then leads to the “Straßburg” theme with the violin playing. The orchestra imitates the violin and abruptly changes to B minor and a B minor violin theme: exactly the same theme as in the first violin solo, played in the relative minor key. As the theme itself repeats, it once again abruptly changes to E minor. The small E minor cadenza introduces the orchestra, which once again plays the “Straßburg” theme in G major. After a couple of bars in D major by the orchestra, the music goes from Allegro to an Andante in G minor, almost in the fashion of a scherzo-trio form. The strings play saltando quavers while the violin plays a note-rest small melodic line which repeats itself and eventually leads to a G major Allegretto. The violin plays a crotchet-only playful theme, while the orchestra plays brilliant and fast threesome up-and-down notes, in a way that the solo violin’s part acts as a background only. The parts switch and now the orchestra plays the playful theme, while the violin gets to show off by playing fast notes. The quick passages stop for the violin to play a more ceremonial theme played on the D and A strings, in the fashion of a Musette. This pattern sounds two more times until the violin concludes the fast theme with a low G, and switches to Tempo 1. After a few bars, the first solo theme that the violin played is played as a variation in A minor. The violin plays the “Straßburg” theme in G minor, and the orchestra imitates it in the usual form of G major. After the typical first solo variation, this time in the tonic key. The violin plays another small cadenza which leads to the last “Straßburg” theme played in two octaves. The orchestra plays it one third time in the lower octave. Instead of ending the concerto in a pompous way, Mozart chose to end it instead with the lonely oboe theme in G major played piano, adding the feeling of a musical “disappearing”.

 

Mozart – Symphony No. 36 in C, K. 425, ‘Linz’


The Symphony No. 36 in C major, KV 425, (known as the Linz Symphony) was written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart during a stopover in the Austrian town of Linz on his and his wife’s way back home to Vienna from Salzburg in late 1783. The entire symphony was written in four days to accommodate the local count’s announcement, upon hearing of the Mozarts’ arrival in Linz, of a concert. The première in Linz took place on 4 November, 1783. The composition was also premièred in Vienna on 1 April, 1784. The autograph score of the “Linz Symphony” was not preserved. The symphony is scored for 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani and strings. There are four movements:
1. Adagio, 3/4 — Allegro spiritoso, 4/4
2. Poco adagio, 6/8
3. Menuetto, 3/4
4. Finale (Presto), 2/4.
Continue reading

Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 23 in A, K. 488



The Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major (K. 488) is a musical composition for piano and orchestra written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. It was finished, according to Mozart’s own catalogue, on March 2, 1786, around the time of the premiere of his opera, The Marriage of Figaro. It was one of three subscription concerts given that spring and was probably played by Mozart himself at one of these. The concerto is scored for piano solo and an orchestra consisting of one flute, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns and strings. In Mozart’s later works the wind instruments are equal to the stringed instruments, and this is also the case in this concerto. It has three movements:
1. Allegro in A major and common time.
2. Adagio in F-sharp minor and 6/8 time (in later editions, the tempo is listed as Andante).
3. Allegro assai in A and alla breve (in later editions, the tempo is listed as Presto). In Rondo form.
The first movement is mostly sunny and positive with the occasional melancholic touches typical of Mozart pieces in A major and is in sonata form. The piece begins with a double exposition, the first played by the orchestra, and the second when the piano joins in. Continue reading

Thursday Afternoon at the Concert: Annie Fischer plays Beethoven – Piano Sonata 18, Op.31, No.3 “The Hunt” (Color-Coded Analysis)


Piano Sonata No. 18 in E-flat major, Op. 31, No. 3 (1802)
I.Allegro @0:00
II.Scherzo. Allegretto vivace @8:00
III.Menuetto. Moderato e grazioso @12:54
IV.Presto con fuoco @16:58

Piano: Annie Fischer

For more videos of this type see:
Color-Coded Analysis of Beethoven‘s Music (INDEX):
http://lvbandmore.blogspot.com/p/simple-visual-breakdowns-of-works.html

Introduction to Sonata Form:
http://lvbandmore.blogspot.com/p/about-sonata-form-and-analysis.html

This analysis was assisted in large part by Donald Tovey‘s “Companion to Beethoven’s Pianoforte Sonatas”.

Mozart Symphony No 41 C major ‘Jupiter’ N Harnoncourt Wiener Philarmoniker


 


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart completed his Symphony No. 41 in C majorK. 551, on 10 August 1788.[1] It was the last symphony that he composed.

The work is nicknamed the Jupiter Symphony. This name stems not from Mozart but rather was likely coined by the impresario Johann Peter Salomon[2] in an early arrangement for piano.

The four movements are arranged in the traditional symphonic form of the Classical era:

  1. Allegro vivace, 4/4
  2. Andante cantabile, 3/4 in F major
  3. MenuettoAllegretto – Trio, 3/4
  4. Molto allegro, 2/2

The sonata form first movement’s main theme begins with contrasting motifs: a threefold tutti outburst on the fundamental tone (respectively, by an ascending motion leading in a triplet from the dominant tone underneath to the fundamental one), followed by a more lyrical response.

This exchange is heard twice and then followed by an extended series of fanfares. What follows is a transitional passage where the two contrasting motifs are expanded and developed. From there, the second theme group begins with a lyrical section in G major which ends suspended on a seventh chord and is followed by a stormy section in C minor.    More…

 

Mozart Symphony no. 38, in D Major, K. 504 ‘Prague Symphony’


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 38 in D major, K. 504, was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in late 1786. It was premiered in Prague on January 19, 1787, a few weeks after Le nozze di Figaro opened there. It is popularly known as the Prague Symphony. Mozart’s autograph thematic catalogue bears December 6, 1786, as the date of composition. Other works written by Mozart about contemporary with this symphony include the twenty-fifth piano concerto and the piano trio in B-flat (K. 503 and K. 502, respectively) the former also written in December 1786, the latter written in November. The aria scena and rondo Ch’io mi scordi di te? K.505 for soprano and orchestra with piano obligato, regarded by Girdlestone in his book on Mozart and his Piano Concertos as a work on the same level, also dates from the same period. This work would be called No. 37 if the K. 444 work (mostly by Michael Haydn, except for the slow introduction, which is by Mozart) was removed from the numbering. The early classical symphony of the 18th century would either have three movements or four (or one movement in three recognizable sections, like the 26th or the 32nd), the four-movement symphonies having a minuet in addition.

By the time Mozart wrote his Prague symphony, however, the symphony was no longer a step away from the opera overture, no longer bound to this tradition, so that the symphony without a minuet could be, and was, similar in weight to his other symphonies, different mostly in the lack of that minuet and not in overall specific gravity. The Prague Symphony was scored for two flutes, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings. The work has the following three movements:

  • 1. Adagio—Allegro, 4/4 (Sonata form)
  • 2. Andante in G major, 6/8 (Sonata form)
  • 3. Finale (Presto), 2/4.

Although Mozart’s popularity among the Viennese waxed and waned, he was consistently popular among the Bohemians and had a devoted following in Prague. A piece appearing in the Prager Neue Zeitung shortly after Mozart’s death expresses this sentiment:

“Mozart seems to have written for the people of Bohemia, his music is understood nowhere better than in Prague, and even in the countryside it is widely loved.”
The Prague Symphony was written in   gratitude for their high esteem.

Mozart – Symphony No. 36 in C, K V 425 (Linz)


Linz by night

Linz by night (Photo credit: uitdragerij)


The Symphony No. 36 in C major, KV 425, (known as the Linz Symphony) was written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart during a stopover in the Austrian town of Linz on his and his wife’s way back home to Vienna from Salzburg in late 1783. The entire symphony was written in four days to accommodate the local count’s announcement, upon hearing of the Mozarts’ arrival in Linz, of a concert. The première in Linz took place on 4 November, 1783. The composition was also premièred in Vienna on 1 April, 1784. The autograph score of the “Linz Symphony” was not preserved. The symphony is scored for 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani and strings. There are four movements:
1. Adagio, 3/4 — Allegro spiritoso, 4/4
2. Poco adagio, 6/8
3. Menuetto, 3/4
4. Finale (Presto), 2/4.
Every movement except the minuet is in sonata form. The slow movement has a siciliano character and meter which was rare in Mozart’s earlier symphonies (only used in one of the slow movements of the “Paris“) but would appear frequently in later works such as #38 and #40. The next symphony by Mozart is Symphony No. 38. The work known as “Symphony No. 37” is mostly by Michael Haydn.  

Franz Schubert’s Symphony No. 3 in D major – the Wiener Philharmonic Orchestra Conductor István Kertész


Franz Schubert‘s Symphony No. 3 in D major with István Kertész and the Wiener Philharmonic Orchestra

I. Adagio maestosoAllegro con brio
II. Allegretto  

III. Menuetto. Vivace

IV. Presto vivace

 Franz Schubert‘s Symphony No. 3 in D major, D. 200, was written between 24 May and 19 July 1815, a few months after his eighteenth birthday. The length of this symphony is approximately 21–23 minutes. It is in four movements:

  • I. Adagio maestoso — Allegro con brio
  • II. Allegretto in G major
  • III. Menuetto. Vivace
  • IV. Presto vivace

The Allegro con brio, which follows a broad introduction in a form which reminds us of the French Overture in two parts, the first slow and dramatic, the second more lyrical, is remarkable for its charm and the interplay of solo clarinet with syncopated strings, which developed pp from within the bounds of the style of chamber music to the larger sphere of the symphonic form. This is an extremely dramatic movement in sonata form.

A delightful Allegretto in ternary form follows, full of grace and humor.

Then comes a high-spirited Minuet, which, with its accented up-beats, suggests a scherzo and a popular flavor due to this low and popular gesture, and is contrasted by a graceful Ländler-like trio.

The concluding Presto in tarantella rhythm is remarkable for its bold harmonic progressions and for its wealth of dynamic contrast. This movement is in sonata form with a looser conception. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._3_(Schubert)

 

Conductor István Kertész (August 28, 1929 – April 16, 1973)
was a Hungarian orchestral and operatic conductor.

Kertész was born in Budapest, Hungary, in 1929, the first child of Margit Muresian and Miklós Kertész. His sister, Vera, was born four years later. Miklós Kertész, born in Szécsény, Hungary into a large Jewish family, and the director of a leather-works, died of appendicitis in 1938. An energetic, intellectually gifted woman, Margit Muresian Kertész went to work to support her family. Despite strictures against women working professionally in Hungarian society during the first half of the twentieth century, Margit was steadily promoted until she ran the office where she was employed. Kertész began violin lessons at the age of six. “When I was six” he told a High Fidelity interviewer for the December 1969 issue “and started music, it was 1935 and cruel things were going on in Europe… I found my `exile’ in music, practicing the piano, the fiddle, and writing little compositions. By the time he was twelve, Kertész began to study the piano as well.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Istv%C3%A1n_Kert%C3%A9sz_(conductor)

Shubert’s symphonies never failed to touch my spirit in a unique manner. Symphony No.3 is one of the most beautiful pieces of music ever composed, youthful, full of energy, vitality and hope.