Tag Archives: Spain

today’s holiday: Frost Saints’ Days


Frost Saints’ Days

These three consecutive days in May mark the feasts of St. Mammertus, St. Pancras, and St. Servatus. In the wine-growing districts of France, a severe cold spell occasionally strikes at this time of year, inflicting serious damage on the grapevines; some in rural France have believed that it is the result of their having offended one of the three saints, who for this reason are called the “frost saints.” French farmers have been known to show their displeasure over a cold snap at this time of year by flogging the statues and defacing the pictures of Mammertus, Pancras, and Servatus. More… Discuss

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Itzhak Perlman – Sarasate, Spanish Dances op.22 no.1 Romanza Andaluza

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

April 14

1471   The Earl of Warwick, who fought on both sides in the War of the Roses, is killed at the Battle of Barnet with the defeat of the Lancastrians.
1543   Bartoleme Ferrelo returns to Spain after discovering a large bay in the New World (San Francisco).
1775   The first abolitionist society in United States is organized in Philadelphia.
1793   A royalist rebellion in Santo Domingo is crushed by French republican troops.
1828   The first edition of Noah Webster’s dictionary is published.
1860   The first Pony Express rider arrives in San Francisco with mail originating in St. Joseph, Missouri.
1865   President Abraham Lincoln is assassinated in Ford’s Theater by John Wilkes Booth.
1894   Thomas Edison’s kinetoscope is shown to the public for the first time.
1900   The World Exposition opens in Paris.
1912   The passenger liner Titanic–deemed unsinkable–strikes an iceberg on her maiden voyage and begins to sink. The ship will go under the next day with a loss of 1,500 lives.
1931   King Alfonso XIII of Spain is overthrown.
1945   American B-29 bombers’s damage the Imperial Palace during firebombing raid over Tokyo.
1953   The Viet Minh invade Laos with 40,00 troops in their war against French colonial forces.
1959   The Taft Memorial Bell Tower is dedicated in Washington, D.C.
1961   The first live broadcast is televised from the Soviet Union.
1969   The first major league baseball game is played in Montreal, Canada.
1981   America’s first space shuttle, Columbia, returns to Earth.
Born on April 14
1578   Philip III, king of Spain and Portugal (1598-1621).
1629   Christian Huygens, Dutch astronomer.
1866   Anne Mansfield Sullivan, teacher who educated Helen Keller.
1889   Arnold Toynbee, English historian.
1898   Harold Black, electrical engineer.
1904   Sir John Gielgud, British actor.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.Im9sHjIN.dpuf

today’s holiday: St. Joseph’s Day (2015)


St. Joseph’s Day (2015)

In Valencia, Spain, the feast of the foster-father of Jesus is a week-long festival called Fallas de San Jose (Bonfires of St. Joseph). On St. Joseph’s Eve, March 18, fallas—huge floats of intricate scenes made of wood and papier-mâché, satirizing everything from the high cost of living to political personalities—parade through the streets. At midnight on March 19, the celebration ends with the spectacular ceremony known as the crema, when all the fallas are set on fire. The festival is said to reflect the happy and satirical nature of the Valencians. More… Discuss

If you care about God’s handiwork you’ll protect nature, Pope says


If you care about God‘s handiwork you’ll protect nature, Pope says
Lake Mountain Mist Nature (CC0 1.0).

By Ann Schneible

.- Set to finish his encyclical on the environment next month, Pope Francis said during his daily Mass at the Vatican on Monday that Christians who fail to safeguard nature do not care about God’s handiwork.

“A Christian who does not protect creation, who does not allow it to grow, is a Christian who does not care about God’s labors” which are borne out of God’s love for us, the Pope said Feb. 9.

His remarks were based in part on the day’s first reading from Genesis 1:1-19, comparing God’s creation of the universe with the Jesus’ “re-creation” of that which “had been ruined by sin.”

Pope Francis announced to journalists on his way to the Philippines last month that plans to have his much-anticipated encyclical on man’s relationship with creation finished in March. 

More here

Leonard Cohen – Take This Waltz [Official Music Video], great songs/interpretations


Leonard Cohen – Take This Waltz [Official Music Video]

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 

this pressed from VOA: Tsipras Names Austerity Critic as Greek Finance Chief


https://i0.wp.com/gdb.voanews.com/B5E67C27-2191-46E9-86D0-F8CA46613F52_w640_r1_s_cx0_cy7_cw0.jpg

Greece’s Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras poses for the photographers after taking a secular oath at the Presidential Palace in Athens, Jan. 26, 2015.

Tsipras Names Austerity Critic as Greek Finance Chief

Related Articles

Video Brussels Shaken as New Greek Leader Challenges Europe’s Austerity Drive

Photogallery Greece’s Tsipras Takes Control

Anti-austerity Leftists Winning Greek Election

VOA News

January 27, 2015 8:30 AM

An economist who has been an outspoken critic of Greece’s bailout deal with international lenders was named Tuesday as the country’s finance minister in the new leftist government.

Anti-austerity Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras picked Yanis Varoufakis for the key economic portfolio as he named other political supporters to his Cabinet after his Syriza party swept to victory in Sunday’s election.

via Tsipras Names Austerity Critic as Greek Finance Chief.

this pressed: Coffin with Cervantes’ initials found in Madrid | Reuters


Forensic expert Francisco Etxeberria (R) and archaeologist Almudena Garcia Rubio hold pictures showing the remains of niches, one of them appeared with the letters M.C. on it,  found in the crypt of Trinitarian convent as they pose outside the convent in Madrid January 26, 2015. REUTERS-Sergio Perez

1 of 8. Forensic expert Francisco Etxeberria (R) and archaeologist Almudena Garcia Rubio hold pictures showing the remains of niches, one of them appeared with the letters M.C. on it, found in the crypt of Trinitarian convent as they pose outside the convent in Madrid January 26, 2015. Credit: Reuters/Sergio Perez

(Reuters) – Historians searching for the tomb of Spain’s greatest writer, Miguel de Cervantes, said on Monday they had found fragments of a coffin with his initials on it, under a convent where he may have been buried.

Four centuries after the writer of Don Quixote died, experts have been trying to locate his remains in the hope of establishing an official burial site that would attract tourists and literary pilgrims.

They began using ground-penetrating radar last April to explore the sub-soil of an old brick-walled convent in the heart of Madrid where the writer had asked to buried.

Researchers said on Monday they had found some bones and a crumbling casket after digging in the crypt. A piece of the coffin had the letters “M” and “C.” on it, spelled out in metal tacks, they said.

via Coffin with Cervantes’ initials found in Madrid | Reuters.

this day in the yesteryear: The Caves of Nerja Are Rediscovered (1959)


The Caves of Nerja Are Rediscovered (1959)

One of Spain’s major tourist attractions is the Caves of Nerja, a series of caverns near the town of Nerja in the Province of Málaga. The caves were inhabited by prehistoric peoples, who left their mark in the form of paintings and other artifacts. Today, visitors can tour parts of the caves’ three galleries and view skeletons and other items on display there. Concerts are also regularly held in one of the caves’ many chambers. How did five friends inadvertently rediscover the caves in 1959? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Junkanoo Festival (2014)


Junkanoo Festival (2014)

The Junkanoo Parade and Festival, held in Nassau‘s native quarter, is celebrated each year on December 26, Boxing Day, and January 1, New Year’s Day. Masqueraded marchers wearing colorful headpieces and costumes dance to the beat of an Afro-Bahamian rhythm called Goombay. The music is played by a variety of unusual native instruments, including goat skin drums, lignum vitae sticks, pebble-filled “shak-shaks,” and steel drums. The Junkanoo parade, which begins at two o’clock in the morning and continues until sunrise, is followed by the judging of costumes and awarding of prizes. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Cali Fair (2014)


Cali Fair (2014)

The rich cultural identity of Santiago de Cali, Colombia, has been celebrated each year since 1957 at the Cali Fair. A major event that draws thousands of local residents and tourists from around the world, the Fair opens with the cabalgata, an elaborate cavalcade of riders mounted on fine horses. There are numerous artisans selling their crafts, street performers, and other forms of entertainment, and a salsa marathon is one of many dance events held each year. It is said that during Fair time, Cali is the home of the best salsa dancing in the world. More… Discuss

Joaquin Rodrigo – Concierto Para Una Fiesta (Pepe Romero):, great compositions/performances (check out the long list of compositions!)


Joaquin Rodrigo – Concierto Para Una Fiesta (Full Concerto)

From 1982, played by Pepe Romero.

today’s holiday: Trafalgar Day


Trafalgar Day

This is the anniversary of the famous naval battle fought by the British off Cape Trafalgar, Spain, in 1805, under the command of Viscount Horatio Nelson (1758-1805). The victory over Napoleon’s forces cost Lord Nelson his life and is commemorated by the column erected in his honor in London’s Trafalgar Square. Ceremonies on Trafalgar Day, or Nelson Day, include a naval parade from London’s Mall to Trafalgar Square, where a brief service is held and wreaths are placed at the foot of Nelson’s Column. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: US Government Prohibits All Exports to Cuba (1960)


US Government Prohibits All Exports to Cuba (1960)

After Cuba gained independence from Spain in 1898, US influence over the island grew. The two countries traded heavily until Fidel Castro rose to power in a bloody coup, and Cuba expropriated many American-owned land holdings. The US then enforced a prohibition of all exports to Cuba in 1960. Two years later, the US blockaded the island in order to compel the Soviet Union to dismantle its nuclear missile base. Although the word “embargo” exists in Spanish, what is the US embargo called in Cuba? More… Discuss

Part 2 of 2: The BBC is allowed to film in Cuba and show life under the absurd US trade embargo. Whilst the US moralises over a tiny Cuba, they do nothing about the likes of Iran, China and North Korea, who all have dubious human rights records. But of course, it’s easy to pick on a little island instead of a big country.
Recorded from BBC 1pm News, 26 February 2010.

The Weeping Willow


The Weeping Willow

Easily recognized by its long drooping branches and leaves, the weeping willow belongs to the Salicaceae family of deciduous trees and shrubs. It is native to China, but, as willow cuttings generally take root quite easily, it has been cultivated elsewhere for millennia. Legend has it that all of England‘s weeping willows are descended from a cutting sent to Lady Suffolk from Spain. Though it is widely cultivated for ornamental purposes, the weeping willow is used by some to serve what function? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Columbus Makes Landfall in the Caribbean (1492)


Columbus Makes Landfall in the Caribbean (1492)

Believing that Asia could be reached by traveling westward, Columbus’s three-ship expedition set sail from Palos, Spain, in 1492. After a stop at the Canary Islands, Columbus sailed due west, turning in a more southerly direction after about a month at sea. Shortly thereafter, Columbus quelled a small mutiny, and, on October 12, landed at an island in the Bahamas. Columbus also explored nearby Cuba and Hispaniola before returning to Spain. How many ships set sail with his second expedition? More… Discuss

Opus Dei


Opus Dei

Opus Dei is a Roman Catholic lay order founded in 1928 in Spain, where it gained support from the government of Francisco Franco after the Spanish Civil War. Roughly one-third of its more than 85,000 members are celibate and live communally. Opus Dei seeks to promote traditional Catholic values and teachings and opposes liberalism and immorality. It also emphasizes preaching to government officials, intellectuals, and business executives. Why has Opus Dei been controversial among some Catholics? More… Discuss

Enrique Granados. Valses poeticos by Mircea Gogoncea: make music part of your life series


Enrique Granados. Valses poeticos by Mircea Gogoncea

“It seldom happens that any felicity comes…”: Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)


It seldom happens that any felicity comes so pure as not to be tempered and allayed by some mixture of sorrow.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

Other quotations from Cervantes:

When the severity of the law is to be softened,
let pity, not bribes, be the motive.
– Miguel de Cervantes

When thou art at Rome, do as they do at Rome.
– Miguel de Cervantes

The most difficult character in comedy is that of the fool,
and he must be no simpleton that plays that part.
– Miguel de Cervantes

today’s holiday: Gibraltar National Day


Gibraltar National Day

On September 10, 1967, the people of Gibraltar participated in a national referendum and rejected the option to pass under Spanish Control. Since 1967, Gibraltarians have commemorated the referendum date. In recent years, events leading up to the momentous day have included dance performances, military band concerts, and a governor’s parade. On National Day, people typically dress in the national colors of red and white. A popular tradition is the ceremonial release of 30,000 red and white balloons, each representing an individual living on the rock. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Tomatina


La Tomatina (25.08.2010) - Spain, Buñol 16

La Tomatina (25.08.2010) – Spain, Buñol 16 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

La Tomatina (25.08.2010) - Spain, Buñol 11

La Tomatina (25.08.2010) – Spain, Buñol 11 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

La Tomatina (25.08.2010) - Spain, Buñol 13

La Tomatina (25.08.2010) – Spain, Buñol 13 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

La Tomatina (25.08.2010) - Spain, Buñol 31

La Tomatina (25.08.2010) – Spain, Buñol 31 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

La Tomatina (25.08.2010) - Spain, Buñol 014

La Tomatina (25.08.2010) – Spain, Buñol 014 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

La Tomatina (25.08.2010) - Spain, Buñol 27

La Tomatina (25.08.2010) – Spain, Buñol 27 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tomatina

Regardless of which legend one believes, what began in 1945 as a few tossed tomatoes as a show of disdain has developed into full-fledged tomato warfare in Buñol, Valencia, Spain, on the last Wednesday in August. Residents prepare for the impending food fight by protecting their storefronts and homes with plastic and donning special clothing. Thousands of pounds of tomatoes are trucked into town and dropped off at the Plaza del Pueblo, and the light-hearted battle commences. After the cleanup, celebrants continue to enjoy the festival’s fireworks, parades, food, and music. More… Discuss

The Prado Museum Access Google Art Project from this post, or from the new widjet at euzicasa


The Prado Museum

The Museo del Prado is Spain’s national art museum. Founded in Madrid in 1818 by Ferdinand VII, it features one of the world’s finest collections of European art, much of which came from the royal holdings of the Habsburg and Bourbon monarchs in Spain. In 1872, the Prado acquired

The Prado Museum

many notable works formerly owned by Spanish convents and monasteries. It owns outstanding pieces by El Greco, Diego Velázquez, and Francisco de Goya. What is considered its most famous work on display? More… Discuss

Google Cultural Institute_ Virtual Art Museums tours

Click here to access and select a virtual museum tour

 

Saint of the Day for Tuesday, August 26th, 2014: St. Teresa of Jesus Jornet Ibars


Tomás de Torquemada


Tomás de Torquemada

A Dominican prior, Torquemada grew close to Ferdinand II and Isabella I of the newly created kingdom of Spain, becoming their confessor and advisor. He was appointed Inquisitor General in 1483. Remembered for his cruelty, he owes his reputation to the harsh rules of procedure that he devised for the Spanish Inquisition and to the rigor with which he had them enforced. He was largely instrumental in bringing about the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492. What limited his power in 1494? More… Discuss

today’s Saint, July 31: Feast of St. Ignatius Loyola


Feast of St. Ignatius Loyola

St. Ignatius Loyola (1491-1556) founded the Society of Jesus, the Roman Catholic religious order whose members are known as Jesuits. The Feast of St. Ignatius is celebrated by Jesuits everywhere, but particularly in the Basque region of Spain where he was born. The largest Basque community in North America, located in Boise, Idaho, holds its annual St. Ignatius Loyola Picnic on the last weekend in July—an event often referred to as the Basque Festival. More… Discuss

“Los Grandes Compositores” CASSETTE #76: Albéniz – Granados – Falla : make music part of your life series


[youtube.com/watch?v=HJCLyVNZBhs]

“Los Grandes Compositores”  CASSETTE #76: Albéniz – Granados – Falla

This video is a scan of the cassette #76 of the encyclopedic collection “The Great Composers”, published in 1982 by the “Encyclopedia Salvat” in collaboration with the “Record Label Philips”.

All rights reserved copyright both Salvat and Philips.

This video has a didactic purpose only, to see if the process is correct fingering and listening acceptably. The user interaction will be helpful to learn more in the digitization process; most cassette will come in the future, I hope your feedback about it. Thank you.

Narciso Yepez en la guitarra, interpreta: [Narciso Yepez on guitar, plays:]

Isaac Albéniz:

Pista 1(track 1) – Suite española, Op. 47 #5 “Asturias” (Leyenda) [Spanish Suite, Op 47 # 5 “Asturias” (Leyenda)]

Pista 2(track 2) – Recuerdos de viaje, Op. 71 #6 “Rumores de la caleta” (Malagueña) [Souvenirs, Op 71 # 6 “Rumors of the creek” (Malagueña)]

Pista 3(track 3) – Piezas características, Op. 92 #12 “Torre Bermeja” (Serenata) [Characteristic Pieces, Op 92 # 12 “Torre Bermeja” (Serenade)]

Pista 4(track 4) – España, Op. 165 #3 “Malagueña” [Spain, Op 165 # 3 “Malagueña”]

Enrique Granados:

Pista 5(track 5) – Danza española #4 “Villanesca” [Spanish Dance # 4 “Villanesca”]

Manuel de Falla: El sombrero de tres picos, danzas: Interpretado por la Orquesta de la Radio de Berlin, dirigidos por el Sr. Lorin Maszel [The three-cornered hat, dance: Performed by the Orchestra of Radio Berlin, conducted by Mr. Lorin Maazel]

Pista 6(track 6) – Fandango

Pista 7(track 7) – Seguidillas

Pista 8(track 8) – Farruca

Pista 9(track 9) – Jota

BBC News – In pictures: Rounding-up of wild horses in Galicia, Spain


 

BBC News – In pictures: Rounding-up of wild horses in Galicia, Spain.

The Running of the Bulls in Pamplona


The Running of the Bulls in Pamplona

The festival of San Fermin is a deeply rooted celebration held annually, from July 6 to July 14, in the city of Pamplona, Spain. It commemorates San Fermin, who was allegedly dragged to his death by bulls. The festival’s most famous event is the encierro, the running of the bulls, which involves many residents and visitors running in front of bulls down a stretch of narrow streets. Hundreds of people are injured during the encierro each year. How many people have been killed? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: San Fermin Festival


San Fermin Festival

The festivities surrounding this well-known festival in Pamplona, Spain, honoring the city’s bishop, begin with a rocket fired from the balcony of the town hall. Bands of txistularis—with dancers, drummers, and txistu players (a musical instrument like a flute)—march through the town playing songs announcing the “running of the bulls,” an event that has taken place here for 400 years. Each morning, young men, dressed in typical Basque costumes, risk their lives running through the streets ahead of the bulls being run to the bullring where the bullfights will be held. More… Discuss

quotation: Delay always breeds danger and to protract a great design is often to ruin it. ( Miguel de Cervantes)


Delay always breeds danger and to protract a great design is often to ruin it.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

make music part of your life series: Serenata Española de Joaquim Malats Pepe Romero


[youtube.com/watch?v=we2csh9eaIc]

Serenata Española de Joaquim Malats Pepe Romero

read more about Joaquin Malats: Serenata Española @ takis konstantopoulos: for the promotion of rigour and rationality on BLOGGER! Check it out!

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pepe Romero (born March 8, 1944 in Málaga, Spain) is a world-renowned classical and flamenco guitarist. He is particularly famous for his outstanding technique and colorful musical interpretations on the instrument.

Pepe Romero
Pepe Romero 2000.JPG

Pepe Romero in 2000
Background information
Born March 8, 1944 (age 70)
Málaga, Spain
Genres Classical music, flamenco
Occupations Guitarist, arranger
Instruments Guitar
Years active fl. ca. 1959 – present
Labels Philips Records
Associated acts The Romero Guitar Quartet
Website www.peperomero.com
Notable instruments
Torres 1856

Biography

As a soloist Pepe Romero has appeared in the United States, Canada, Europe, China, and many countries around the world with the Toronto, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago, Houston, Pittsburgh, Boston, San Francisco and Dallas Symphony Orchestras, as well as with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the New York, Bogota and Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestras, the Boston Pops Orchestra, the Hong Kong Sinfonietta and the London Symphony Orchestra, the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, the Monte Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra, I Musici, the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, Philharmonia Hungarica, the Hungarian State Orchestra, the Spanish National Orchestra, the Spanish National Radio/Television Orchestra, L’Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, The New Moscow Chamber Orchestra, the Springfiled Orchestra, the Lausanne Chamber Orchestra, the American Sinfonietta and the Bournemouth Symphony. He has been a special guest at the festivals of Salzburg, Israel, Schleswig-Holstein, Menuhin, Osaka, Granada, Istanbul, Ravinia, Garden State, Hollywood Bowl, Blossom, Wolf Trap, Saratoga and Hong Kong.

Since his first recording (at the age of 15) he has recorded over 50 solo albums and 30 albums as part of the famed guitar quartet The Romeros. He has played for Presidents Carter and Nixon, the Queen of the Netherlands, the Prince of Wales and Pope John Paul II. He has numerous international recording awards to his credit and has received an Honorary Doctorate in Music from University of Victoria.

His contributions to the field of classical guitar have inspired a number of distinguished composers to write works specifically for him, including Joaquín Rodrigo, Federico Moreno Torroba, Rev. Francisco de Madina, Lorenzo Palomo, Michael Zearott, Enrique Diemecke, and Celedonio Romero.

Pepe Romero is the second son of Celedonio Romero, who was his only guitar teacher. His first professional appearance was in a shared concert with his father when Pepe was only seven years old. In 1957 Celedonio Romero left Franco‘s Spain for the United States with his family.

On February 11, 2000, King Juan Carlos I of Spain knighted Pepe Romero and his brothers, Celin and Ángel, into the Order of “Isabel la Catolica.” The official ceremony of this high honor took place at the USC Thornton School of Music, and included a gala performance by The Romeros with the Thornton Chamber Orchestra. He is currently Adjunct Professor of Classical Guitar at the Thornton School, where he was named “Distinguished Artist in Residence” in 2004.[1][2]

Although originally a classical guitarist, he is talented in Flamenco and a popular Flamenco performer. His most famous Flamenco-only album is called ¡Flamenco Fenómeno!

The Romero Guitar Quartet

The Romero Guitar Quartet

today’s holiday: Human Towers of Valls


Human Towers of Valls

On St. John’s Day in the city of Valls in the Catalan region of Spain, a touring acrobatic company, or comparsa, presents the human tower of Valls. The acrobats form human towers or pyramids with four to six men at the base and one or more children at the top. The towers can extend to eight times a man’s height, and they are formed to the musical accompaniment of the gralla, or native oboe. There is a point during the performance at which the children on top salute, the music ceases, and the entire structure stands immobile for several seconds before collapsing gracefully to the ground. More… Discuss

make music part of your life series: Pepe Romero – Suite Espanola, Op. 47, No. 3 Sevilla (Isaac Albeniz)


[youtube.com/watch?v=KZIxc8RoEbU]

Pepe Romero – Suite Espanola, Op. 47, No. 3 Sevilla (Isaac Albeniz)

 

today’s holiday: Argentine National Day


Argentine National Day

Argentina was one of a number of Spanish colonies controlled by the Spanish viceroy in Lima, Peru. On May 25, 1810, Buenos Aires declared its independence from the viceroyalty but continued to pledge loyalty to the Spanish crown. May 25 is observed throughout the country as the anniversary of the revolution; independence from Spain wasn’t declared until July 9, 1816. Both days are national holidays and are observed with religious services at the cathedral and special performances at the Colón Theatre in Buenos Aires. More… Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Luigi Boccherini. Musica Notturna delle Strade di Madrid


[youtube.com/watch?v=p0f-rQV–jU]

Luigi Boccherini. Musica Notturna delle Strade di Madrid

Luigi Bocherini. Quintet en do major per a cordes (Opus 30) núm. 6. G. 324 (Musica Notturna delle Strade di Madrid).

Le Concert des Nations.
Director: Jordi Savall.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Juan Crisostomo Arriaga – Symphony in D Major


[youtube.com/watch?v=KZZpejIvOCM]

Juan Arriaga – Symphony in D Major
00:00 I. Adagio – Allegro vivace
09:00 II. Andante
18:23 III. Minuetto
23:02 IV. Allegro con moto

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Juan Crisóstomo Jacobo Antonio de Arriaga y Balzola
Juan de Arriaga.jpg

Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga
Born January 27, 1806
Bilbao, Spain
Died January 17, 1826 (aged 19)
Paris, France
Occupation Composer
Parents Juan Simón de Arriaga

Juan Crisóstomo Jacobo Antonio de Arriaga y Balzola (January 27, 1806 – January 17, 1826) was a Spanish composer. He was nicknamed “the Spanish Mozart” after he died, because, like Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, he was both a child prodigy and an accomplished composer who died young. They also shared the same first and second baptismal names; and they shared the same birthday, January 27 (fifty years apart).

 

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ARTICLE: Martin Guerre


Martin Guerre

In the 16th century, a French peasant named Martin Guerre abruptly disappeared after being accused of stealing grain from his father. He moved to Spain and joined the army. He was wounded during a military campaign, and his leg had to be amputated. After spending some time in a monastery, Guerre returned to France, only to discover that an imposter had been living with his family. When faced with the real Martin Guerre, his relatives realized they had been had. What happened to the imposter? More… Discuss

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Great Compositions/Performances: Rimsky Korsakov Capriccio Espagnol Op 34 Berliner Phil Dir Zubin Mehta


[youtube.com/watch?v=Lh6mDL-VwYw]

Rimsky Korsakov Capriccio Espagnol Op 34 Berliner Phil Dir Zubin Mehta

 

Capriccio espagnol, Op. 34, is the common Western title for an orchestral work based on Spanish folk melodies and written by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov in 1887. Rimsky-Korsakov originally intended to write the work for a solo violin with orchestra, but later decided that a purely orchestral work would do better justice to the lively melodies. The Russian title is Каприччио на испанские темы (literally, Capriccio on Spanish Themes). The Capriccio consists of five movements and is scored for 2 flutes, piccolo, 2 oboes (one doubling English horn), 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion, harp and strings.[

Structure

The work has five movements, divided into two parts comprising the first three and the latter two movements respectively..

  1. The first movement, Alborada, is a festive and exciting dance, typically from traditional asturian music to celebrate the rising of the sun. It features the clarinet with two solos, and later features a solo violin with a solo similar to the clarinet’s.
  2. The second movement, Variazioni, begins with a melody in the horn section. Variations of this melody are then repeated by other instruments and sections of the orchestra.
  3. The third movement, Alborada, presents the same asturian dance as the first movement. The two movements are nearly identical, in fact, except that this movement has a different instrumentation and key.
  4. The fourth movement, Scena e canto gitano (“Scene and gypsy song”) opens with five cadenzas — first by the horns and trumpets, then solo violin, flute, clarinet, and harp — played over rolls on various percussion instruments. It is then followed by a dance in triple time leading attacca into the final movement.
  5. The fifth and final movement, Fandango asturiano, is also an energetic dance from the Asturias region of northern Spain. The piece ends with an even more rousing statement of the Alborada theme.

A complete performance of the Capriccio takes around 16 minutes

Use in film

  • Capriccio Espagnol, Op.34 is played during the opening credits and as the Spanish Carnaval background music during Josef von Sternberg‘s film The Devil Is a Woman (1935), credited on screen as ‘Music based on Rimsky-Korsakoff’s “Spanish Caprice” and Old Spanish Melodies’.
  • Excerpts were heard in the fictional 1947 biopic of Rimsky-Korsakov, Song of Scheherazade.
  • A recording by “Philharmonia Slavonica” featured in the film Brokeback Mountain (2006). The “Philharmonia Slavonica” is pseudonymous group that appears on a number of recordings of the bargain-record producer Alfred Scholz. The performances attributed to them are often by the Austrian Radio (ORF) Orchestra.
  • A recording by the Moscow Radio Symphony in the film Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (1988)

 

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NEWS: TEENY-WEENY MOUSE-DEER BORN


Teeny-Weeny Mouse-Deer Born

Though they are not closely related to true deermouse-deer are so named because they resemble tiny deer. The smallest of the hoofed mammals, mouse-deer stand just about 12 inches (30 cm) high when fully grown. The Java mouse-deer, Tragulus javanicus, is under threat as a result of habitat loss, and breeding programs have been established to try to preserve the species. One such program at a zoo in Spain has announced the recent birth of a cute, little, hamster-sized, baby Java mouse-deer. More… Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Voces8 performs ‘Maria’ from West Side Story


[youtube.com/watch?v=4HWeo_eV_zA]
International award winning a cappella octet, Voces8 performs ‘Maria’ from West Side Story. The arrangement was written especially for Voces8 by Composer in Residence, Jim Clements and was recorded live in Spain in November 2007.

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QUOTATION: Miguel de Cervantes


 

Busto de Miguel de Cervantes / Bust of Miguel ...

Busto de Miguel de Cervantes / Bust of Miguel de Cervantes (Photo credit: Lumiago)

Take care, your worship, those things over there are not giants but windmills.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: FEAST OF SAN ISIDRO OF SEVILLE


Feast of San Isidro of Seville

St. Isidro, or Isidore, (c. 560-636) was born in Cartagena, Spain, and eventually became bishop of Seville. In Río Frío, Colombia, April occurs in autumn and is typically very dry. On San Isidro’s feast day, April 4, townspeople process the saint’s image around the streets in the hope that he will help bring rain. The procession takes two steps forward, then one step backward, and so on, with the idea that if it drags out long enough, some rain may fall before the festivities end. If no rain falls, those who had been singing praises to St. Isidro may begin to insult and swear at him. More… Discuss

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ARTICLE: LA FLORIDA


La Florida

In 1513, Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León set out from Puerto Rico, sailing northeast through the Bahamas. He soon sighted the Florida peninsula, which he believed was actually an island, and in early April, he became the first European to reach it. His discovery coincided with the Easter feast, Pascua Florida, and is perhaps the reason why he named the land he claimed for Spain “La Florida.” What legendary site do many believe the explorer was searching for when he found Florida? More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: ST. JOSEPH’S DAY


St. Joseph’s Day

In Valencia, Spain, the feast of the foster-father of Jesus is a week-long festival called Fallas de San Jose (Bonfires of St. Joseph). On St. Joseph’s Eve, March 18,fallas (huge floats of intricate scenes made of wood andpapier-mâché, satirizing everything from the high cost of living to political personalities) parade through the streets. At midnight on March 19, the celebration ends with the spectacular ceremony known as the crema, when all the fallas are set on fire. The festival is said to reflect the happy and satirical nature of the ValenciansMore…Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: FERDINAND MAGELLAN REACHES THE PHILIPPINES (1521)


Ferdinand Magellan Reaches the Philippines (1521)

Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan set sail from Spain on September 20, 1519, with five vessels and about 265 men. Sighting the South American coast near Pernambuco, he searched for a suspected passage to the South Sea and ultimately discovered the strait that bears his name. On March 6, 1521, Magellan reached the Marianas and 10 days later the Philippines, where he was killed in a battle with the natives. How many of Magellan’s original crew members returned to Spain alive in 1522? More… Discuss

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Manuel de Falla – La Vida Breve (Spanish Dance No.1) Orchestral



Manuel de FallaLa Vida Breve (Spanish Dance No.1) Orchestral
(Reuploaded)
https://www.facebook.com/BestWMelodies

 

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TODAY’S SAINT: ST. JOHN OF GOD


Feastday: March 8
John of God is patron saint of booksellers, printers, heart patients, hospitals, nurses, the sick, and firefighters and is considered the founder of the Brothers Hospitallers.
1495 – 1550
From the time he was eight to the day he died, John followed every impulse of his heart. The challenge for him was to rush to follow the promptings of the Holy Spirit gave him, not his own human temptations. But unlike many who act impulsively, when John made a decision, no matter how quickly, he stuck with it, no matter what the hardship.

At eight years old, John heard a visiting priest speak of adventures that were waiting in the age of 1503 with new worlds being opened up. That very night he ran away from home to travel with thepriest and never saw his parents again. They begged their way from village to village until John fell sick. The man who nursed him back to health, the manager of a large estate, adopted John.John worked as a shepherd in the mountains until he was 27. Feeling pressure to marry the manager’s daughter, whom he loved as a sister, John took off to join the Spanish army in the waragainst France. As a soldier, he was hardly a model of holiness, taking part in the gambling, drinking, and pillaging that his comrades enjoyed. One day, he was thrown from a stolen horse near French lines. Frightened that he would be captured or killed, he reviewed his life and vowed impulsively to make a change.

When he returned he kept his spur of the moment vow, made a confession, and immediately changed his life. His comrades didn’tmind so much that John was repenting but hated that he wanted them to give up their pleasures too. So they used his impulsivenature to trick him into leaving his post on the pretext of helping someone in need. He was rescued from hanging at the last minute and thrown out of the army after being beaten and stripped. He begged his way back to his foster-home where he worked as a shepherd until he heard of a new war with Moslems invading Europe. Off he went but after the war was over, he decided to try to find his real parents. To his grief he discovered both had died in his absence.

As a shepherd he had plenty of time to contemplate what God might want of his life. When he decided at 38 that he should go to Africa to ransom Christian captives, he quit immediately and set off for the port of Gibraltar. He was on the dock waiting for his ship when he saw a family obviously upset and grieving. When he discovered they were a noble family being exiled to Africa after political intrigues, he abandoned his original plan and volunteered to be their servant. The family fell sick when they reached their exile and John kept them alive not only by nursing them but by earning money to feed them. His job building fortifications was grueling, inhuman work and the workers were beaten and mistreated by people who called themselves Catholics. Seeing Christians act this way so disturbed John that it shook his faith. A priest advised him not to blame the Church for their actions and to leave for Spain at once. John did go back home — but only after he learned that his newly adopted family had received pardons.

In Spain he spent his days unloading ship cargoes and his nights visiting churches and reading spiritual books. Reading gave him so much pleasure that he decided that he should share this joy with others. He quit his job and became a book peddler, traveling from town to town selling religious books and holy cards. A vision at age 41 brought him to Granada where he sold books from a little shop. (For this reason he is patron saint of booksellers and printers.)

After hearing a sermon from the famous John of Avila on repentance, he was so overcome by the thought of his sins that the whole town thought the little bookseller had gone from simple eccentricity to madness. After the sermon John rushed back to his shop, tore up any secular books he had, gave away all his religious books and all his money. Clothes torn and weeping, he was the target of insults, jokes, and even stones and mud from the townspeople and their children.

Friends took the distraught John to the Royal Hospital where he was interned with the lunatics. John suffered the standard treatment of the time — being tied down and daily whipping. John of Avila came to visit him there and told him his penance had gone on long enough — forty days, the same amount as the Lord’s suffering the desert — and had John moved to a better part of the hospital.

John of God could never see suffering without trying to do something about it. And now that he was free to move, although still a patient, he immediately got up and began to help the other sick people around him. The hospital was glad to have his unpaid nursing help and were not happy to release him when one day he walked in to announce he was going to start his own hospital.

John may have been positive that God wanted him to start a hospital for the poor who got bad treatment, if any, from the other hospitals, but everyone else still thought of him as a madman. It didn’t help that he decided to try to finance his plan by selling wood in the square. At night he took what little money he earned and brought food and comfort to the poor living in abandoned buildings and under bridges. Thus his first hospital was the streets of Granada.

Within an hour after seeing a sign in a window saying “House to let for lodging of the poor” he had rented the house in order to move his nursing indoors. Of course he rented it without money for furnishings, medicine, or help. After he begged money for beds, he went out in the streets again and carried his ill patients back on the same shoulders that had carried stones, wood, and books. Once there he cleaned them, dressed their wounds, and mended their clothes at night while he prayed. He used his old experience as a peddler to beg alms, crying through the streets in his peddler’s voice, “Do good to yourselves! For the love of God, Brothers, do good!” Instead of selling goods, he took anything given — scraps of good, clothing, a coin here and there.

Throughout his life he was criticized by people who didn’t like the fact that his impulsive love embraced anyone in need without asking for credentials or character witnesses. When he was able to move his hospital to an old Carmelite monastery, he opened a homeless shelter in the monastery hall. Immediately critics tried to close him down saying he was pampering troublemakers. His answer to this criticism always was that he knew of only one bad character in the hospital and that was himself. His urge to act immediately when he saw need got him into trouble more than a few times. Once, when he encountered a group of starving people, he rushed into a house,stole a pot of food, and gave it to them. He was almost arrested for that charity! Another time, on finding a group of children in rags, he marched them into a clothing shop and bought them all new clothes. Since he had no money, he paid for it all on credit!

Yet his impulsive wish to help saved many people in one emergency. The alarm went out that the Royal Hospital was on fire. When he dropped everything to run there, he found that the crowd was just standing around watching the hospital — and its patients — go up in flames. He rushed into the blazing building and carried or led the patients out. When all the patients were rescued, he started throwing blankets, sheets, and mattresses out the windows — how well he knew from his own hard work how important these things were. At that point a cannon was brought to destroy the burning part of the building in order to save the rest. John stopped them, ran up the roof, and separated the burning portion with an axe. He succeeded but fell through the burning roof. All thought they had lost their hero until John of God appeared miraculously out of smoke. (For this reason, John of God is patron saint of firefighters.)

John was ill himself when he heard that a flood was bringing precious driftwood near the town. He jumped out of bed to gather the wood from the raging river. Then when one of his companions fell into the river, John without thought for his illness or safety jumped in after him. He failed to save the boy and caught pneumonia. He died on March 8, his fifty-fifth birthday, of the same impulsive love that had guided his whole life.

John of God is patron saint of booksellers, printers, heart patients, hospitals, nurses, the sick, and firefighters and is considered the founder of the Brothers Hospitallers.

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: MARZAS


Marzas

On the last night of February and the first of March in Spain, young marceros, or March serenaders, wander through the streets singing songs to their girlfriends and asking for donations of food and sweets to celebrate the arrival of spring. The term marzas refers both to the traditional songs they sing and to the gifts they receive. Although the songs themselves vary, they always mention the month of March and the coming of spring, leading many to believe that the tradition has its roots in paganrituals celebrating the passing of winter. More… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Miguel de Cervantes


Everyone is as God has made him, and oftentimes a great deal worse.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Claudio Arrau plays Debussy Estampes, no.2, “La soirée dans Grenade”


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaEstampes (Prints), L.100, is a composition for solo piano by Claude Debussy. It was finished in 1903.

Estampes contains three movements:

  1. Pagodes (Pagodas) – approx. 6 minutes.
  2. La soirée dans Grenade (The Evening in Granada) – approx. 5½ minutes.
  3. Jardins sous la pluie (Gardens in the Rain) – approx. 3½ minutes.[1]

II. La soirée dans Grenade

La soirée dans Grenade uses the Arabic scale and mimics guitar strumming to evoke images of GranadaSpain. At the time of its writing, Debussy’s only personal experience with the country was a few hours spent in San Sebastián.[2] Despite this, the Spanish composer Manuel de Falla said of Soirée, “There is not even one measure of this music borrowed from the Spanish folklore, and yet the entire composition in its most minute details, conveys admirably Spain“.[3]

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