Tag Archives: Spinal cord


Paralysis Reversed with Olfactory Cells

A man paralyzed from the chest down in a knife attack that severed his spine in 2010 has regained the ability to walk, with assistance, thanks to a pioneering new surgery that involved transplanting olfactory cells into his spinal cord. Olfactory ensheathing cells grow throughout life and can regenerate after injury, so researchers hypothesized that they would be ideally suited to help bridge the gap in the patient‘s spinal cord. Now, two years after the surgery, the patient is able to walk with the aid of a frame and has recovered some bladder, bowel, and sexual function. More… Discuss

NEWS: SPINAL STIMULATION LETS PARALYZED PATIENTS MOVE THEIR LEGS AGAIN


Spinal Stimulation Lets Paralyzed Patients Move Their Legs Again

Four men who had been paralyzed from the chest down for more than two years regained the ability to voluntarily move their legs and feet after having an electrical deviceimplanted in their spines. Though the procedure did not restore their ability to walk, simply being able to control the movement of their once-paralyzed limbs has had far-reaching benefits both physical—increased muscle mass, improved bladder and sexual function—and psychological. It remains unclear why epidural stimulation has this effect, but researchers suspect it makes the lower spinal cord more excitable and therefore more receptive to signals from the brain. More… Discuss

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