Tag Archives: St. Louis

Saint of the Day for Thursday, April 30th, 2015: St. Pius V, Pope


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today’s birthday: Spiridon Louis (1873)


Spiridon Louis (1873)

Following the decision to revive the Olympic Games at the end of the 19th century, all eyes were on Athens, where the first modern games were held in 1896. Greek competitor Spiridon Louis won the first marathon event of the games and instantly became a national hero. He was first across the finish despite having allegedly taken a break from the race to have a glass of wine at an inn. It helped that some of his competitors collapsed along the way. Why was the third-place finisher disqualified? More… Discuss

the ALAMO: Word of the standoff ricocheted across America, prompting a deluge of supportive messages for the fatigued but tenacious holdout.


The Alamo, built in the 18th century from locally quarried limestone, rests deep in the heart of Texas. (Photo: Library of Congress)

The Alamo, built in the 18th century from locally quarried limestone, rests deep in the heart of Texas. (Photo: Library of Congress) – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/here-is-where-holding-the-fort-in-san-antonio.htm#sthash.BtnOn3Zo.dpuf

Barricaded in a freezing cold, rat-infested room inside the Alamo, the lone defender had gone almost three days without food, water or sleep after armed men had positioned themselves around the compound. Word of the standoff ricocheted across America, prompting a deluge of supportive messages for the fatigued but tenacious holdout.

“Win or lose, we congratulate you upon your splendid patriotism and courage,” read one telegram from New York signed by John B. Adams, a descendant of President John Adams. Editors from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch wired San Antonio: “Commandant of the Alamo:—Will you send…a message to the women of St. Louis, who are watching with great interest your own gallant defense of the Alamo?”

The “commandant” was no military officer but a 46-year-old Texas schoolteacher named Adina De Zavala, who had commenced her one-woman siege on February 10, 1908. De Zavala replied to the Post-Dispatch: “My immortal forefathers suffered every privation to defend the freedom of Texas. I, like them, am willing to die for what I believe to be right. . . . The officers cannot starve me into submission.”

De Zavala’s impassioned statement echoed the urgent message Lt. Col. William Barret Travis had dashed off 72 years earlier, on February 24, 1836, when his 200 Texan and Tejano rebels were fortified inside the old mission, surrounded by several thousand Mexican troops under President General Antonio López de Santa Anna.

“To the People of Texas and All Americans in the World,” Travis wrote, “I am besieged, by a thousand or more of the Mexicans under Santa Anna—I have sustained a continual Bombardment & cannonade for 24 hours & have not lost a man—The enemy has demanded a surrender at discretion, otherwise, the garrison are to be put to the sword, if the fort is taken—I have answered the demand with a cannon shot, & our flag still waves proudly from the walls—I shall never surrender or retreat. Then, I call on you in the name of Liberty, of patriotism, & every thing dear to the American character, to come to our aid, with all dispatch. . . . If this call is neglected, I am determined to sustain myself as long as possible & die like a soldier who never forgets what is due to his own honor & that of his country—Victory or Death.”

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/here-is-where-holding-the-fort-in-san-antonio.htm#sthash.BtnOn3Zo.dpuf

Barbara Harbach’s Carondelet Caprice in St. Louis: make music part of your life series


Barbara Harbach‘s Carondelet Caprice in St. Louis

this pressed: Ferguson protesters chanting ‘shame’ storm St. Louis City Hall; at least 2 arrested


Ferguson protesters chanting ‘shame’ storm St. Louis City Hall; at least 2 arrested
ST. LOUIS – Authorities have arrested at least two people at a protest over the Ferguson grand jury decision in which several demonstrators stormed City Hall in St. Louis.

An undetermined number of protesters made it into the building Wednesday while shouting “Shame, shame.”The protest march included several hundred people and began with a mock trial of Ferguson Officer Darren Wilson, who shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown. It was held on the steps of the Old Courthouse, the site of the Dred Scott trial.More than 100 additional police officers were called to the building and it was locked down.

A total of 58 people were arrested at area protests overnight, including 45 in Ferguson.

via Ferguson protesters chanting ‘shame’ storm St. Louis City Hall; at least 2 arrested.

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This pressed for your right to know: Ferguson protests spread across US


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Ferguson protests spread across US

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-30203526

Steve McQueen and Peggy Moffitt, 1963 — OnThisDay & Facts


this pressed for the record: Thousands join ‘weekend of resistance’ as Brown protests expand beyond Ferguson – CSMonitor.com


Protests over the Aug. 9 killing of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, continue to grow as thousands of people from all over the United States descended on greater St. Louis to take part in a weekend-long series of events and marches demanding “justice” for the killing.

Events in what one student called “the epicenter of the movement against police brutality” have transformed since the violence of the immediate aftermath of the shooting into a more sophisticated, but often edgy and raw, strategy where protesters are fanning out to civic events like the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and sporting events, including this weekend’s baseball playoffs featuring the St. Louis Cardinals.

via Thousands join ‘weekend of resistance’ as Brown protests expand beyond Ferguson – CSMonitor.com.

How Ferguson brought live streams into the mainstream – CNET (violence against one is violence against all)


Citizen footage widened the lens of civil unrest in Ferguson, Mo., and it brought live-streaming to popular attention in the US unlike any confrontation has before.

via How Ferguson brought live streams into the mainstream – CNET.

“uncivil response to civic unrest”

this pressed: Amid Protests, Missouri Governor Orders Curfew in Ferguson


FBI michael brownAmid Protests, Missouri Governor Orders Curfew in Ferguson.

Memento: Kate Chopin


Memento: Kate Chopin

 
 

Kate Chopin in 1894

Kate Chopin in 1894 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Born Katherine O’Flaherty
February 8, 1850
St. Louis, Missouri, United States
Died August 22, 1904 (aged 54)
St. Louis, Missouri, United States
Occupation Novelist, short story writer
Genres realistic fiction
Notable work(s) The Awakening

Kate Chopin, born Katherine O’Flaherty (February 8, 1850 — August 22, 1904), was an American author of short stories and novels. She is now considered by some to have been a forerunner of the feminist authors of the 20th century.

From 1892 to 1895, she wrote short stories for both children and adults which were published in such magazines as Atlantic Monthly, Vogue, The Century Magazine, and The Youth’s Companion. Her major works were two short story collections, Bayou Folk (1894) and A Night in Acadie (1897). Her important short stories included “Desiree’s Baby,” a tale of miscegenation in antebellum Louisiana (published in 1893),[1]The Story of an Hour” (1894),[2] and “The Storm“(1898).[1] “The Storm” is a sequel to “The ‘Cadian Ball,” which appeared in her first collection of short stories, Bayou Folk.[1] Chopin also wrote two novels: At Fault (1890) and The Awakening (1899), which are set in New Orleans and Grand Isle, respectively. The people in her stories are usually inhabitants of Louisiana. Many of her works are set in Natchitoches in north central Louisiana.

Within a decade of her death, Chopin was widely recognized as one of the leading writers of her time. In 1915, Fred Lewis Pattee[3] wrote, “some of [Chopin’s] work is equal to the best that has been produced in France or even in America. [She displayed] what may be described as a native aptitude for narration amounting almost to genius.”

Article: HORSEPOWER INDEED


Horsepower Indeed

Early streetcars had horsepower, literally; they were drawn by horses or mules and called “horsecars.” By the late 1880s, there were 415 street railway companies in the US. However, horses could only work for about four hours a day and needed to be groomed, fed, and housed—and they left behind tremendous amounts of waste. These issues, coupled with the introduction of the overhead trolley system in 1887, spelled the end of the horsecar era. Where was the last functional horsecar in the US? More…Discuss

 


This story originally appeared in American Songwriter magazine in 2009. 

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On the Memory Trail: Lou Reed Remembered)


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