Tag Archives: String quartet

Amazing music/performances: Beethoven String Quartet No 2 Op 18 in G major Alban Berg Quartet


Beethoven String Quartet No 2 Op 18 in G major Alban Berg Quartet

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make music part of your life series: Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy String Quartet No. 6 in F minor, Op. 80


Mendelssohn: Four Pieces for String Quartet, Op.81 – 2. Scherzo


 

Published on Nov 8, 2014

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Mendelssohn: Four Pieces for String Quartet, Op.81 – 2. Scherzo · Emerson String Quartet

℗ 2005 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Composer: Mendelssohn

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historic musical bits: Beethoven – String Quartet No.5 in A major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952


 

Beethoven – String Quartet No.5 in A major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952

 

hidtoric musical bits: , Brahms String Quartet Op. 51, No.1 in C minor , great compositions/performances


Brahms String Quartet Op. 51 No.1 in C minor

 

The return of the past – THE LP: The Fine Arts Quartet: Courtly Music of Mendelssohn (4/6: Four Pieces for String Quartet, op. 81) , great compositions/performance s


The Fine Arts Quartet: Courtly Music of Mendelssohn (4/6: Four Pieces for String Quartet, op. 81)

 

Schubert – “String Quartet in E Major, Op. post. 125 Nr. 1, D-87 (November 1813 ?)- Amadeus String Quartet , great compositions/performances


Schubert –  “String Quartet in E Major, Op. post. 125 Nr. 1, D-87

(November 1813 ?)- Amadeus String Quartet 

Veridian String Quartet: Mendelssohn Op. 44 No. 3 , great compositions/performances


Veridian String Quartet: Mendelssohn Op. 44 No. 3

Mozart / Divertimento in F major, K. 138, : Great compositions/performances


Mozart / Divertimento in F major, K. 138

Schubert Rondo in A for Violin and String Quartet. James Buswell and Carpe Diem String Quartet: make music part of your life series


Schubert Rondo in A for Violin and String Quartet. James Buswell and Carpe Diem String Quartet.

Tchaikovsky String Quartet Op. 11 – II. Andante cantabile (Kontras Quartet): great compositions/performances


Beethoven – String Quartet Op.59, No.2 “Rasumovsky” – Végh Quartet – 1952: great compositions/performances


Beethoven – String Quartet Op.59, No.2 “Rasumovsky” – Végh Quartet – 1952

Prazak Quartet & Zemlinsky Quartet : Felix Mendelssohn String octet E-flat major Op. 20: great compositions/performances


Prazak Quartet & Zemlinsky Quartet : Felix Mendelssohn String octet E-flat major Op. 20

Sergei Rachmaninoff -Symphonic Dances, Op. 45: great compositions/performances


Sergei Rachmaninoff –Symphonic Dances, Op. 45

Mozart Quartet No 16 K 428 Hagen Quartet: great compositions/performances


Mozart Quartet No 16 K 428 Hagen Quartet

Franz Schubert: String Quartet #10 in Eb Opp125/1 D 87 (make music part of your life series)


[youtube.com/watch?v=jTcu0Rnb3V0]

Franz Schubert: String Quartet #10 in Eb Opp125/1 D 87

 

 

 

make music part of your life series: Franz Schubert: Quartettsatz in C-moll, D. 703 and Antonín Dvořák:String Quartet No.14, Op.105


[youtube.com/watch?v=pXOp2wfBb4A]

Franz Schubert: Quartettsatz in C-moll, D. 703

Franz Schubert: Quartettsatz in C-moll, D. 703
The Quartettsatz in C-moll (English: Quartet Movement in C minor), D. 703 was composed by Franz Schubert in December 1820. It is the first movement, of a Twelfth String Quartet which Schubert never completed. In addition to the opening movement, Schubert also composed the first forty bars of a second movement marked Andante. The unfinished quartet is regarded as one of the first products of Schubert’s mature phase of composition.[1][2][3]

Structure

The composition consists of a single sonata form movement marked Allego assai and typical performances last around 10 minutes.

Antonín Dvořák:String Quartet No.14, Op.105

I. Adagio ma non troppo—Allegro appassionato
II. Molto vivace
III. Lento e molto cantabile
IV. Finale. Allegro non tanto

Shanghai Quartet

Weigang Li, violin
Yi-Wen Jiang, violin
Honggang Li, viola
Nicholas Tzavaras, cello

Alexander Kasser Theater
Montclair State University
1 Normal Avenue, Montclair, NJ 07043
3:00pm, April 12, 2013

Filmed and edited by Rodney Leinberger

make music part of your life series: Felix Bartholdy Mendelssohn – 4 pieces for String Quartet Op. 81 – III. Capriccio


[youtube.com/watch?v=p0JwIUhGtVM]

Felix Bartholdy Mendelssohn – 4 pieces for String Quartet Op. 81 – III. Capriccio  (SHARON QUARTET)

make music part of your life series: Lullaby for String Quartet, George Gershwin, Members of the LA Philharmonic, Feb 10, 2013


[youtube.com/watch?v=F3Tq07BpKgo]

Lullaby for String Quartet, George Gershwin, Members of the LA Philharmonic, Feb 10, 2013

Lullaby for String Quartet, George Gershwin, Members of the LA Philharmonic: Mischa Lefkowitz, Violin, Minyoung Chang, Violin, Michael Larco, Viola, Jason Lippmann, Cello, Baxter Concert Series, Whittier, California, February 10, 2013

make music part of your life series: Janacek – Idyll for Strings


[youtube.com/watch?v=1vKyJJEhl_4]

Janacek – Idyll for Strings

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historic musical moments: Beethoven – String Quartet No.6 in B flat major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952


[youtube.com/watch?v=2h7jnUhmlhs]

Beethoven – String Quartet No.6 in B flat major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952

Ludwig van Beethoven: The Early String Quartets, Opus 18
String Quartet No. 6 in B flat major, Op. 18, No. 6
(Streichquartett Nr. 6 in B-dur, Op. 18, Nr. 6)

I. Allegro con brio
II. Adagio ma non troppo
III. Scherzo. Allegro
IV. La Malinconia. Adagio – Allegretto quasi Allegro

Végh Quartet
Sándor Végh, 1st violin
Sándor Zöldy, 2nd violin
Georges Janzer, viola
Paul Szabo, violoncello

The 1952 Haydn Society Recordings

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“Serenade” from Make Music Part of Your Life: String Quartert Op.3 No.5 by Haydn. Andante Cantabile in C Major


[youtube.com/watch?v=k4g0FqfKxZY]

Serenade” from String Quartert Op.3 No.5 by Haydn. Andante Cantabile in C Major

David Bousso Conducts the Union City Philharmonic Strings

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Beethoven – String Quartet No.6 in B flat major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952


[youtube.com/watch?v=2h7jnUhmlhs]

Beethoven – String Quartet No.6 in B flat major, Op.18:
Végh Quartet – 1952

Ludwig van Beethoven: The Early String Quartets, Opus 18
String Quartet No. 6 in B flat major, Op. 18, No. 6
(Streichquartett Nr. 6 in B-dur, Op. 18, Nr. 6)

I. Allegro con brio
II. Adagio ma non troppo
III. Scherzo. Allegro
IV. La Malinconia. Adagio – Allegretto quasi Allegro

Végh Quartet
Sándor Végh, 1st violin
Sándor Zöldy, 2nd violin
Georges Janzer, viola
Paul Szabo, violoncello

(The 1952 Haydn Society Recordings)

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Ludwig van Beethoven‘s String Quartet No. 6 in B major was published in 1801 as opus 18, no. 6, and was written between 1798 and 1800.

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Beethoven – String Quartet No.2 in G major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952


[youtube.com/watch?v=-mqXXWJ5RpA]

Beethoven – String Quartet No.2 in G major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952

Ludwig van Beethoven: The Early String Quartets, Opus 18
String Quartet No. 2 in G major, Op. 18, No. 2
(Streichquartett Nr. 2 in G-dur, Op. 18, Nr. 2)

I. Allegro
II. Adagio cantabile — Allegro — Tempo I
III. Scherzo. Allegro
IV. Allegro molto, quasi presto

Végh Quartet
Sándor Végh, 1st violin
Sándor Zöldy, 2nd violin
Georges Janzer, viola
Paul Szabo, violoncello

The 1952 Haydn Society Recordings

 

The String Quartet No. 2 in G major, op. 18, No. 2, was written by Ludwig van Beethoven between 1798 and 1800 and published in 1801.

Of the Op. 18 string quartets, this one is the most grounded in 18th-century musical tradition.[1] According to Steinberg, “In German-speaking countries, the graceful curve of the first violin’s opening phrase has earned the work the nickname of Komplimentier-Quartett, which might be translated as ‘quartet of bows and curtseys’.”[2]

The nickname may have originated from one of Haydn’s last string quartets written about the same time (Op. 77, No. 1; 1799), which was also known as the Komplimentier-Quartett. Haydn was Beethoven’s teacher at the time, and there are similarities in style between the two quartets. They are also both in the key of G major.[3]

After he finished the quartet, Beethoven was not satisfied with the second movement and wrote a replacement. Sketches of the original slow movement survive and a complete version has been reconstructed by musicologist Barry Cooper.[4] It was performed publicly, possibly for the first time, by the Quatuor Danel in the Cosmo Rodewald Concert Hall at the Martin Harris Centre, University of Manchester, on 30 September 2011.

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Franz Schubert – String Quartet, in A minor, D 804 “Rosamunde”



Brandis Quartet, Thomas Brandis, violin. Peter Brem, violin. Wilfried Strehle, viola. Wolfgang Boettcher, cello. 
Franz Schubert – String Quartet, in A minor, D 804 “Rosamunde
I. Allegro ma non troppo
II. Andante
III. Menuetto, allegro
IV. Allegro moderato

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart / Divertimento in B-flat major, K. 137



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

Divertimento in B-flat major for string quartet, K. 137/125b (1772)
00:00 – Andante
07:52 – Allegro di molto
11:17 – Allegro assai
(Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields Chamber Ensemble (1986))

“Three early Mozart pieces, K. 137, 137 and 138, are labeled divertimentos on the manuscripts and are so listed in Grove. However, few Mozart scholars accept that tag as an accurate description of the works, and most doubt that the title came from Mozart. For one thing, a divertimento should have two minuets, and these three have none. At first glance they seem to be straightforward string quartets–yet many experts contend that they don’t sound at all like string quartets. 

So what are they? Mozart scholar Alfred Einstein fancies them as small symphonies for strings, to which the composer was prepared to add extra parts for winds; they are sometimes known as the ‘Salzburg symphonies.’ Musicologist Hans Keller has given them the curious designation of ‘orchestral quartets.’ Others insist that they are indeed string quartets even if they lack the serious temper of that rarefied form. Yet (to complete the confusion) they are universally referred to as divertimentos–the one thing everyone agrees they are not.

Whatever they’re called, they are fine examples of Mozart’s early essays in chamber music…Mozart composed them in 1772, when he was 16, not long before leaving Salzburg on his third (and, as it turned out, his last) trip to Italy. He was going to Milan to produce the opera ‘Lucio Silla‘ on a commission from Count Firmian, governor-general of that city. He probably expected, from previous experience, to need music to entertain the count’s court while he was at work on the opera. So it seems likely that these three works were composed to meet that need. Mozart may have planned to present them with a small orchestra, as Einstein surmises, but here they are played by the four instruments of a string quartet.

The Divertimento in B flat, K. 137…differs from [K. 136 & K. 138] by starting with a slow movement. This affecting ‘Andante’ is led by the first violin and is punctuated by dramatic responses from the accompanying strings. A spirited ‘Allegro di molto’ movement follows, leading to a delicate finale marked ‘Allegro assai’. This section, while not actually a minuet, has a courtly air that suggests a roomful of dancers bowing and curtsying under brilliant chandeliers.” – Harvey B. Loomis

Painting: Still Life (Morning Glories, Toad, & Insects), Otto Marseus van Schrieck

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: GEORGE WALKER: “Lyric for Strings” (Original Version)


One of Walker’s best-known early works was “Lyric” for String Orchestra. It was originally the 2nd movement, ‘Molto Adagio,’ of his String Quartet No. 1 (1946), and is performed here in that original version.
The Son Sonora String Quartet: Ashley Horne and Airi Yoshioka, violins;
Liu-Wien Ting, viola; Leo Grinhauz, cello
from Albany TROY1082 (2009)
http://www.albanyrecords.com

Chamber works from this Pulitzer Prize winning composer.
Continuing Albany Records’ series of music by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer George Walker, this recording focuses on his chamber music. The music ranges from his first string quartet composed in 1946 to the piano sonata composed in 1985. Walker is the recipient of six honorary doctoral degrees and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and was inducted into the American Classical Music Hall of Fame in 2000.
Contents:
George Walker, composer
String Quartet No. 1
Son Sonora String Quartet
George Walker, composer
String Quartet No. 2
Son Sonora String Quartet
George Walker, composer
Piano Sonata No. 4
Frederick Moyer, piano
George Walker, composer
Songs
James Martin, baritone, George Walker, piano 
Review:
“The piano sonata is a stunning, spacious work. Walker is at his finest in the songs. Each one is a gem. …James Martin’s warm baritone, concise diction, and wide variety of colors are a perfect match for these songs.” (American Record Guide)
“From this CD one would conclude that [George Walker] is versatile, technically adept, and extremely skillful at changing styles…” (Fanfare)

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Antonín Dvořák – Bagatelles, Op. 47



Alberni String Quartet.
Howard Davis, violin.
Peter Pople, violin.
Roger Best, violin/viola.
David Smith, cello.
Virginia Black, harmonium

Antonín Dvořák – Bagatelles, Op. 47
1. Allegretto scherzando 2’59
2. Tempo di menuetto, grazioso 3’16
3. Allegretto scherzando 2’56
4. Canon, andante con moto 3’27
5. Poco allegro 4’21

 

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Felix Mendelssohn – Six Anthems for eight voices a capella opus 79 – New Year



Maulbronn Chamber Choir
The night shines as the day
Conductor: Jürgen Budday

A concert recording from the church of the
UNESCO World Heritage Site Maulbronn Monastery.
Released & created by Andreas Otto Grimminger & Josef-Stefan Kindler
in cooperation with Jürgen Budday.
Juli 2010.

F. Mendelssohn: Sechs Sprüche zum Kirchenjahr.
In durchweg opulenten 8stimmigen Sätzen durchmisst Mendelssohn die Feste des Kirchenjahres vom Advent bis zu Himmelfahrt. Dabei reicht die klangliche Palette je nach Charakter des jeweiligen Festes vom dumpfen Adagio bis hin zum strahlenden, jubelnden Allegro. Inhaltlich repräsentiert insbesondere der Text der Passionszeit das Thema des Konzertes: Die “Übeltaten”, das Elend und die Sünde stehen für die negativen Seiten des Lebens, die durch Christus in der Herrlichkeit Gottes aufgehoben werden.

 

BeethoveBeethoven: String Quartet No. 5 in A Major, Op. 18, No. 5 – Julliard School (Live)



Beethoven String Quartet No. 5 in A Major, Op. 18, No. 5 performed by Julliard School (Live). Filmed live in The Jerome L. Greene Performance Space in New York for WQXR‘s Beethoven String Quartet Marathon on November 18, 2012.
Siwoo Kim and Francisco Fullana, violins
Danny Kim, viola

 

Mikhail Pletnev & Soloists Ensemble play Glinka: Grand Sextet in E flat major for piano, string quartet and double bass



Mikhail Pletnev & Soloists Ensemble play Glinka Grand Sextet in E flat major for piano, string quartet and double bass.  Recording in 1993 by Olympia.
Mikhail Pletnev, piano
Alexei Bruni, violin
Mikhail Moshkunov, violin
Andrei Kevorkov, viola
Erik Pozdeev, cello
Nikolai Gorbunov, double bass
I. Allegro
II. Andante – (attacca). 
III. Finale. Allegro con spirito

Schubert String Quartet No 14 D minor Death and the Maiden Alban Berg Quartet



Schubert String Quartet No 14 D minor Death and the Maiden

I. Allegro
II. Andante con moto –11:37 
III. Presto – 22:18
IV. Prestissimo 25:50
Composition Year 1826
Genre Categories QuartetsFor 2 violins, viola, cello

The String Quartet No. 14 in D minor, known as Death and the Maiden, by Franz Schubert, is one of the pillars of the chamber music repertoire. Composed in 1824, after the composer suffered through a serious illness and realized that he was dying, it is Schubert’s testament to death. The quartet is named for the theme of the second movement, which Schubert took from a song he wrote in 1817 of the same title; but the theme of death is palpable in all four movements of the quartet.

The quartet was first played in 1826 in a private home, and was not published until 1831, three years after Schubert’s death. Yet, passed over in his lifetime, the quartet has become a staple of the quartet repertoire. It is D. 810 in Otto Erich Deutsch‘s thematic catalog of Schubert’s works.

Original manuscript of Death and the Maiden quartet, from The Mary Flagler Cary Music Collection, Morgan Library, NY

Original manuscript of Lied Death and the Maiden

1823 and 1824 were hard years for Schubert. For much of 1823 he was sick, some scholars believe with an outburst of tertiary stage syphilis, and in May had to be hospitalized.[1] He was broke: he had entered into a disastrous deal with Diabelli to publish a batch of works, and received almost no payment; and his latest attempt at opera, Fierabras, was a flop. In a letter to a friend, he wrote,

“Think of a man whose health can never be restored, and who from sheer despair makes matters worse instead of better. Think, I say, of a man whose brightest hopes have come to nothing, to whom love and friendship are but torture, and whose enthusiasm for the beautiful is fast vanishing; and ask yourself if such a man is not truly unhappy.”[2]
English: Oil painting of Franz Schubert, after...

English: Oil painting of Franz Schubert, after an 1825 watercolor (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Franz Schubert in 1825 (painting by Wilhelm August Rieder)

Yet, despite his bad health, poverty and depression, Schubert continued to turn out the tuneful, light and gemütlichmusic that made him the toast of Viennese society: the song cycle Die schöne Müllerin, the octet for string quartet, contrabass, clarinet, horn and bassoon, more than 20 songs, and numerous light pieces for piano.[3

Alban Berg Quartet

 
 
Alban Berg Quartett
Origin ViennaAustria
Genres Classical
Occupations Chamber ensemble
Years active 1971–2008
Labels TeldecEMI
 
Members Günter Pichler (violin)
Gerhard Schulz (violin)
Isabel Charisius (viola)
Valentin Erben (violoncello)
 
Past members Klaus Maetzl (2nd violin, 1971-1978)
Hatto Beyerle (viola, 1971-1981)
Thomas Kakuska (viola, 1981-2005)

The Alban Berg Quartett was a string quartet founded in Vienna, Austria in 1970, named after the famous composer Alban Berg.

Beethoven : String Quartet n°8 in F Major, op. 59-2 “Razumovsky”, Barylli Quartet



Recording of the Barylli Quartet playing Beethoven’s String Quartet n°8 in E Minor, op. 59-2 “Razumovsky“.

I. Allegro
II. Molto Adagio (11:01)
III. Allegretto (25:17)
IV. Presto (34:58)

Mozaartsaal Konzerthaus – 1956

 

Beethoven String Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Op. 130 (Grosse Fuge) – American String Quartet



Beethoven String Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Op. 130 (Grosse Fuge) performed by the American String Quartet (live). Filmed live in The Jerome L. Greene Performance Space in New York for WQXR‘s Beethoven String Quartet Marathon on November 18, 2012.

 

Drolc Quartet – Alexander Borodin, String Quartet No. 2



Eduard Drolc and Juergen Pnarmann, violin;
Stefano Passaggio, viola;
Georg Donderer, cello.  

The String Quartet No. 2, written in 1881, by Alexander Borodin is a work in four movements:
1. Allegro moderato in D major and 2/2 time, with 304 bars;
2. Scherzo. Allegro in F major and 3/4 time, with 299 bars;
3. Notturno (Nocturne): Andante in A major and 3/4 time, with 180 bars;
4. Finale: Andante — Vivace in D major and 2/4 time, with 671 bars.

 

Friday Night at the Concert: Dvorak: String Quartet No. 13 in G major (Prague String Quartet)


1. Allegro moderato (0:07)
2. Adagio ma non troppo (9:26)
3. Molto vivace (20:25)
4. Finale (26:59)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Antonín Dvořák composed his String Quartet No. 13 in G majorOp. 106, (B. 192), between November and December 9, 1895. 1895 was an eventful year for him: he returned to Europe from America and his sister-in-law and first love both died. Upon finishing the String Quartet No. 13 in G major, he took back up his fourteenth in A-flat major, which he had begun before this quartet and finished it on December 30 of that year. The fourteenth quartet was published with the opus number 105.

The string quartet contains four movements and lasts around 35 minutes. The movements are as follows:

  • Allegro moderato in G major and 2/4 time
  • Adagio ma non troppo in E-flat major and 3/8 time
  • Molto vivace in B minor and 3/4 time, more like a rondo with episodes in A flat major and D major for trios than a typical scherzo, as is more often found in this place in a string quartet in the Romantic music era.
  • Finale. Andante sostenuto – Allegro con fuoco The brief Andante sostenuto is in 4/4 “common” time, introduces a finale in 2/4 time, and interrupts it toward the end of the work. The finale is in the work’s main key of G major.

Jerusalem Quartet – W.A. Mozart String Quartet no.4 in C major KV 157 II. Andante


Jerusalem Quartet:
Alexander Pavlovsky, 1st violin
Sergei Bresler, 2nd violin
Amichai Grosz, viola
Kyril Zlotnikov, violoncello

The third “Milanese” Quartet (1772/3)

Mozart String Quartet no.4 in C major KV 157, II. Andante

Smetana – From My Life – string quartet


string quartet by B. Smetana – From My Life
15th December 2009
Beirut, Lebanon
Nabih Bulos – violin
Ondin Brezeanu – violin
Magdalena Sokola – cello
Catalina Rupa – viola

Today’s Birthday: Joseph Haydn (1732)


Joseph Haydn (1732)

The principal shaper of the Classical style, Haydn was an Austrian composer who exerted major influence on his contemporaries, including Mozart, and future composers. The first great symphonist, he composed 106 symphonies and virtually invented the string quartet. By his later years, he was recognized internationally as the greatest living composer. He composed important works in almost every genre. As a teacher, Haydn had a difficult relationship with what famous student? More… Discuss