Tag Archives: Subway

New at euzicasa Widget: Environmental Working Group (Access here)


Environmental Working Group

Environmental Working Group (you’re one click away)

 

 

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Let’s learn from Voni: http://foodbabe.com/subway/ Azodicarbonamide: banned in the rest of the world…striving in our food…Question: WHY?


[youtube.com/watch?v=lHjm8lbgc3I]
Visit:  http://foodbabe.com/subway/
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Azodicarbonamide
Identifiers
CAS number 123-77-3 Yes
PubChem 31269
ChemSpider 4575589 Yes
UNII 56Z28B9C8O Yes
EC-number 204-650-8
ChEMBL CHEMBL28517 Yes
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C2H4N4O2
Molar mass 116.08 g mol−1
Appearance Yellow to orange/red crystalline powder
Hazards
MSDS External MSDS
EU classification Harmful (XN)
R-phrases R42 R44
S-phrases S22 S24 S37
NFPA 704
NFPA 704.svg
1
2
2
 
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Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
Infobox references

Azodicarbonamide, or azobisformamide, is a chemical compound with the molecular formula C2H4O2N4.[1] It is a yellow to orange red, odorless, crystalline powder. As a food additive, it is known by the E number E927.

Use as a food additive

Azodicarbonamide is used as a food additive, a flour bleaching agent and improving agent. It reacts with moist flour as an oxidizing agent.[2] The main reaction product is biurea,[3] a derivative of urea, which is stable during baking. Secondary reaction products include semicarbazide[4] and ethyl carbamate.[5] The United States permits the use of azodicarbonamide at levels up to 45 ppm.[6] In Australia[citation needed] the use of azodicarbonamide as a food additive is banned. In Singapore, use is punishable by up to 15 years in prison and a fine of $450,000[citation needed].

Other uses

The principal use of azodicarbonamide is in the production of foamed plastics as an additive. The thermal decomposition of azodicarbonamide results in the evolution of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and ammonia gases, which are trapped in the polymer as bubbles to form a foamed article.

Azodicarbonamide as used in plastics, synthetic leather and other uses can be pure or modified. This is important because modification affects the reaction temperatures. Pure azodicarbonamide generally reacts around 200 °C, but there are some products that the reaction temperature must be lower, depending on the application. In the plastic, leather and other industries, modified azodicarbonamide (average decomposition temperature 170 °C) contains additives that accelerate the reaction or react at lower temperatures.

Azodicarbonamide as a blowing agent in plastics has been banned in Europe since August 2005 for the manufacture of plastic articles that are intended to come into direct contact with food.[7]

Safety

In the United States, azodicarbonamide has generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status and is allowed to be added to flour at levels up to 45 ppm.[8]

In the UK, the Health and Safety Executive has identified azodicarbonamide as a respiratory sensitizer (a possible cause of asthma) and determined that products should be labeled with “May cause sensitisation by inhalation.”[9] TheWorld Health Organization has linked azodicarbonamide to “respiratory issues, allergies and asthma.” Britain, Europe, and Australia now ban its use in food.[10]

Toxicological studies of the reactions of azodicarbonamide show that it is rapidly converted in dough to biurea, which is a stable compound not decomposed upon cooking.[11]

 

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The Power of Petitioning: Subway Takes Chemical Out of Sandwich Bread After Protest – ABC News


PHOTO: Vani Hari, the "food babe" blogger, is petitioning Subway to take a plastic chemical out of its bread.Subway Takes Chemical Out of Sandwich Bread After Protest – ABC News.

[youtube.com/watch?v=lHjm8lbgc3I]

 

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This Day in the Yesteryear: THE FIRST UNDERGROUND LINE OF THE NEW YORK CITY SUBWAY OPENS (1904)


The First Underground Line of the New York City Subway Opens (1904)

Now an integral part of New York City culture, the NYC subway opened its first underground line in 1904—about 35 years after service began on the first elevated line. The subway’s early popularity was highlighted in songs like “Take the ‘A’ Train” and publicity contests like “Miss Subways.” Millions of people now ride the city’s subways every day, consistently crowding some trains well beyond capacity. What 1888 natural disaster boosted support for the creation of an underground transit system? More… Discuss

 

Eric Serra – Drumskate (“Subway”)