Tag Archives: Supreme Court

Anti-Catholic history in US shows Church has survived and will continue, historian says: CNA


.- As bishops warn of current threats to religious liberty in the United States, Catholics can take heart that such challenges have faced them before, and they have persevered, one Church historian says.

“It’s okay to realize that other people have gone on this same journey, a journey that’s involved persecution, a journey that’s involved a Catholic minority and a non-Catholic majority, and sometimes friction with governments,” said Fr. David Endres, assistant professor of Church history and historical theology at The Athenaeum of Ohio, in an interview with CNA.

“I think it’s important to remember the history, if nothing more than to realize that this is ground that has already been tread by our forefathers,” he added.

“Now is the time to take heart and realize that the compass of the Scriptures and Tradition now need to be emphasized more than ever as our guide; that we cannot look to politicians, we can’t look to the government, we certainly cannot look to pop culture and the media as our guide for morality.”

Fr. Endres spoke with CNA during the Fortnight for Freedom, a two-week campaign by the U.S. bishops to educate Catholics about religious freedom and the current threats to the public practice of religion in the nation.

Among the threats the bishops have warned of in recent years are the contraception mandate in the Affordable Care Act, and Catholic adoption agencies being forced out of business because they will not place children with same-sex couples as mandated by state anti-discrimination laws.

The bishops recently voiced grave concerns over the Supreme Court’s recent marriage decision Obergefell v. Hodges, which established same-sex marriage in all 50 states.

Although the majority opinion “makes a nod” toward religious freedom, it does not mention the First Amendment’s protection of the free exercise of religion and this is very troubling, Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore told reporters on a conference call after the decision. Archbishop Lori chairs the U.S. bishops’ Ad Hoc Committee on Religious Liberty.

“The free exercise of religion means that we have a right not only to debate it openly in the public square, but to operate our ministries and to live our lives in accordance to the truth about marriage without violence, or being penalized, or losing our tax exemption, or losing our ability to serve the common good through our social services and through education,” he said in the June 26 conference call.

The omission of “free exercise” in the Court’s majority opinion thus “could give rise to a lot of legal controversies,” Archbishop Lori warned. Without guarantees of the free exercise of religion, religiously-affiliated organizations which oppose same-sex marriage and businesses who cannot serve same-sex weddings could face legal challenges.

The current threats to religious liberty – state and federal laws regulating the free exercise of religion of charitable institutions – are eerily similar to a Supreme Court case from nearly a century ago, and Catholics should take note, Fr. Endres explained.

In 1922, Oregon passed a law forcing all children between the ages of eight and sixteen in parochial and private schools into public schools. The law, the Compulsory Education Act of 1922, was supported by the Ku Klux Klan as a measure to push for standard American education and to prevent what they saw as a foreign influence – the Catholic Church – from educating immigrant children.

The Society of Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary, along with a military private school, fought the law in court. Three years later, in Pierce v. Society of Sisters, the Supreme Court resoundingly struck down the law in a unanimous decision, ruling that it violated the freedom of parents to send their children to parochial schools.

In the history of the U.S., this was perhaps the event that bears the closest resemblance to the present-day struggle between Catholic institutions maintaining their religious freedom, and state and federal laws looking to regulate their consciences, Fr. Endres said.

However, the law is also but one incident in a U.S. history that is checkered with anti-Catholic bigotry and violence. In “Sticks, Stones, and Broken Bones: the History of anti-Catholic Violence in the U.S.”, a 2014 article in Homiletic and Pastoral Review, Fr. Endres detailed just how rocky has been Catholicism’s relationship with mainstream American culture.

Colonial-era laws forbade Catholics from becoming lawyers and teachers. In Maryland, Catholic parents could be fined for sending their children to Europe to receive a Catholic education. Distribution of anti-Catholic pamphlets and literature was commonplace.

Once European emigration to the U.S. increased in the 1840s and 50s, this established a largely Catholic minority of Irish and Germans.

Anti-Catholicism was mingled with xenophobia as the mainstream individualist culture was quite suspicious of Catholicism. Consequently, some U.S. residents tried to ensure that immigrants would not gain positions of power. A political party surfaced that at its root was anti-Catholic, the “Know-Nothing Party.”

Convents and churches were victim to mob violence in multiple cases. Two Philadelphia parishes were burned in 1844 after rumors circulated that Catholics were trying to oust Protestant bibles from public schools.

The visit of a papal ambassador from Bl. Pius IX to report on the state of the Church in the U.S. resulted in violent unrest in multiple cities, including the burning of the ambassador’s effigy.

Anti-Catholic violence waxed and waned through the years, but Catholics had never felt they fully “made it” in American society until the election of John F. Kennedy, an Irish Catholic, to the presidency. Afterward, many devout Catholics thought they would be accepted as a permanent part of the American mainstream culture.

“We felt like we had kind of come of age in this country,” Fr Endres told CNA. “And that in general, we were not on the fringes.”

The recent threats to religious liberty are proving more and more that this Catholic peace was a reprieve and not a permanent acceptance of Catholicism in the U.S., he added.

Why has there been so much anti-Catholic sentiment in the United States? The overall conflict between the Church and American culture has centered on freedom and authority, and the fault line still exists today, Fr. Endres explained.

“I would say part of it is the role of individuals vis a vis community and the Church has always upheld quite a communal emphasis,” he said. Historically, the mainstream American culture promoted individualism, and looked down on Catholics who followed the authority of the Bishop of Rome.

This conflict also extends to the debate of the role of community versus the freedom of the individual, he added.

“We have this strange idea that’s developed in this country that freedom means absolute autonomy of persons. And the Church has never believed that true freedom consisted of absolute autonomy, but instead, basically a relationship with God and with one another. We kind of have this path set before us that yes, we are responsible to other people. We are responsible to God in a special way, and absolute autonomy has no place in that kind of worldview.”

Historically, this played out in the Protestant individualistic culture of the U.S. against the Catholic view of community and authority.

This push for absolute autonomy has played out in the push for acceptance of same-sex marriage and of the transgender movement.

On the other side is a Christian anthropology, he said: “how we view our being made in the image and likeness of God, how we view marriage and family life, gender, sexuality, all those kinds of things.”

The question then becomes, “do I have an obligation to anyone but myself?” Fr. Endres asked rhetorically.

“The modern notion would be ‘it’s just you,’” whereas a Christian recognizes that he has an obligation to obey and love God and the Church, and to love his neighbor.

And Catholics are once again being moved to the margins, with laws prohibiting them from publicly practicing their religion and remaining true to Church teaching on sexuality.

However, “it’s important for us to realize then that to be on the margins of society is not always a bad thing,” he added.

The present hostility to Catholic teaching on sexuality might actually be a “call instead to remain faithful on the margins,” he said, because the Catholic faith is counter-cultural.

“We are speaking a truth that is not always popular, but which we believe very strongly comes from Christ and more broadly from the revelation of God to man. And if you really believe that, you can’t accommodate.”

Throughout U.S. history, some Catholics have remained faithful to the Church, while others accommodated to the culture. For example, some German Catholic immigrants and priests in the 19th century left the Church to become Protestant because they couldn’t endure the anti-Catholic hostility.

“Americanists,” the subjects of the 1899 encyclical Testem benevelentiae nostrae of Leo XIII, were American Catholics who had been so affected by the American culture that they were no longer authentically Catholic. This problem exists today.

“Americanism shows that more or less constant feature of American Catholic history, where Catholics have to make that choice of whether they are going to identify primarily as American, and then Catholic secondarily, or Catholic as a primary identity and American as a second,” Fr. Endres said.

“So what’s going to be the noun, and what’s going to be the adjective?”

Tags: Religious freedom, Fortnight for Freedom, Supreme Court, Religious liberty, SCOTUS, Obergefell v. Hodges, US Catholic history

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US bishops encourage Catholics to maintain witness to the truth of marriage :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


By Matt Hadro and Adelaide Mena

Washington D.C., Jun 26, 2015 / 11:15 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Catholics are called to witness to the truth of marriage despite the Supreme Court of the United States recognizing a legal right to same-sex marriage, the nation’s bishops said on Friday.

“Regardless of what a narrow majority of the Supreme Court may declare at this moment in history, the nature of the human person and marriage remains unchanged and unchangeable,” said Archbishop Joseph Kurtz of Louisville, president of the U.S bishops conference, in a June 26 statement for the conference.

“Jesus Christ, with great love, taught unambiguously that from the beginning marriage is the lifelong union of one man and one woman,” Archbishop Kurtz added. “As Catholic bishops, we follow our Lord and will continue to teach and to act according to this truth.”

In a 5-4 decision on Friday, the Supreme Court ruled in Obergefell v. Hodges that under the Fourteenth Amendment, states must grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples and recognize same-sex marriages conducted in other states.

The Fourteenth Amendment protects the rights of all citizens to “life, liberty, or property” under due process, and guarantees them “equal protection of the laws” in the states. In this case, the court ruled that state laws defining marriage as between one man and one woman deprived same-sex couples of their right to legally marry.

The ruling overturned a November decision by the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals that upheld traditional marriage laws in Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Same-sex marriage is now legal in all fifty states.

Although the Court recognizes a legal right to same-sex marriage, Catholics must teach and bear witness to true marriage, the bishops insisted.

“The unique meaning of marriage as the union of one man and one woman is inscribed in our bodies as male and female,” Archbishop Kurtz reflected.

“Mandating marriage redefinition across the country is a tragic error that harms the common good and most vulnerable among us, especially children. The law has a duty to support every child’s basic right to be raised, where possible, by his or her married mother and father in a stable home.”

Despite the ruling, Catholics should continue to preach the truth about the nature of marriage with “faith, hope, and love” for all persons, and asked “all people of good will” to join Catholics in supporting this proclamation and respecting Catholics’ “freedom to seek, live by, and bear witness to the truth”

The decision “will not end the discussion about what marriage is and why it matters for public policy,” stated Jennifer Marshall, vice president for the Institute for Family, Community, and Opportunity at the Heritage Foundation.

Along with this support for true marriage, considerable social and legal obstacles will now have to be overcome as a result of the Obergefell decision, legal experts admitted.

“Redefining marriage to make it a genderless institution fundamentally changes marriage,” said Ryan Anderson, the William E. Simon senior research fellow in American Principles and Public Policy at the Heritage Foundation.

“It makes the relationship more about the desires of adults than about the needs, or the rights, of children,” he added.

The Supreme Court also played “activist” in re-defining marriage, an issue that should have been left to the state-level democratic process said Caleb Dalton, a legal counsel with Alliance Defending Freedom.

The Court “invented a new constitutional right,” Dalton told CNA in an interview shortly after the decision.

“The Fourteenth Amendment does not speak to what marriage is, and today the Supreme Court decided that it knows better than millions of Americans what the best social policy for the United States is.”

The decision pushes legal same-sex marriage on a collision course with religious liberty at the national level, and the consequences for religious freedom could be severe, Dalton noted.

This conflict has been occurring in states where same-sex marriage has already been legalized, with business owners facing discrimination lawsuits when they decline to serve same-sex weddings for religious reasons.

Now that same-sex marriage is legal nationwide, more lawsuits like this could occur.

“It’s redefinition of marriage like this that will continue to impact religious liberty of Americans across our country and it’s concerning,” Dalton said.

Anderson stated, “There is an urgent need for policy to ensure the government never penalizes anyone for standing up for marriage.”

“We must work to protect the freedom of speech, association, and religion of those who continue to abide by the truth of marriage as one man and one woman.”

Tags: Gay Marriage, Supreme Court, SCOTUS, Obergefell v. Hodges

via US bishops encourage Catholics to maintain witness to the truth of marriage :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Breaking: Supreme Court redefines marriage throughout US :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Washington D.C., Jun 26, 2015 / 08:07 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In a wide-reaching decision, the U.S. Supreme Court has declared that same-sex “marriage” is a constitutional right and that states must recognize same-sex unions contracted as marriages in other states.

By a vote of 5-4, the court ruled June 26 that states must recognize same-sex “marriages” under the 14th Amendment, and recognize such unions contracted in other states.

The decision in Obergefell v. Hodges dealt with claims that Ohio’s marriage law discriminated by not recognizing same-sex unions contracted as marriages in other states. Several other states were also facing similar cases on the constitutionality of state marriage laws.

Backers of marriage as a union of one man and one woman argued that marriage is intrinsically connected to the procreation of children and cannot be redefined. Some also said the matter should be left to the people and the states and not decided in court when so much disagreement on the matter persists.

Backers of “gay marriage” asserted a fundamental right to marry whomever one loves, saying that failure to redefine marriage amounts to decimation.

Same-sex “marriage” was not firmly established in any U.S. state until 2004, after a Massachusetts court ruled that the state must give marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

In response to that ruling, some had called for a federal constitutional amendment to protect the definition of marriage. Voters in 30 states have passed constitutional amendments and referenda strengthening the legal definition of marriage as a union of one man and one woman. Many of these efforts have been overturned in state or federal court challenges.

In 2013, the Supreme Court dismissed an appeal from supporters of California’s defense-of-marriage amendment, Proposition 8, which California officials had refused to defend in court. The Supreme Court said that the appeal did not have legal standing and allowed a lower state court’s overruling of the proposition to take effect.

The Supreme Court itself has declined to review several recent appeals seeking to defend state marriage laws against lower court decisions.

Also in 2013, a 5-4 ruling from the Supreme Court struck down aspects of the 1996 federal Defense of Marriage Act. The court claimed that a provision defining marriage as a union of one man and one woman for federal purposes violated the U.S. constitution’s equal protection guarantees. The ruling said that the federal government must recognize “gay marriages” in individual states if the states choose to recognize them.

The Defense of Marriage Act had passed Congress overwhelmingly and was signed into law by President Bill Clinton after a Hawaii court ruling briefly recognized such unions.

Increasing requirements for recognition of same-sex unions as marriages, combined with state anti-discrimination laws, have caused growing conflict with religious freedom.

Parents in some school districts have faced difficulty in exempting their children from classes voicing approval of same-sex relationships, while small businesses with moral reservations about participating in same-sex ceremonies have faced discrimination lawsuits. Catholic-run adoption agencies have been forced to close because the law would require them to place children with same-sex couples against their religious beliefs.

The consequences for religious freedom were a topic of the court’s deliberations in Obergefell v. Hodges. U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verilli at one point acknowledged that the high court’s approval of a legal right to same-sex “marriage” could mean problems for the tax-exempt status of colleges with objections to recognizing the unions.

Tags: Gay Marriage, Marriage, Supreme Court, Redefining Marriage

via Breaking: Supreme Court redefines marriage throughout US :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
March 19

1687   The French explorer La Salle is murdered in by his own men while searching for the mouth of the Mississippi, along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico.
1702   On the death of William III of Orange, Anne Stuart, sister of Mary, succeeds to the throne of England, Scotland and Ireland.
1822   Boston is incorporated as a city.
1879   Jim Currie opens fire on the actors Maurice Barrymore and Ben Porter near Marshall, Texas. His shots wound Barrymore and kill Porter.
1903   The U.S. Senate ratifies the Cuban treaty, gaining naval bases in Guantanamo and Bahia Honda.
1916   The First Aero Squadron takes off from Columbus, NM to join Gen. John J. Pershing and his Punitive Expedition against Pancho Villa in Mexico.
1917   The Adamson Act, eight hour day for railroad workers, is ruled constitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court.
1918   Congress authorizes Daylight Savings Time.
1920   The U.S. Senate rejects the Versailles Treaty for the second time.
1924   U.S. troops are rushed to Tegucigalpa as rebel forces take the Honduran capital.
1931   The state of Nevada legalizes gambling.
1935   The British fire on 20,000 Muslims in India, killing 23.
1936   The Soviet Union signs a pact of assistance with Mongolia against Japan.
1944   The German 352nd Infantry Division deploys along the coast of France.
1945   Adolf Hitler orders a scorched-earth policy for his retreating German armies in the west and east.
1947   Chiang Kai-Shek’s government forces take control of Yenan, the former headquarters of the Chinese Communist Party.
1949   The Soviet People’s Council signs the constitution of the German Democratic Republic, and declares that the North Atlantic Treaty is merely a war weapon.
1963   In Costa Rica, President John F. Kennedy and six Latin American presidents pledge to fight Communism.
1977   Congo President Marien Ngouabi is killed by a suicide commando.
1981   One technician is killed and two others are injured during a routine test on space shuttle Columbia.
Born on March 19
1589   William Bradford, governor of Plymouth colony for 30 years.
1721   Tobias George Smollett, satirical author and physician (Roderick Random, Humphrey Clinker).
1813   David Livingston, explorer found by Arthur Stanley in Africa.
1821   Sir Richard Burton, English explorer.
1848   Wyatt Earp, U.S. marshal.
1849   Alfred von Tirpitz, Prussian admiral who commanded the German fleet in early World War I.
1860   William Jennings Bryan, orator, statesman, known as “The Great Communicator.”
1889   Sarah Gertrude Millina, South African writer (The Dark River, God’s Stepchildren).
1891   Earl Warren, governor of California, later 14th Supreme Court Chief Justice.
1904   John J. Sirica, U.S. Federal Judge who ruled on Watergate issues.
1906   Adolf Eichman, Nazi Gestapo officer.
1912   Adolf Galland, German Luftwaffe pilot.
1925   Brent Scrowcroft, Lt. Gen. (USAF), National Security Advisor to President George H.W. Bush.
1933   Phillip Roth, American novelist and short-story writer (Portnoy’s Complaint).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.hycB6CdM.dpuf

today’s birthday: Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933)


Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933)

Nicknamed the “Thurgood Marshall of women’s rights,” Ruth Bader Ginsburg graduated at the top of her class at Columbia Law School in 1959. During the 1970s, she became the first tenured female professor at Columbia, led the Women’s Rights Project, and won several important Supreme Court cases before she was appointed to the US Court of Appeals in 1980. Confirmed as a justice of the Supreme Court in 1993, she was the second woman to sit on the nation’s highest bench. Who was the first? More… Discuss

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History: March 9, 2015


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
March 9

1617   The Treaty of Stolbovo ends the occupation of Northern Russia by Swedish troops.
1734   The Russians take Danzig (Gdansk) in Poland.
1788   Connecticut becomes the 5th state.
1796   Napoleon Bonaparte marries Josephine de Beauharnais in Paris, France.
1812   Swedish Pomerania is seized by Napoleon.
1820   Congress passes the Land Act, paving the way for westward expansion.
1839   The French Academy of Science announces the Daguerreotype photo process.
1841   The rebel slaves who seized a Spanish slave ship, the Amistad, in 1839 are freed by the Supreme Court despite Spanish demands for extradition.
1862   The first and last battle between the ironclads U.S.S. Monitor and C.S.S. Virginia ends in a draw.
1864   General Ulysses Grant is appointed commander-in-chief of the Union forces.
1911   The funding for five new battleships is added to the British military defense budget.
1915   The Germans take Grondno on the Eastern Front.
1916   Mexican bandit Pancho Villa leads 1,500 horsemen on a raid of Columbus, N.M. killing 17 U.S. soldiers and citizens.
1932   Eamon De Valera is elected president of the Irish Free State and pledges to abolish all loyalty to the British Crown.
1936   The German press warns that all Jews who vote in the upcoming elections will be arrested.
1939   Czech President Emil Hacha ousts pro-German Joseph Tiso as the Premier of Slovakia in order to preserve Czech unity.
1940   Britain frees captured Italian coal ships on the eve of German Foreign Minister, Ribbentrop’s visit to Rome.
1956   British authorities arrest and deport Archbishop Makarios from Cyprus. He is accused of supporting terrorists.
1957   Egyptian leader Nasser bars U.N. plans to share the tolls for the use of the Suez Canal.
1959   The Barbie doll is unveiled at a toy fair in New York City.
1964   The first Ford Mustang rolls off the Ford assembly line.
1967   Svetlana Alliluyeva, Josef Stalin’s daughter defects to the United States.
1968   General William Westmoreland asks for 206,000 more troops in Vietnam.
1975   Iraq launches an offensive against the rebellious Kurds.
1986   Navy divers find the crew compartment of the space shuttle Challenger along with the remains of the astronauts.
Born on March 9
1451   Amerigo Vespucci, Italian navigator.
1824   Leland Stanford, railroad builder, founder of Stanford University.
1890   Vyacheslav Molotov, former Soviet Prime Minister.
1892   Vita Sackville-West, writer.
1905   Peter Quennell, biographer.
1910   Samuel Barber, American composer (“Adagio for Strings,” Vanessa).
1918   Frank Morrison Spillane [Mickey Spillane], crime writer (Kiss Me, Deadly, The Erection Set).
1930   Ornette Coleman, jazz saxophonist.
1934   Yuri Gagarin, Russian cosmonaut, the first man to orbit the Earth.
1943   Bobby Fischer, first American world chess champion.
1947   Keri Hulme, New Zealand novelist (The Bone People).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.JCRGYiGo.dpuf

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

March 6

1521   Ferdinand Magellan discovers Guam.
1820   The Missouri Compromise is enacted by Congress and signed by President James Monroe, providing for the admission of Missouri into the Union as a slave state, but prohibits slavery in the rest of the northern Louisiana Purchase territory.
1836   After fighting for 13 days, the Alamo falls.
1853   Giuseppe Verdi’s opera La Traviata premieres in Venice.
1857   The Supreme Court’s Dred Scott decision holds that blacks cannot be citizens.
1860   While campaigning for the presidency, Abraham Lincoln makes a speech defending the right to strike.
1862   The USS Monitor left New York with a crew of 63, seven officers and 56 seamen.
1884   Over 100 suffragists, led by Susan B. Anthony, present President Chester A. Arthur with a demand that he voice support for female suffrage.
1888   Louisa May Alcott dies just hours after the burial of her father.
1899   Aspirin is patented following Felix Hoffman’s discoveries about the properties of acetylsalicylic acid.
1901   A would-be assassin tries to kill Wilhelm II of Germany in Bremen.
1914   German Prince Wilhelm de Wied is crowned as King of Albania.
1916   The Allies recapture Fort Douamont in France during the Battle of Verdun.
1928   A Communist attack on Beijing results in 3,000 dead and 50,000 fleeing to Swatow.
1939   In Spain, Jose Miaja takes over Madrid government after a military coup and vows to seek “peace with honor.”
1943   British RAF fliers bomb Essen and the Krupp arms works in the Ruhr, Germany.
1945   Cologne, Germany, falls to General Courtney Hodges’ First Army.
1947   Winston Churchill opposes the withdrawal of troops from India.
1948   During talks in Berlin, the Western powers agree to internationalize the Ruhr region.
1953   Upon Josef Stalin’s death, Georgi Malenkov is named Soviet premier.
1960   The Swiss grant women the right to vote in municipal elections.
1965   The United States announces that it will send 3,500 troops to Vietnam.
1967   President Lyndon B. Johnson announces his plan to establish a draft lottery.
1973   President Richard Nixon imposes price controls on oil and gas.
1975   Iran and Iraq announce that they have settled the border dispute.
1980   Islamic militants in Tehran say that they will turn over the American hostages to the Revolutionary Council.
1981   President Reagan announces plans to cut 37,000 federal jobs.
1987   The British ferry Herald of Free Enterprise capsizes in the Channel off the coast of Belgium. At least 26 are dead.
Born on March 6
1475   Michelangelo Buonarroti, painter, sculptor and architect.
1806   Elizabeth Barret Browning, poet (Sonnets from the Portuguese).
1831   Philip Henry Sheridan, Union Army general.
1885   Ring Lardner, writer (You Know Me, Al).
1899   Richard Leo Simon, publisher, partner of Max Schuster.
1908   Lou Costello, American comedian, partner of Bud Abbott.
1928   Gabriel Garcia-Marquez, Columbian-born novelist (One Hundred Years of Solitude, Love in the Time of Cholera).
1937   Valentina Nikolayeva-Tereshkova, Russian astronaut, the first woman to orbit the Earth.
1944   Dame Kiri Te Kannawa, operatic soprano.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.HK6jCXPB.dpuf

this day in the yesteryear: Marbury v. Madison Establishes Judicial Review (1803)


Marbury v. Madison Establishes Judicial Review (1803)

Marbury v. Madison was a landmark case in American law that resulted in the first decision by the Supreme Court to declare unconstitutional and void an act passed by Congress. It established the basis for the exercise of judicial review of federal statutes by the US Supreme Court. By identifying the Supreme Court as the authoritative interpreter of the Constitution, this decision bolstered power, respect, and prestige in the federal judiciary. Who were the “Midnight Judges”? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: US Supreme Court Decides Bush v. Gore (2000)


US Supreme Court Decides Bush v. Gore (2000)

The Supreme Court’s decision in this case ended Florida‘s statewide recount of ballots cast in the 2000 US presidential election and allowed its Secretary of State to certify Republican candidate George W. Bush as the winner of Florida’s 25 electoral votes. Despite the fact that Democratic candidate Al Gore had won the popular vote, the decision in Florida gave Bush a majority of the Electoral College and with it the US presidency. What reason did the court cite for stopping the recount? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Jacques Chirac (1932)


Jacques Chirac (1932)

Chirac, a French political leader, was president of France from 1995 to 2007, served twice as prime minister, and was the mayor of Paris for nearly two decades. As president, he sought to reduce unemployment, cut the deficit, and strengthen ties with Germany. In the early 2000s, Chirac was implicated in a number of corruption scandals, and, in 2011, he was convicted on corruption charges. In 2002, Chirac survived an attempt on his life during celebrations of what French national holiday? More… Discuss

this pressed-for your information: Supreme Court blocks Texas abortion restrictions|via The Truth 24.com


 via The Truth 24.com:

Supreme Court blocks Texas abortion restrictions

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday blocked certain restrictions on abortion contained in a Texas state law.

The high court granted a request filed by abortion rights groups that puts on hold parts of a federal appeals court decision that had allowed the law to go into effect.

The brief court order said that requirements that clinics have certain hospital-like settings for surgeries could not go into effect pending appeal.

The order also said that a provision that requires abortion practitioners to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles (48 km) of the clinic could not be enforced for clinics in McAllen and El Paso, cities near the Mexican border. The provision will be in force in the rest of the state.

Abortion rights groups have said the regulations are unnecessary and served as a veiled attempt to shut abortion clinics. Supporters of the law say the rules would reduce complications and improve patient care.

Three conservatives on the nine-justice high court, Antonin Scalia, Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito, said they would have allowed the law to go into effect in full.

The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans said on Oct. 2 that Texas could begin enforcing both requirements.

Abortion rights groups have said the measures as a whole would shutter all but seven clinics in the state of more than 26 million people.

(Reporting by Lawrence Hurley; Editing by Will Dunham)

this day in history


Lead Story
Building of Hoover Dam begins, 1930
American Revolution
Battle of Hubbardton, 1777
Automotive
Stock car driver Kenny Irwin Jr. dies in crash, 2000
Civil War
Kit Carson’s campaign against the Indians, 1863
Cold War
Samantha Smith leaves for visit to the USSR, 1983
Crime
Mary Surratt is first woman executed by U.S. federal government, 1865
Disaster
Tanker accident causes deadly fire, 1987
General Interest
The impeachment of Senator Blount, 1797
U.S. occupies Iceland, 1941
Female cadets enrolled at West Point, 1976
O’Connor nominated to Supreme Court, 1981
Terrorists attack London transit system at rush hour, 2005
Hollywood
Johnny Depp stars in second Pirates of the Caribbean movie, 2006
Literary
Birthday of Sherlock Holmes’ sidekick, Dr. Watson, 1852
Music
“The Stripper,” by David Rose, becomes the #1 pop hit in America, 1962
Old West
Warren Earp killed in Arizona, 1900
Presidential
Future President Jimmy Carter marries, 1946
Sports
Jim Thorpe begins Olympic triathlon, 1912
Vietnam War
China announces it will provide aid to Hanoi, 1955
New ambassador arrives in Saigon, 1964
First U.S. troops withdrawn from South Vietnam, 1969
World War I
British Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps is officially established, 1917
World War II
Himmler decides to begin medical experiments on Auschwitz prisoners, 1942

this day in the yesteryear: Revolt Aboard the Amistad (1839)


Revolt Aboard the Amistad (1839)

In 1839, 53 African slaves being transported on the Spanish merchant ship La Amistad revolted against their captors. Having gained control of the ship, they demanded that the navigator set a course for Africa. However, he deceived them and sailed the ship northward until it was intercepted by the US Navy off the coast of New York. After a widely publicized court battle, the Supreme Court ruled that the Africans were not legally slaves and ordered them freed. What does amistad mean? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Texas v. Johnson Decided (1989)


Texas v. Johnson Decided (1989)

Texas v. Johnson was a decision by the Supreme Court of the United States that invalidated prohibitions on desecrating the American flag. The opinion of the court came down as a controversial 5-4 decision, with the majority opinion written by William J. Brennan, Jr. In it, the Supreme Court answered the question of whether the desecration of an American flag, by burning or otherwise, is a form of speech protected under the First Amendment. What arguments did the justices make? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Brandeis Sworn in as Justice of US Supreme Court (1916)


Brandeis Sworn in as Justice of US Supreme Court (1916)

Brandeis was an American lawyer and the author of the “Brandeis Brief,” a report that detailed the impact of long working hours on women and revolutionized the practice of law. He was also a leader of the American Zionist movement. Appointed to the Supreme Court by Woodrow Wilson in 1916, he served until 1939 and was the first Jew to hold that office. Brandeis University, a liberal arts university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, is named after him. Why was he called the “people’s lawyer”? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: Brown v. Board of Education Decided (1954)


Brown v. Board of Education Decided (1954)

In 1951, a class action suit was filed against the Board of Education of the City of Topeka, Kansas, by 13 African-American parents on behalf of their children. The plaintiffs argued that segregating schools along racial lines violated the students’ 14th Amendment right to equal protection under the law. The case was heard by the US Supreme Court, which unanimously agreed that “separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” What future Supreme Court judge represented the plaintiffs? More… Discuss

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How the Obamacare wars hurt the mentally ill | MSNBC (in war there are no victors!)


Scott Patrick, 48, stops for a mid-day coffee in downtown Atlanta. How the Obamacare wars hurt the mentally ill | MSNBC.

The partisan war over Obamacare is now threatening the mental health services that Patrick and countless others are seeking. The president’s health care law cuts federal subsidies to safety-net hospitals that were expected to have more paying patients under the law’s Medicaid expansion and insurance exchanges. But Republican-controlled states like Georgia have refused to go along with the expansion. That’s turned safety-net providers like Grady into unintended casualties—and mental health services for Georgia’s most troubled residents are first on the chopping block. 

It was never meant to happen this way. States like Georgia, which has the nation’s sixth-highest uninsured rate, were supposed to be the biggest beneficiaries of the new Medicaid dollars.  But in 2012, the Supreme Court unexpectedly ruled that the federal government couldn’t force states to accept the expansion. 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: ROE V. WADE DECISION LEGALIZES ABORTION IN THE US (1973)


Roe v. Wade Decision Legalizes Abortion in the US (1973)

Roe v. Wade was the landmark Supreme Court case that legalized abortion in the US. In 1970, an unmarried pregnant woman—who was at the time identified only as Jane Roe—filed a lawsuit because she wanted an abortion but could not legally get one in Texas. Her suit aimed to have the Texas abortion law declared unconstitutional as an invasion of her right to privacy as guaranteed by the 1st, 4th, 5th, 9th, and 14th Amendments. How does Norma McCorvey—”Jane Roe”—view the case today? More… Discuss

 

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