Tag Archives: Symphony No. 4 (Brahms)

Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

(September 8, 1988, Luzern)

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Beethoven – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55) Eroica Berliner Philharmoniker: make music part of your life series


Beethoven – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55) Eroica Berliner Philharmoniker

Ludwig van Beethoven Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55):
Berliner Philharmoniker

Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55), is a landmark musical work marking the full arrival of the composer’s “middle-period,” a series of unprecedented large scale works of emotional depth and structural rigor.
The symphony is widely regarded as a mature expression of the classical style of the late eighteenth century that also exhibits defining features of the romantic style that would hold sway in the nineteenth century. The Third was begun immediately after the Second, completed in August 1804, and first performed 7 April 1805.
Instrumentation
The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B flat, 2 bassoons, 3 horns in E flat, 2 trumpets in E flat and C, timpani in E flat and B flat, and strings.
Form
The piece consists of four movements:
1. Allegro con brio
2. Marcia funebre: Adagio assai in C minor
3. Scherzo: Allegro vivace
4. Finale: Allegro molto

Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

September 8, 1988, Luzern

 

 

great compositions/performances: F. Schubert – Symphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 (Harnoncourt)


[youtube.com/watch?v=CnoI-sYtCOU]

F. SchubertSymphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 Conductor – Nikolaus Harnoncourt
Wiener Philharmoniker
Musikvereinssaal Wien

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The symphony has four movements (a performance lasts around 30 minutes.)
  1. Adagio molto – Allegro vivace
  2. Andante in A flat major
  3. Menuetto. Allegro vivace – Trio in E flat major
  4. Allegro

The Symphony No. 4 in C minor, D. 417, commonly called the Tragic (German: Tragische), was composed by Franz Schubert in April 1816.[1] It was completed one year after the Third Symphony, when Schubert was 19 years old. However, the work was premiered only on November 19, 1849, in Leipzig, more than two decades after Schubert’s death.[citation needed]

The title Tragic is Schubert’s own. It was added to the autograph manuscript some time after the work was completed.[1] It is not known exactly why he added the title, but the work is one of only two symphonies (the Unfinished Symphony is the other) which Schubert wrote in a minor key.

The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 4 horns in A-flat, C and E-flat, 2 trumpets in C and E-flat, timpani and strings.

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Great Compositions/Performances: Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker


Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

September 8, 1988, Luzern

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 




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The Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98 by Johannes Brahms is the last of his symphonies. Brahms began working on the piece in Mürzzuschlag. then in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, in 1884, just a year after completing his Symphony No. 3, and completed it in 1885.

Instrumentation

The symphony is scored for two flutes (one doubling on piccolo), two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, contrabassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani, triangle (third movement only), and strings

Reception

The work was given its premiere in Meiningen on October 25, 1885 with Brahms himself conducting. The piece had earlier been given to a small private audience in a version for two pianos, played by Brahms and Ignaz Brüll. Brahms’ friend and biographer Max Kalbeck, reported that the critic Eduard Hanslick, acting as one of the page-turners, exclaimed on hearing the first movement at this performance: “For this whole movement I had the feeling that I was being given a beating by two incredibly intelligent people.”[2] Hanslick later spoke more approvingly of it, however.[citation needed]

Progressive rock group Yes‘ keyboardist Rick Wakeman used part of the symphony on the instrumental “Cans and Brahms” from the 1971 album Fragile

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