Tag Archives: Taiwan

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

January 28

28   The Roman Emperor Nerva names Trajan, an army general, as his successor.
1547   Henry VIII of England dies and is succeeded by his nine-year-old son Edward VI.
1757   Ahmed Shah, the first King of Afghanistan, occupies Delhi and annexes the Punjab.
1792   Rebellious slaves in Santo Domingo launch an attack on the city of Cap.
1871   Surrounded by Prussian troops and suffering from famine, the French army in Paris surrenders. During the siege, balloons were used to keep contact with the outside world.
1915   The U.S. Coast Guard is founded to fight contraband trade and aid distressed vessels at sea.
1915   The German navy attacks the U.S. freighter William P. Frye, loaded with wheat for Britain.
1921   Albert Einstein startles Berlin by suggesting the possibility of measuring the universe.
1932   The Japanese attack Shanghai, China, and declare martial law.
1936   A fellow prison inmate slashes infamous kidnapper, Richard Loeb, to death.
1941   French General Charles DeGaulle‘s Free French forces sack south Libya oasis.
1945   Chiang Kai-shek renames the Ledo-Burma Road the Stilwell Road, in honor of General Joseph Stilwell.
1955   The U.S. Congress passes a bill allowing mobilization of troops if China should attack Taiwan.
1964   The Soviets down a U.S. jet over East Germany killing three.
1970   Israeli fighter jets attack the suburbs of Cairo.
1986   The space shuttle Challenger explodes just after liftoff.
Born on January 28
1693   Anna “Ivanovna”, Tsarina of Russia.
1706   John Baskerville, inventor of the “hot-pressing” method of printing.
1853   Jose Marti, Cuban poet and journalist, known as the “Apostle of the Cuban Revolution.”
1912   Jackson Pollock, influential abstract expressionist painter.

this day in the yesteryear: Taipei 101 Becomes World’s Tallest Building (2003)


Taipei 101 Becomes World’s Tallest Building (2003)

On October 17, 2003, a pinnacle placed atop Taiwan‘s Taipei 101 allowed it to surpass the height of what had once been the tallest buildings in the world—the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia—by 184 feet (56 m). Designed to withstand typhoons and earthquakes, Taipei 101 houses a massive pendulum suspended from the 92nd floor to counteract swaying. Its elevators set a record in 2004 with top ascending speeds of about 37 mph (60 km/h). What is currently the world’s tallest structure? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Taiwan Armed Forces Day


Taiwan Armed Forces Day

Founded in 1955, Armed Forces Day in Taiwan honors the country’s military and celebrates their victory over the Japanese in World War II (called the War of Resistance in Taiwan). The day is marked by military parades featuring special units chosen for their precision and outstanding performance. A troop-cheering by the onlookers is part of the celebration, as are educational activities covering the history of the war period and the role of the Taiwanese military in defeating the enemy. The day is also marked by the members of the armed forces having a rare day off from work. More… Discuss

Deadly Plane Crash in Taiwan


Deadly Plane Crash in Taiwan

In further tragic airline news, a TransAsia Airways flight crashed while trying to land in bad weather, killing more than 40 of the 54 people on board. The plane had departed Kaohsiung in southern Taiwan on Wednesday afternoon, heading for Magong on Penghu Island. Many flights that day had been canceled due to strong winds and rain brought by Typhoon Matmo, but warnings had been lifted prior to the plane’s departure, and inclement weather at the time of the crash did not exceed international regulations for landing. More… Discuss

Gunpowder tea (green tea): From Wikipedia


Gunpowder tea

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

China-Zhejiang.pngGunpowder tea (; pinyin: zhū chá) is a form of green Chinese tea produced in Zhejiang Province of China in which each leaf has been rolled into a small round pellet. It is believed to take its English name from the fact that the tea resembles grains of black powder. This rolling method of shaping tea is most often applied either to dried green tea (the most commonly encountered variety outside China) or Oolong tea.

Chinese Gunpowder Green Tea
Type: Green

Other names: Lo Chu Ch’a, Zhu Cha, 珠茶
Origin: Zhejiang Province China and others

Quick description: Popular worldwide. Flavor varies according to the growing location of tea used for production

Gunpowder tea production dates back to the Tang Dynasty 618–907. It was first introduced to Taiwan in the 19th century. Gunpowder tea leaves are withered, steamed, rolled, and then dried. Although the individual leaves were formerly rolled by hand, today most gunpowder tea is rolled by machines (though the highest grades are still rolled by hand). Rolling renders the leaves less susceptible to physical damage and breakage and allows them to retain more of their flavor and aroma. In addition, it allows certain types of oolong teas to be aged for decades if they are cared for by being occasionally roasted.

When buying gunpowder tea it is important to look for shiny pellets, which indicate that the tea is relatively fresh. Pellet size is also associated with quality, larger pellets being considered a mark of lower quality tea. High quality gunpowder tea will have small, tightly rolled pellets.[citation needed]

Varieties

When sold as a variety of tea, gunpowder tea has several varieties:

  • Pingshui gunpowder (平水珠茶): The original and most common variety of gunpowder tea with larger pearls, better color, and a more aromatic infusion, which is commonly sold as Temple of Heaven Gunpowder or Pinhead Gunpowder, the former, a common brand of this tea variety.[1][2]
  • Formosa gunpowder: A gunpowder style tea grown in Taiwan near Keelung, it is claimed to have its own characteristic aroma, different from that of Zhejiang Province gunpowder grown in mainland China. Formosa gunpowder teas are typically fresh or roasted oolongs.
  • Ceylon gunpowder: A gunpowder variant grown in Sri Lanka, usually at altitudes exceeding 1,800 metres (6,000 ft), see Green Ceylon teas.

Several types of green teas are commonly rolled into “gunpowder” form, including Chunmee, Tieguanyin, Huang Guanyin, and Dong Ding, as well as many other oolong and higher-end jasmine teas.

Etymology

In Chinese, gunpowder tea is called zhū chá (; literally “pearl tea” or “bead tea”; not to be confused with boba tea).

The origin of the English term may come from the tea’s similarity in appearance to actual gunpowder: greyish, dark pellets of irregular shape used as explosive propellant for early guns. The name may also have arisen from the fact that the grey-green leaf is tightly rolled into a tiny pellet and “explodes” into a long leaf upon being steeped in hot water. Another explanation is that the tea can also have a smoky flavor.

It is also possible that the English term may stem from the Mandarin Chinese phrase for “freshly brewed”, gāng pào de (), which sounds like the English word “gunpowder.”

Brewing methods

While brewing methods vary widely by tea and individual preferences, 1 teaspoon of looseleaf tea is recommended for every 150ml (5.07 oz) of water. Ideal water temperature for this type of tea is between 70 °C (158 °F) to 80 °C (176 °F). For the first and second brewing, leaves should be steeped for around one minute. It is also recommended that the tea cup or tea pot used should be rinsed with hot water prior to brewing the tea to warm the vessels. When brewed, gunpowder tea is a yellow color.

The flavor of brewed gunpowder tea is often described as thick and strong like a soft honey, but with a smokey flavor and an aftertaste that is slightly coppery. This type of tea is often seen as having a flavor that is somewhat grassy, minty, or peppery.

Use in the Maghreb

Moroccan tea ritual

Gunpowder tea is exported to the Maghreb where it is used in the preparation of traditional North African mint tea. The Moroccan tea ritual is at the heart of any social gathering, from an informal visit to a neighbour to lavish soirees with dignitaries. A minimum of two cups need to be drunk so as not to offend the host. Moroccan mint tea is made by adding mint and sugar or honey to gunpowder tea after brewing.

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE 228 MASSACRE (1947)


The 228 Massacre (1947)

Following Japan‘s defeat in World War II, Taiwan was placed under the administrative control of the Republic of China. The transition did not go smoothly. The Taiwanese had been content under Japanese rule and quickly grew to resent the heavy-handed tactics of the Kuomintang. On February 27, 1947, a dispute between a cigarette vendor and authorities escalated the next day into an anti-government uprising that was violently suppressed. How many Taiwanese are thought to have been massacred? More… Discuss

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2014 Taipei Midnight Fireworks | New Year’s Eve Fireworks Full Show HD Demonstration


Published on Dec 31, 2013

Fireworks Display in Taipei 101 Full show Full HD Full show!
Please leave a like if you enjoyed!
Thanks for watching!

New Year’s Eve Fireworks 2013 | Taipei Taiwan | Australia [31 Dec 2012]

12 AM Midnight Taipei New Year’s Eve Fireworks 2013 With Awesome Fireworks! [Televised Program]

– Braydeeeee

Happy New Year – Welcome 2013
Date Of Shooting – 31 Dec 2012
Time – 12 am Midnight
Location – Taiwan Sydney Melbourne Tokyo Taipei Hong Kong China Beijing Thailand Moscow Москва Новый год Фейерверки Spain fuegos artificiales London Dubai / Burj Khalifa Paris New York Time Square Vancouver Montreal Seattle San Francisco Los Angeles SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL Rio De Janeiro استراليا

2012-2013 Midnight Fireworks | Taipei, Taiwan (Full Show) (HD) 
2012-2013 Midnight Fireworks | Taipei, Taiwan (Full Show) (HD) 
2012-2013 Midnight Fireworks | Taipei, Taiwan (Full Show) (HD) 
2012-2013 Midnight Fireworks | Taipei, Taiwan (Full Show) (HD) 

2012-2013 Midnight Fireworks | Taipei
2012-2013 Midnight Fireworks | Taipei
2012-2013 Midnight Fireworks | Taipei
2012-2013 Midnight Fireworks | Taipei

Taipei Real New Year’s Eve Fireworks 2013 年台北101跨年煙火
Taipei Real New Year’s Eve Fireworks 2013 年台北101跨年煙火
Taipei Real New Year’s Eve Fireworks 2013 年台北101跨年煙火

 

Taiwan museum unveils controversial Ai Weiwei art (from France 24 International)


Taiwan museum unveils controversial Ai Weiwei art (from France 24 International)

Taiwan museum unveils controversial Ai Weiwei art (from France 24 International) (click here to follow the story at France24 Intenational)Ai Weiwei " Forever Bicycles"