Tag Archives: tchaikovsky

great compositions/performances: Symphony No. 2 in C Minor, Op. 17 “Little Russian” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky


Symphony No. 2 in C Minor, Op. 17 “Little Russian” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Advertisements

make music part of your llife series: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet – Fantasy Overture


The Nutcracker


]

The Nutcracker

The Nutcracker, a celebrated ballet by Tchaikovsky, tells the story of a young girl whose Christmas gift of a nutcracker turns into a prince and leads her to a magical land. In 1954, George Balanchine choreographed and premiered his New York City Ballet version, which was later made into a feature film. Mikhail Baryshnikov choreographed another enormously popular version for the American Ballet Theatre. What novel instrument did Tchaikovsky use in the Nutcracker score? More… Discuss
[embedhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1nzCDUNf-0[/embed]

The Nutcracker Suite (Full Album) – Tchaikovsky

Published on Oct 27, 2014

If you enjoyed this music please Like and Subscribe: http://goo.gl/LRQnxp
Purchase Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker Highlights here: http://goo.gl/Q0CWjH
Purchase Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker – Complete Ballet here: http://goo.gl/IkNYcE
Download Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker – Complete Ballet mp3 here: http://goo.gl/IkNYcE

Song titles for Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker in order:
1. Op. 71 – 2. March 0:00
2. Op. 71 – 4. Dance 2:47
3. Op. 71 – 5. Scene & The Grandfather Dance
4. Op. 71 – 6. Scene
5. Op. 71 – 7. Scene
6. Op. 71 – 8. Scene
7. Op. 71 – 12. Arabian Dance, “Coffee”
8. Op. 71 – 13. Waltz Of The Flowers
9. Op. 71 – 14. Pas De Deux
10. Op. 71 – 15. Closing Waltz & Grand Finale

Pyotr Tchaikovsky – Souvenir de Florence ,great compositions/performances


Pyotr Tchaikovsky – Souvenir de Florence

Symphony No. 2 in C Minor, Op. 17 “Little Russian” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra Yuri Temirkanov, conductor, great compositions/performances


Tchaikovsky – Suite No. 4 in G major “Mozartiana”, Op. 61 (FULL)


Tchaikovsky – Suite No. 4 in G major “Mozartiana“, Op. 61 (FULL)

Published on Apr 29, 2014

The Orchestral Suite No. 4, Op. 61, more commonly known as Mozartiana, is an orchestral suite by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, written in 1887 as a tribute to Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on the 100th anniversary of that composer’s opera Don Giovanni. Because this suite consists of four orchestrations of piano pieces by (or in one case, based on) Mozart, Tchaikovsky did not number this suite with his previous three suites for orchestra. Instead, he considered it a separate work entitled Mozartiana. Nevertheless, it is usually counted as No. 4 of his orchestral suites.

Tchaikovsky conducted the premiere himself, in Moscow in November 1887. It was the only one of his suites he conducted, and only the second at whose premiere he was present.

Pyotr Iliyich Tchaikovsky (May 7, 1840 — November 6, 1893) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. His wide-ranging output includes symphonies, operas, ballets, instrumental, chamber music and songs. He wrote some of the most popular concert and theatrical music in the classical repertoire, including the ballets Swan Lake, The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, the 1812 Overture, his First Piano Concerto, his last three numbered symphonies, and the opera Eugene Onegin.

Born into a middle-class family, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant, despite his obvious musical precocity. He pursued a musical career against the wishes of his family, entering the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1862 and graduating in 1865. This formal, Western-oriented training set him apart from the contemporary nationalistic movement embodied by the influential group of young Russian composers known as The Five, with whom Tchaikovsky’s professional relationship was mixed.
Free video background: http://www.free-video-footage.com

 

Tchaikovsky – Andante Cantabile for Cello and String Orchestra


Tchaikovsky – Andante Cantabile in B major,  for Cello and String Orchestra

Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra , great compositions/performances


Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra

Tchaikovsky: 1812 Overture, Op. 49 Herbert Von Karajan & Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra , great compositions/performances



Tchaikovsky: 1812 Overture, Op. 49 Herbert Von Karajan & Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

Tchaikovsky: 1812 Overture, Op. 49 Herbert Von Karajan & Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra (1966)

Video made by Maarten Kroon @ Hollandsk Gjestehus in Vinstra (Norway) / Our guesthouse website link: http://www.hollandskgjestehus.com / Tel.: +47 61290045.
*************************************************************************
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

 

 

Barbirolli – Arensky: Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky,: great compositions/performances


[embes]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRKiE8o3NQU[/embed]

Barbirolli – Arensky: Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky (improved sound)

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 6 “Pathetique”, Op. 74 (Fedoseyev),: great compositions/performances


P. I. TchaikovskySymphony No. 6 “Pathetique”, Op. 74 (Fedoseyev)

None but the Lonely Heart – Pyotr Tchaikovsky, make music part of your life series


None but the Lonely Heart – Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Tchaikovsky String Quartet Op. 11 – II. Andante cantabile (Kontras Quartet): great compositions/performances


Éléonore Darmon et Éric Astoul jouent Tchaikovsky “Souvenir d’un Lieu Cher” op. 42: make music part of your life series


Éléonore Darmon et Éric Astoul jouent TchaikovskySouvenir d’un Lieu Cher” op. 42 

Tchaikovsky-Violin Concerto in D Major Op. 35: Great compositions/performances


Tchaikovsky-Violin Concerto in D Major Op. 35 (Complete)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
 

The Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35, was written by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky in 1878. It is one of the best known violin concertos, and is considered one of the most technically difficult works for the violin.

Tchaikovsky.gif

Composition

Tchaikovsky (right) with violinist Iosif Kotek

The piece was written in Clarens, a Swiss resort on the shores of Lake Geneva, where Tchaikovsky had gone to recover from the depression brought on by his disastrous marriage to Antonina Miliukova. He was working on his Piano Sonata in G major but finding it heavy going. Presently he was joined there by his composition pupil, the violinist Iosif Kotek, who had been in Berlin for violin studies with Joseph Joachim. The two played works for violin and piano together, including a violin-and-piano arrangement of Édouard Lalo‘s Symphonie espagnole, which they may have played through the day after Kotek’s arrival. This work may have been the catalyst for the composition of the concerto.[1] He wrote to his patroness Nadezhda von Meck, “It [the Symphonie espagnole] has a lot of freshness, lightness, of piquant rhythms, of beautiful and excellently harmonized melodies…. He [Lalo], in the same way as Léo Delibes and Bizet, does not strive after profundity, but he carefully avoids routine, seeks out new forms, and thinks more about musical beauty than about observing established traditions, as do the Germans.”[2] Tchaikovsky authority Dr. David Brown writes that Tchaikovsky “might almost have been writing the prescription for the violin concerto he himself was about to compose.”[3]

Tchaikovsky made swift, steady progress on the concerto, as by this point in his rest cure he had regained his inspiration, and the work was completed within a month despite the middle movement getting a complete rewrite (a version of the original movement was preserved as the first of the three pieces for violin and piano, Souvenir d’un lieu cher).[4] Since Tchaikovsky was not a violinist, he sought the advice of Kotek on the completion of the solo part.[5] “How lovingly he’s busying himself with my concerto!” Tchaikovsky wrote to his brother Anatoly on the day he completed the new slow movement. “It goes without saying that I would have been able to do nothing without him. He plays it marvelously.”[6]

One Hour of Music – The Greatest Waltzes of All Time: great compositions/performances


One Hour of Music – The Greatest Waltzes of All Time

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev) Erudite Music Channel: make music part of your life series


P. I. TchaikovskySerenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev)

Aleksandr Glazunov: Symphony no.6 op.58 (Gennadij Rozhdestvenskij, conductor): make music part of your life series


Aleksandr Glazunov: Symphony no.6 op.58 (Gennadij Rozhdestvenskij, conductor)

Parts/Movements

  1. Adagio – Allegro passionato
  2. Tema con varazioni
  3. Intermezzo. Allegretto
  4. Finale. Andante maestoso

Review :

While the Symphony No. 6 in C minor, Op. 58, of 1896 by Alexander Glazunov is not the most personally characteristic of his eight completed symphonies — the optimistic Third or the Olympian Fifth are more typical of his confident symphonic aesthetic — it is arguably the most typically Russian of his symphonies. Part of the reason for this is the scoring — violins in octaves above massed brass at its climaxes à la Tchaikovsky and gorgeously colorful woodwind writing in its central movements — part of it is the themes — ardent and powerful with a yearning quality characteristic of fin de siècle Russian symphonies — but most of it is the furious tone of the opening movement.
******With the darkly unfolding Adagio leading into a Allegro appassionato that balances a passionately despairing first theme with a fervently supplicating second theme, Glazunov’s Sixth sounds like a Russian symphony composed after the death of Tchaikovsky. But the Sixth is more than the work of a symphonic epigone. While the tone of the opening movement sounds typically Russian, its chromatic melodic and cogent harmonic structure makes it sound much more modern than contemporary symphonies by Kalinnikov or even Rachmaninov. Even more modern are the Sixth’s second and fourth movements.
******The second movement is a theme and seven variations that slowly transmutes the tone of the symphony from the fury of the opening movement to one of calm acceptance.
******The brief third-movement Intermezzo that precedes the Finale is lighter in tone than anything else in the symphony.
******The Finale itself is one of Glazunov’s most successful closing movements. With its magisterial Andante maestoso introduction announcing the chorale theme that will ultimately cap the movement, its highly contrasted themes — the first confidently striding in the winds Moderato maestoso, the second a lilting Scherzando theme for the flutes, horns, and strings — the Finale seems at first too episodic to cohere. Glazunov’s superb technical skills, however, form all the Finale’s material into an organic whole and the tone of the Finale — powerfully positive — is altogether Glazunov’s own. ~ James Leonard, Rovi

Read more:
               http://www.answers.com/topic/symphony-no-6-in-c-minor-op-58#ixzz3AkekJ1oA

               http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/5a0988a4-695c-4bff-bc68-4f312427495e.html
              http://www.allmusic.com/composition/symphony-no-6-in-c-minor-op-58-mc0002366895

 

Symphony No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 13 “Winter Dreams” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: make music part of your life series


Symphony No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 13 “Winter Dreams” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

FROM

Peter Tchaikovsky: Variations on a Rococo Theme Op 33 (make music part of your life series)


[youtube.com/watch?v=NSCslGqxCVQ]
Peter Tchaikovsky: Variations on a Rococo Theme Op 33
DIMITRI MASLENNIKOV (cello),
Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester, Berlin
CHRISTOPH ESCHENBACH (conductor)

great compositions/performances: Barbirolli – Arensky: Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky


[youtube.com/watch?v=tRKiE8o3NQU]

Barbirolli – Arensky: Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky

***London Symphony Orchestra
(Recorded in 1947)

John Barbirolli
Born: 12/2/1899 – Holborn, London, England
Died: 7/29/1970 – London, England

Anton Stepanovich Arensky (Russian: Антон Степанович Аренский) (12 July 1861 — 25 February 1906), was a Russian composer of Romantic classical music, a pianist and a professor of music.

Arensky was born in Novgorod, Russia. He was musically precocious and had composed a number of songs and piano pieces by the age of nine. With his mother and father, he moved to Saint Petersburg in 1879, where he studied composition at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory with Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. After graduating from the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1882, Arensky became a professor at the Moscow Conservatory. Among his students there were Alexander Scriabin, Sergei Rachmaninoff and Alexander Gretchaninov. In 1895 Arensky returned to Saint Petersburg as the director of the Imperial Choir, a post for which he had been recommended by Mily Balakirev. Arensky retired from this position in 1901, spending his remaining time as a pianist, conductor, and composer. Arensky died of tuberculosis in a sanatorium in Perkjärvi, Finland. It is alleged that drinking and gambling undermined his health.

Pyotr Tchaikovsky was the greatest influence on Arensky’s musical compositions. Indeed, Rimsky-Korsakov said, “In his youth Arensky did not escape some influence from me; later the influence came from Tchaikovsky. He will quickly be forgotten.” The perception that he lacked a distinctive personal style contributed to long-term neglect of his music, though in recent years a large number of his compositions have been recorded. Especially popular are the orchestral Variations on a Theme of Tchaikovsky based on one of Tchaikovsky’s Songs for Children, Op. 54.

great compositions/performances: Barbirolli – Arensky: Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky (improved sound)


[youtube.com/watch?v=tRKiE8o3NQU]

Barbirolli – Arensky: Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky

London Symphony Orchestra
Recorded in 1947

John Barbirolli in the mid-1960s

John Barbirolli in the mid-1960s (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

John Barbirolli
Born: 12/2/1899 – Holborn, London, England
Died: 7/29/1970 – London, England

Anton Stepanovich Arensky (Russian: Антон Степанович Аренский) (12 July 1861 — 25 February 1906), was a Russian composer of Romantic classical music, a pianist and a professor of music.

Anton Arensky, 1895

Anton Arensky, 1895

Arensky was born in Novgorod, Russia. He was musically precocious and had composed a number of songs and piano pieces by the age of nine. With his mother and father, he moved to Saint Petersburg in 1879, where he studied composition at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory with Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. After graduating from the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1882, Arensky became a professor at the Moscow Conservatory. Among his students there were Alexander Scriabin, Sergei Rachmaninoff and Alexander Gretchaninov. In 1895 Arensky returned to Saint Petersburg as the director of the Imperial Choir, a post for which he had been recommended by Mily Balakirev. Arensky retired from this position in 1901, spending his remaining time as a pianist, conductor, and composer. Arensky died of tuberculosis in a sanatorium in Perkjärvi, Finland. It is alleged that drinking and gambling undermined his health.

Pyotr Tchaikovsky was the greatest influence on Arensky’s musical compositions. Indeed, Rimsky-Korsakov said, “In his youth Arensky did not escape some influence from me; later the influence came from Tchaikovsky. He will quickly be forgotten.” The perception that he lacked a distinctive personal style contributed to long-term neglect of his music, though in recent years a large number of his compositions have been recorded. Especially popular are the orchestral Variations on a Theme of Tchaikovsky based on one of Tchaikovsky’s Songs for Children, Op. 54.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Clara Schumann: Piano Concerto Op. 7 – Francesco Nicolosi


[youtube.com/watch?v=bt_X-t1mX40]

Clara Schumann: Piano Concerto Op. 7 – Francesco Nicolosi

Parts/Movements

  1. Allegro maestoso
  2. Romanze. Andante non troppo, con grazia
  3. Finale. Allegro non troppo
Clara Schumann
Clara Schumann 1878.jpg

Portrait by Franz von Lenbach, 1878
Born Clara Josephine Wieck
13 September 1819
Leipzig
Died 20 May 1896 (aged 76)
Frankfurt, German Empire
Cause of death
Stroke
Nationality German
Occupation Pianist, composer
Spouse(s) Robert Schumann (m. 1840; wid. 1856)
Children Eight

Clara Schumann (née Clara Josephine Wieck; 13 September 1819 – 20 May 1896) was a German musician and composer, considered one of the most distinguished pianists of the Romantic era. She exerted her influence over a 61-year concert career, changing the format and repertoire of the piano recital and the tastes of the listening public. Her husband was the composer Robert Schumann. Together they encouraged Johannes Brahms, and she was the first pianist to give public performances of some of Brahms’s works, notably the Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Handel.[1]

Continue reading

Make Music PArt of Your Life: Pyotr Tchaikovsky – Souvenir de Florence



The String Sextet in D minor “Souvenir de Florence“, Op. 70, is a string sextet scored for 2 violins, 2 violas, and 2 cellos composed in the European summer of 1890 by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Tchaikovsky dedicated the work to the St. Petersburg Chamber Music Society in response to his becoming an Honorary Member. The work, in the traditional four-movement form, was titled “Souvenir de Florence” because the composer sketched one of the work’s principal themes while visiting Florence, Italy, where he composed The Queen of Spades. The work was revised between December 1891 and January 1892, before being premiered in 1892.

1. Allegro con spirito (00:00)
2. Adagio cantabile e con moto (10:16)
3. Allegretto moderato (19:56)
4. Allegro con brio e vivace (26:11)

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Yo-Yo Ma: Tchaikovsky “Andante Cantabile” (live)


Great Compositions/Performances:  Yo-Yo Ma: Tchaikovsky “Andante Cantabile” (live)
Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra‘s opening night gala concert, October 2005. Sir Andrew Davis, conductor

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Tchaikovsky Suite No.4 ‘Mozartiana’



Tchaikovsky 
Suite No.4 in G major Op.61 ’Mozartiana

1 Gigue
2 Menuet
3 Preghiera
4 Theme and Variations

The Philharmonia Orchestra
Michael Tilson Thomas

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Tchaikovsky Nutcracker Suite – Russian Dance Trepak



The Russian Dance from Tchaikovsky’s famous Nutcracker Suite. This is probably not only my favourite of all the movements, and I hope you’ll enjoy it!

 

Igor Zhukov plays Tchaikovsky “Christmas”


Igor Zhukov plays TchaikovskyChristmas

 

Tchaikovsky : Symphony No.2 in C minor, Op.17 “Little Russian”



Tchaikovsky, Symphony No. 2Little Russian“Royal Concertgebouw OrchestraBernard Haitink

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: 
 
 Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky‘s Symphony No. 2 in C minor, Op. 17 was composed in 1872. One of Tchaikovsky’s joyful compositions, it was successful right from its premiere and also won the favor of the group of nationalistic Russian composers known as “The Five“, led by Mily Balakirev. Because Tchaikovsky used three Ukrainian folk songs to great effect in this work, it was nicknamed the “Little Russian” (Russian: Малороссийская, Malorossiyskaya) by Nikolay Kashkin, a friend of the composer as well as a well-known musical critic of Moscow.[1] Ukraine was at that time frequently called “Little Russia“.
  1. Andante sostenuto — Allegro vivo (C minor).
    A solo horn playing a Ukrainian variant of “Down by Mother Volga” sets the atmosphere for this movement. Tchaikovsky reintroduces this song in the development section, and the horn sings it once more at the movement’s conclusion. The rather vigorous second subject utilises a melody which would also be used subsequently by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov in his Russian Easter Festival Overture. The end of the exposition, in the relative E-flat major, leads straight into the development, in which material from both themes is heard. A long pedal note leads back to the second subject. Unusually, Tchaikovsky does not repeat the first subject theme in its entirety in this section, as is conventional, but instead uses it solely for the coda.
  2. Andantino marziale, quasi moderato (E-flat major).
    This movement was originally a bridal march Tchaikovsky wrote for his unpublished opera Undine. He quotes the folk song “Spin, O My Spinner” in the central section.
  3. ScherzoAllegro molto vivace (C minor).
    Fleet and scampering, this movement does not quote an actual folk song but sounds folk song-like in its overall character. It takes the form of a da capo scherzo and trio with a coda.
  4. Finale. Moderato assai — Allegro vivo (C major).
    After a brief but expansive fanfare, Tchaikovsky quotes the folk song “The Crane”, subjecting it to an increasingly intricate and colorful variations for orchestra. A more lyrical theme from the strings provides contrast before the symphony ends in a rousing C major conclusion.

Despite its initial success, Tchaikovsky was not satisfied with the symphony. Continue reading

TCHAIKOVSKY_Meditation Op. 72 No. 5



P.I.Tchaikovsky – Meditation Op.72 No.5, Piano – Tomona Miyazakihttp://tomona.jp

Tchaikovsky – The Tempest – Fantasy Overture


Tchaikovsky – The Tempest – Fantasy Overture

Tchaikovsky: Romeo & Juliet / Gergiev · London Symphony Orchestra · BBC Proms 2007


Great presentation of russian Maestro Valery Gergiev with the London Symphony Orchestra, playing Tchaikovsky’s Romeo & Juliet at BBC Proms 2007.

(C) BBC and ALL their respective owners. No personal work here.

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev)



P. I. TchaikovskySerenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (1880):
1. Pezzo in forma di sonatina: Andante non troppo — Allegro moderato
2. Valse: Moderato — Tempo di valse
3. Élégie: Larghetto elegiaco
4. Finale (Tema russo): Andante — Allegro con spirito

Moskow Radio Symphony Orchestra
Conductor – Vladimir Fedoseyev
Recorded live at the Alte Oper Frankfurt, 1991