Tag Archives: Temperature

July One of Hottest Months on Record


July One of Hottest Months on Record

The eastern US and central Asia had a significantly cooler-than-average July, but they were the only two regions on Earth that did. For the globe as a whole, it was the fourth-hottest month on record—surpassed only by the Julys of 1998, 2005, and 2010—and the 353rd consecutive month with an above average global temperature. The blistering July temperatures came hot on the heels of both the hottest May and hottest June ever recorded. More… Discuss

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NEWS: TURN DOWN THE THERMOSTAT TO TRIM THE WAISTLINE (Or exercise, indoors, outdoors, to the same result!)


Turn Down the Thermostat to Trim the Waistline

A number of factors have been blamed for the obesity crisis gripping much of the industrialized world, and now researchers are adding indoor heating to the list. They say that heated buildings eliminate the need for the body to expend energy in order to keep warm, thereby reducing daily caloric burn. Other experts disagree, saying that cooler temperatures increase appetite, counteracting any caloric burn with an increased caloric intake. There is also some indication that cold indoor temperatures increase the risk of a stroke. More… Discuss

 

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This Day in the Yesteryear: THE GREAT BLUE NORTHER (1911)


The Great Blue Norther (1911)

The central US is no stranger to sudden changes in weather, but the temperature fluctuations and weather phenomena that struck on November 11, 1911, were about as unusual as it gets. On that day, many cities experienced record high temperatures before the mercury plummeted to record lows. Springfield, Missouri, for example, was a balmy 80°F (27°C) before the cold front passing through the region brought it down to a frigid 13°F (-11°C). What else did the front bring with it? More…Discuss

 

Generator Seizure Forces ‘Occupy’ Creativity At Occupy Wall Street: Via Associated Press


After firefighters seized power generators and gas cans from Occupy Wall Street protestors, the demonstrators were forced to come up with a creative solution to power their laptop computers and mobile phones. (Oct. 31)

And this is how the history is written and these are the heroes!

Fair Weather, By George


Fair Weather, (By George)

 

My dad was the first meteorologist who could do more than just predict the weather. He enjoyed fishing, hobby that he shared with me mostly on summer vacations.

This story is about fair weather, the way he was able to intervene in the complicated business of making an unforgettable sunny day.

 “Dad, do you think it’s going to rain tomorrow, like it did yesterday?” I asked him, concerned about the eventuality of not being able to fulfill our well planned outing. “No, he said”, as if totally sure of the truthfulness of his statement.

“How can you be so sure?”, I asked, since I did not have any knowledge of the science of weather prediction.  “Because I took care of it”, he answered without any hesitation. “You know that hole in the attic’s wall?” he went on saying, “The one facing east?” “Yeah”, I said? “Well, you see, about an hour ago, when you were still asleep, I went up there, in the attic, with one of those  long poles grandma was using to grow the beans  on, and a handful of hay. I wrapped the hay around the tip of the pole, and reach out to the hole in the sky thru which the clouds enter. I waited then for a few minutes, while all the clouds left the sky thru the hole to the West, and quickly I plugged that one too with some hay. So tomorrow, you see, will be sunny, no clouds in the sky what so ever. Will pack our rain coats just as a precaution, but will not have an opportunity to wear them, I promise you.”

I was five years old.  I heard many stories throughout the years about ways to predict the weather, from the circles around the Sun, and the Moon, and the height at which swallows fly  or the way the Sun wink back at us with his last red glowing ray, before it goes to sleep beyond the horizon, the stillness of air, and many more. But this practical way to create a special father-son fishing expedition will always stay with me, treasured and cherished as wisdom of age, wisdom of ages.

4 more dead from heat-related causes – Chicago Tribune


4 more dead from heat-related causes - Chicago Tribune

4 more dead from heat-related causes - Chicago Tribune

Tips for Preventing Heat-Related Illness

The best defense is prevention. Here are some prevention tips:

  • Photo of athlete drinking water.Drink more fluids (nonalcoholic), regardless of your activity level. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Warning: If your doctor generally limits the amount of fluid you drink or has you on water pills, ask him how much you should drink while the weather is hot.
     
  • Don’t drink liquids that contain alcohol or large amounts of sugar–these actually cause you to lose more body fluid. Also, avoid very cold drinks, because they can cause stomach cramps.
     
  • Stay indoors and, if at all possible, stay in an air-conditioned place. If your home does not have air conditioning, go to the shopping mall or public library–even a few hours spent in air conditioning can help your body stay cooler when you go back into the heat. Call your local health department to see if there are any heat-relief shelters in your area.
     
  • Electric fans may provide comfort, but when the temperature is in the high 90s, fans will not prevent heat-related illness. Taking a cool shower or bath, or moving to an air-conditioned place is a much better way to cool off.
     
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.
     
  • NEVER leave anyone in a closed, parked vehicle.
     
  • Although any one at any time can suffer from heat-related illness, some people are at greater risk than others. Check regularly on:
     

    • Infants and young children
    • People aged 65 or older
    • People who have a mental illness
    • Those who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure
       
  • Visit adults at risk at least twice a day and closely watch them for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Infants and young children, of course, need much more frequent watching.

If you must be out in the heat:

  • Photo of woman relaxing in the shade.Limit your outdoor activity to morning and evening hours.
     
  • Cut down on exercise. If you must exercise, drink two to four glasses of cool, nonalcoholic fluids each hour.  A sports beverage can replace the salt and minerals you lose in sweat. Warning: If you are on a low-salt diet, talk with your doctor before drinking a sports beverage. Remember the warning in the first “tip” (above), too.
     
  • Try to rest often in shady areas.
     
  • Protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat (also keeps you cooler) and sunglasses and by putting on sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher (the most effective products say “broad spectrum” or “UVA/UVB protection” on their labels).

This information provided by NCEH’s Health Studies Branch.

(Source: http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/heattips.asp)