Tag Archives: Tempo

great compositions/performances: Glazunov “Symphony No 7″ USSR Ministry of Culture Symphony OrchestraGennadi Rozhdestvensky


Glazunov “Symphony No 7″ Gennadi Rozhdestvensky

make music part of your llife series: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet – Fantasy Overture


make music part of your life: Aram Khachaturian – Lezginka from Gayane


Aram Khachaturian – Lezginka from Gayane

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Khachaturian in 1971

signature written in ink in a flowing script

Aram Il’yich Khachaturian (/ˈærəm ˌkɑːəˈtʊəriən/;[1] Russian: Арам Ильич Хачатурян; Armenian: Արամ Խաչատրյան, Aram Xačatryan;[A] Armenian pronunciation: [ɑˈɾɑm χɑt͡ʃʰɑt(ə)ɾˈjɑn]; 6 June 1903 – 1 May 1978) was a Soviet Armenian composer and conductor. He is considered one of the leading Soviet composers.[2][3]

Born and raised in Tbilisi, the multicultural capital of Georgia, Khachaturian moved to Moscow in 1921 following the Sovietization of the Caucasus. Without prior music training, he enrolled in the Gnessin Musical Institute, subsequently studying at the Moscow Conservatory in the class of Nikolai Myaskovsky, among others. His first major work, the Piano Concerto (1936), popularized his name within and outside the Soviet Union. It was followed by the Violin Concerto (1940) and the Cello Concerto (1946). His other significant compositions include the Masquerade Suite (1941), the Anthem of the Armenian SSR (1944), three symphonies (1935, 1943, 1947), and around 25 film scores. Khachaturian is best known for his ballet music—Gayane (1942) and Spartacus (1954). His most popular piece, the “Sabre Dance” from Gayane, has been used extensively in popular culture and has been covered by a number of musicians worldwide.[4] His style is “characterized by colorful harmonies, captivating rhythms, virtuosity, improvisations, and sensuous melodies.”[5]

During most of his career, Khachaturian was approved by the Soviet government and held several high posts in the Union of Soviet Composers from the late 1930s, although he joined the Communist Party only in 1943. Along with Sergei Prokofiev and Dmitri Shostakovich, he was officially denounced as a “formalist” and his music dubbed “anti-people” in 1948, but was restored later that year. After 1950 he taught at the Gnessin Institute and the Moscow Conservatory, and turned to conducting. He traveled to Europe, Latin America and the United States with concerts of his own works. In 1957 Khachaturian became the Secretary of Union of Soviet Composers, a position he held until his death.

Khachaturian was the most renowned Armenian composer of the 20th century[6] and the author of the first Armenian ballet music, symphony, concerto, and film score.[B] While following the established musical traditions of Russia, he broadly used Armenian and to lesser extent, Caucasian, Eastern & Central European, and Middle Eastern peoples’ folk music in his works. He is highly regarded in Armenia, where he is considered a “national treasure”.[7]

Denunciation and restoration (1948)

 
Khachaturian in 1964

In mid-December 1947, the Department for Agitation and Propaganda (better known as Agitprop) submitted to Andrei Zhdanov, the secretary of the Communist Party’s Central Committee, a document on the “shortcomings” in the development of Soviet music. On 10–13 January 1948, a conference was held at the Kremlin in the presence of seventy musicians, composers, conductors and others who were confronted by Zhdanov:[35]

We will consider that if these comrades [Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Myaskovsky, Khachaturian, Kabalevsky and Shebalin] namely who are the principal and leading figures of the formalist direction in music. And that direction is fundamentally incorrect.

Thus, Khachaturian and other leading composers were denounced by the Communist Party as followers of the alleged formalism[10] (i.e. “[a type of] music that was considered too advanced or difficult for the masses to enjoy”)[3] and their music was dubbed “anti-people”.[36] It was the Symphonic Poem (1947), later titled the Third Symphony, that officially earned Khachaturian the wrath of the Party.[35][37] Ironically, he wrote the work as a tribute to the 30th anniversary of the October Revolution.[38] He stated: “I wanted to write the kind of composition in which the public would feel my unwritten program without an announcement. I wanted this work to express the Soviet people’s joy and pride in their great and mighty country.”[39]

Musicologist Blair Johnston believes that his “music contained few, if any, of the objectionable traits found in the music of some of his more adventuresome colleagues. In retrospect, it was most likely Khachaturian’s administrative role in the Union [of Soviet Composers], perceived by the government as a bastion of politically incorrect music, and not his music as such, which earned him a place on the black list of 1948.”[40] In March 1948,[20] Khachaturian “made a very full and humble apology for his artistic “errors” following the Zhdanov decree; his musical style, however, underwent no changes.”[40] He was sent to Armenia as a “punishment”,[10] and continued to be censured.[20] By December 1948,[20] he was “restored to favor later that year when he was praised for his film biography of Lenin”—Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (ru).[16]

Historic Musical Bits: Isaac Stern – Edouard Lalo – Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21


Édouard Lalo

Édouard Lalo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Isaac Stern – Edouard Lalo – Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21

Published on Oct 24, 2012

Eugene Ormandy conducting Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra
I. Allegro non troppo
II. Scherzando
III. Intermezzo
IV. Andante
V. Rondo

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The Symphonie espagnole in D minor, Op. 21, is a work for violin and orchestra by Édouard Lalo.

History

The work was written in 1874 for violinist Pablo de Sarasate, and premiered in Paris in February 1875.

Although called a “Spanish Symphony” (see also Sinfonia concertante), it is considered a violin concerto by musicians today. The piece has Spanish motifs throughout, and launched a period when Spanish-themed music came into vogue. (Georges Bizet‘s opera Carmen premiered a month after the Symphonie espagnole.)

The Symphonie espagnole is one of Lalo’s two most often played works, the other being his Cello Concerto. His “official” Violin Concerto in F, and his Symphony in G minor, written thirteen years later, are neither performed nor recorded as often.[citation needed]

Structure

  1. Allegro non troppo
  2. Scherzando: Allegro molto
  3. Intermezzo: Allegro non troppo
  4. Andante
  5. Rondo: Allegro

A typical performance runs just over one-half hour. One of the shorter recordings, conductor Eugene Ormandy’s 1967 recording with the Philadelphia Orchestra, featuring violinist Isaac Stern, runs 32 minutes and 43 seconds.[1]

Influence on Tchaikovsky

The Symphonie espagnole had some influence on the genesis of Tchaikovsky‘s Violin Concerto in D major. In March 1878, Tchaikovsky was staying at Nadezhda von Meck‘s estate at Clarens, Switzerland, while recovering from the breakdown of his disastrous marriage and his subsequent suicide attempt. His favourite pupil (and possibly his lover), the violinist Iosif Kotek, shortly arrived from Berlin with a lot of new music for violin. These included the Symphonie espagnole, which he and Tchaikovsky played through to great delight. This gave Tchaikovsky the idea of writing a violin concerto, and he immediately set aside his current work on a piano sonata and started on the concerto on 17 March.[2] With Kotek’s technical help, the concerto was finished by 11 April.

References

 

 

 

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 1 “Winter Daydreams” (Fedoseyev)


 

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 1 “Winter Daydreams” (Fedoseyev)

“Ruhe sanft, mein holdes Leben” Lucia Popp , Vienna Haydn Orchestra, István Kertész (1972 Decca Music Group Limited) , A Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus


Mozart: Zaide, K.344 / Act 1 – “Ruhe sanft, mein holdes

Leben”

Cziffra plays Liszt Hungarian Rhapsodies No.1-9


Cziffra plays Liszt Hungarian Rhapsodies No.1-9

 

best classical music , Gustav Holst St.Paul’s Suite for String Orchestra Op.29, No.2, great compositions/performances


 

Published on Oct 18, 2014

Cross Chamber Orchestra(CCO)
Conductor : Jin Daniel Suh

Alexander Glazunov: Symphony #7 “Pastoral” in F Op 77, great compositions/performances


The image of Russian conductor Gennady Rozhdes...

The image of Russian conductor Gennady Rozhdestvensky Das Foto von russisch Dirigent Gennadi Nikolajewitsch Roschdestwenski (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Alexandr Glazunov – Symphony No. 7 in F major, Op. 77

Happy Birthday Mozart Week: Piano Concerto No.8 ‘Lützow’ in C major, (KV 246) , great compositions


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto No.8 ‘Lützow’ in C major, (KV 246)

Antonín Dvořák – Bagatelles, Op. 47 , great compositions/performances


Antonín Dvořák – Bagatelles, Op. 47

Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Major D664. great compositions/performances


Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Major D664

Schubert: 6 Moments Musical Op.94 (D780) Wilhelm Backhaus (1884-1969) Piano, great compositions/performances


Schubert: 6 Moments Musical Op.94 (D780)

(listen to more classical music at euzicasa: here  here here and many more)

Alexander Glazunov Symphony No 5 in B flat major, Op 55, great compositions/performances


Alexander Glazunov Symphony No 5 in B flat major, Op 55

Carl Maria Von Weber: Clarinet Quintet in B flat, op. 34 , great compositions/performances


Weber: Clarinet Quintet in B flat, op. 34

Symphony No. 3 in D Major, Op. 29 “Polish” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, #Great compositions/performancers


Symphony No. 3 in D Major, Op. 29 “Polish” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Published on Feb 24, 2013

Symphony No. 3 in D Major, Op. 29 “Polish” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Composed in 1875

I. Introduzione e Allegro. Moderato assai (Tempo di marcia funebre) – Allegro brillante (0:00)
II. Alla tedesca. Allegro moderato e semplice – Trio (15:30)
III. Andante. Andante elegiaco (26:38)
IV. Scherzo. Allegro vivo – Trio (36:32)
V. Finale. Allegro con fuoco (Tempo di polacca) (42:42)

****Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
****Yuri Temirkanov, cond.
****Recorded in 1991
****http://www.amazon.com/6-Symphonies-P-…

****Image: Tchaikovsky (published 1906), courtesy Wikipedia

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The purpose of this video is to foster a love of music. No copyright infringement of this recording is intended, but if you hold the copyright and would like this video removed, please let me know, and I will do so.

Ludwig van Beethoven String Quartet No. 10 in E-flat Major (“Harp”), Op. 74, great compositions/performances


Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 26 in D major, K. 537, ‘Coronation’ (Murray Perahia): make music part of your life series


MozartPiano Concerto No. 26 in D major, K. 537, ‘Coronation’ (Murray Perahia)

Great musical recordings: Brahms – Wilhelm Kempff 1950’s legacy (op. 10, 24, 76,79,116,117,118,119): Great compositions/performances


Brahms – Wilhelm Kempff 1950’s legacy (op. 10, 24, 76,79,116,117,118,119)

CZIFFRA – LISZT Transcendental Etude No.9 in A flat major, “Ricordanza”: great compositions/perfofrmances


CZIFFRA – LISZT Transcendental Etude No.9 in A flat major, “Ricordanza”

Schubert – 4 Impromptus, D. 899 / Op. 90, Maria João Pires,: great compositions/performances


Schubert – 4 Impromptus, D. 899 / Op. 90 (Maria João Pires)

Sviatoslav Richter plays Rachmaninoff Concerto No.1, Op. 1: great compositions/performances


Sviatoslav Richter plays Rachmaninov Concerto No.1, Op.1

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 6 “Pathetique”, Op. 74 (Fedoseyev),: great compositions/performances


P. I. TchaikovskySymphony No. 6 “Pathetique”, Op. 74 (Fedoseyev)

Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 16 in D Major, K. 451 (Vladimir Ashkenazy),: great compositions/performances


Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 16 in D Major, K. 451 (Vladimir Ashkenazy)

Practicing for my Salle Pleyel recital…and a fashion lesson Valentina Lisitsa


Practicing for my Salle Pleyel recital…and a fashion lesson :) Valentina Lisitsa

Mozart: Piano concerto n. No. 21 in C major, K.467 Pollini-Muti: great compositions/performances


Mozart: Piano concerto n. No. 21 in C major, K.467 Pollini-Muti

W. A. Mozart – KV 385 – 1782 Version – Symphony No. 35 in D major “Haffner”: make music part of your life series


W. A. Mozart – KV 385 – 1782 Version – Symphony No. 35 in D major “Haffner”

Mozart – Symphony No. 39 in E flat, K. 543: make music part of your life series


Mozart – Symphony No. 39 in E flat, K. 543

Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini: Cello Concerto No.3 in D major, (G.476): make music part of your life series


Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini: Cello Concerto No.3 in D major, (G.476)

Grieg Holberg Suite Op. 40 グリーグ ホルベルク組曲 : great compositions/performances


Grieg Holberg Suite Op. 40 グリーグ ホルベルク組曲

Mendelssohn — Violin Concerto in e minor op 64: GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, KV 467 “Elvira Madigan”: great compositions/performances


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, KV 467 “Elvira Madigan

Dvorak – Symphony No.3 & 4, Op.10 & 13|great compositions/performances


DvorakSymphony No.3 & 4,

Op.10 & 13

Antonín Dvořák – String Quartet in E flat major, Op. 51 ‘Slawisches’ |great compositions/performances


Antonín DvořákString Quartet in E flat major, Op. 51 ‘Slawisches’

Gioachino Rossini – Sonata No. 3 for Strings in C major: make music part of your life series


Gioachino Rossini – Sonata No. 3 for Strings in C major

Mozart Flute Concerto No 1 in G – Jean-Pierre Rampal, Sydney Symphony Orchestra: make music part of your life series


Mozart Flute Concerto No 1 in G – Jean-Pierre Rampal, Sydney Symphony Orchestra

Luigi Boccherini – String Quintet in E maj Opus 11 No 5 G275, make music part of your life series


Luigi BoccheriniString Quintet in E maj Opus 11 No 5 G275

Isaac Stern – Beethoven, Thriple Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra Op.56: great compositions/performances


Isaac Stern – Beethoven, Thriple Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra Op.56

Beethoven | Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major, Op. 26 | Daniel Barenboim: great compositions/performances


Beethoven | Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major, Op. 26 | Daniel Barenboim

Español: Sonata para Piano nº12 en La bemol Mayor, Op. 26

* 1st Movement (Andante con Variazioni)
* 2nd Movement (Scherzo, Allegro Molto)
* 3rd Movement (Marcia funebre sulla morte d’un Eroe)
* 4th Movement (Allegro)

Work: Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major, Op. 26
Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
Soloist: Daniel Barenhoim

Beethoven – Piano Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110, Daniel Barenboim, great compositions/performances


Piano Sonata No. 31 – Beethoven

Antonín Dvořák – Suite in A Major “American”, Op. 98b, B 190: make music part ofyour life series


Tchaikovsky String Quartet Op. 11 – II. Andante cantabile (Kontras Quartet): great compositions/performances


Pyotr Tchaikovsky – String Quartet No 1 in D Major, op.11: great compositions/performances


Pyotr Tchaikovsky – String Quartet No 1 in D Major, op.11

Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony no. 8 in F Major, Op 93: great compositions/performances


Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony no.8 in F Major,  Op 93

Preston-Friedman-Kreger Trio Plays Beethoven Trio in B-flat Major, WoO 39: great compositions/performances


Preston-Friedman-Kreger Trio Plays Beethoven Trio in B-flat Major, WoO 39

Mendelssohn-Piano Concerto No. 1 in g minor Op. 25, Rudolf Serkin/Philadelphia Orchestra- Eugene Ormandy: great compositions/perfornmances


Mendelssohn-Piano Concerto No. 1 in g minor Op. 25

Beethoven: Sonata cello & piano op. 102 nº 2. Rostropovich – Richter: great compositions/performances


Beethoven: Sonata cello & piano op. 102 nº 2. Rostropovich – Richter

Wieniawski-Violin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22: great compositions/performances


WieniawskiViolin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22

Antonín Dvořák – Romantische Stücke, Op. 75: make music part ofyour life series


Antonín Dvořák – Romantische Stücke, Op. 75

Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 15 in D major, op. 28, “Pastoral”- Daniel Barenboim: great compositions/performances


Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 15 in D major, op. 28, “Pastoral”. Daniel Barenboim, piano