Tag Archives: Theatre

Kabuki


Kabuki

Kabuki, a popular form of Japanese drama, is known for its spectacular staging, elaborate costumes, and striking makeup in place of masks. It originated in 1603, when a woman named Izumo no Okuni began performing a new style of dance that became instantly popular. Rival troupes quickly formed, and kabuki evolved into an ensemble dance performed by women—a form much different from its modern incarnation in which men play all the roles. Why were women banned from the kabuki stage in 1629? More… Discuss

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this day in the yesteryear: Globe Theatre Burns to the Ground (1613)


Globe Theatre Burns to the Ground (1613)

 

English: The Globe Theatre. The Globe Theatre,...

English: The Globe Theatre. The Globe Theatre, Southwark. This is a reconstruction of the Globe Theatre, made famous by Shakespeare. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The first Globe Theatre was an Elizabethan theatre where several of Shakespeare’s plays were originally staged. It was built around 1598 in London using timber from an earlier theater and was jointly owned by members of the theatrical company to which Shakespeare belonged. The Globe burned down in 1613 during a performance of Henry VIII. It was rebuilt in 1614, but Puritans closed it and all other theaters in 1642, and it was demolished soon after. What caused the fire in 1613? More… Discuss

ARTICLE: THE LITTLE THEATER MOVEMENT


The Little Theater Movement

Sensational melodramas had been en vogue at the theater since the 19th century, but as film became the medium for large-scale spectacle, the Little Theater Movement developed in the US. Beginning in Chicago around 1912, theater enthusiasts banded together to produce more intimate, noncommercial, and reform-minded plays. The success of their Little Theater Movement likely helped to launch community theater and Off-Broadway plays. It also kick-started the career of what famous playwright? More… Discuss

 

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