Tag Archives: theodore roosevelt

today’s birthday: Geronimo (1829)


Geronimo (1829)

When US authorities abolished the Chiricahua Reservation in 1876 and removed the Apaches to an arid region of New Mexico, Geronimo led a group of followers to Mexico. He was soon captured and returned to the new reservation, but escaped again with a group in 1881 and began leading them on raids. The cycle repeated again and again, until late in 1886, when Geronimo and the remainder of his forces surrendered for good. How is it that he ended up riding in Theodore Roosevelt’s inaugural procession? More… Discuss

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Saint of the Day for Saturday, June 6th, 2015: St. Norbert


Teddy Bears


Teddy Bears

The teddy bear is a traditional stuffed toy bear for children. One legend has it that the name originates from an incident involving Theodore Roosevelt, whose attendants found and caught an old injured bear during a hunting trip. “Teddy” refused to kill the animal, however, calling it “unsportsmanlike.” “Teddy’s Bear” was immediately publicized by political cartoonists, and its stuffed animal form began selling in stores shortly thereafter. Where is the world’s first teddy bear museum located? More… Discuss

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
March 23

1657   France and England form an alliance against Spain.
1743   Handel’s Messiah is performed for the first time in London.
1775   American revolutionary hero Patrick Henry, while addressing the House of Burgesses, declares “give me liberty, or give me death!”
1791   Etta Palm, a Dutch champion of woman’s rights, sets up a group of women’s clubs called the Confederation of the Friends of Truth.
1848   Hungary proclaims its independence of Austria.
1857   Elisha Otis installs the first modern passenger elevator in a public building, at the corner of Broome Street and Broadway in New York City.
1858   Eleazer A. Gardner of Philadelphia patents the cable street car, which runs on overhead cables.
1862   Confederate General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson faces his only defeat at the Battle of Kernstown, Va
1880   John Stevens of Neenah, Wis., patents the grain crushing mill. This mill allows flour production to increase by 70 percent.
1901   A group of U.S. Army soldier led by Brig. Gen. Frederick Funston capture Emilio Aguinaldo, the leader of the Philippine Insurrection of 1899.
1903   The Wright brothers obtain an airplane patent.
1909   British Lt. Ernest Shackleton finds the magnetic South Pole.
1909   Theodore Roosevelt begins an African safari sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution and National Geographic Society.
1917   Austrian Emperor Charles I makes a peace proposal to French President Poincare.
1920   Great Britain denounces the United States because of its delay in joining the League of Nations.
1921   Arthur G. Hamilton sets a new parachute record, safely jumping 24,400 feet.
1927   Captain Hawthorne Gray sets a new balloon record soaring to 28,510 feet.
1933   The Reichstag gives Adolf Hitler the power to rule by decree.
1942   The Japanese occupy the Anadaman Islands in the Indian Ocean.
1951   U.S. paratroopers descend from flying boxcars in a surprise attack in Korea.
1956   Pakistan becomes the first Islamic republic, although it is still within the British Commonwealth.
1967   Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. calls the Vietnam War the biggest obstacle to the civil rights movement.
1970   Mafia boss Carlo Gambino is arrested for plotting to steal $3 million.
1972   The United States calls a halt to the peace talks on Vietnam being held in Paris.
1981   U.S. Supreme Court upholds a law making statutory rape a crime for men but not women.
Born on March 23
1900   Erich Fromm, German psychologist (The Sane Society).
1907   Daniele Bovet, Swiss-born Italian pharmacologist.
1908   Joan Crawford, American actress.
1910   Akira Kurosawa, film director (Rashomon, The Seven Samurai).
1912   Werner von Braun, German-born rocket pioneer.
1929   Sir Roger Bannister, the first man to run the mile in less than four minutes.

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Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
March 17

1766   Britain repeals the Stamp Act.
1776   British forces evacuate from Boston to Nova Scotia.
1799   Napoleon Bonaparte and his army reach Mediterranean seaport of St. Jean d’Acra, only to find British warships ready to break his siege of the town.
1868   The first postage stamp canceling machine patent is issued.
1884   John Joseph Montgomery makes the first glider flight in Otay, Calif.
1886   Twenty African Americans are killed in the Carrollton Massacre in Mississippi.
1891   The British steamer Utopia sinks off the coast of Gibraltar.
1905   Anna Eleanor Roosevelt, niece of President Theodore Roosevelt, marries Franklin D. Roosevelt in New York.
1910   The Camp Fire Girls are founded in Lake Sebago, Maine.
1914   Russia increases the number of active duty military from 460,000 to 1,700,000.
1924   Four Douglas army aircraft leave Los Angeles for an around the world flight.
1930   Mob boss Al Capone is released from jail.
1942   The Nazis begin deporting Jews to the Belsen camp.
1944   The U.S. Eighth Air Force bombs Vienna.
1959   The Dalai Lama flees Tibet and goes to India.
1961   The United States increases military aid and technicians to Laos.
1962   The Soviet Union asks the United States to pull out of South Vietnam.
1966   A U.S. submarine locates a missing H-bomb in the Mediterranean.
1970   The Army charges 14 officers with suppression of facts in the My Lai massacre case.
1972   Nixon asks Congress to halt busing in order to achieve desegregation.
1973   Twenty are killed in Cambodia when a bomb goes off that was meant for the Cambodian President Lon Nol.
1973   First POWs are released from the “Hanoi Hilton” in Hanoi, North Vietnam.
1985   President Ronald Reagan agrees to a joint study with Canada on acid rain.
1992   White South Africans approve constitutional reforms giving legal equality to blacks.
Born on March 17
1828   Patrick R. Cleburne, Confederate general.
1832   Daniel Conway Moncure, U.S. clergyman, author, abolitionist
1846   Kate Greenway, painter and illustrator (Mother Goose).
1902   Bobby Jones, American golfer.
1919   Nat “King” Cole, American jazz pianist and singer.

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Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

March 4

1152   Frederick Barbarossa is chosen as emperor and unites the two factions, which emerged in Germany after the death of Henry V.
1461   Henry VI is deposed and the Duke of York is proclaimed King Edward IV.
1634   Samuel Cole opens the first tavern in Boston, Massachusetts.
1766   The British Parliament repeals the Stamp Act, the cause of bitter and violent opposition in the colonies
1789   The first Congress of the United States meets in New York and declares that the Constitution is in effect.
1791   Vermont is admitted as the 14th state. It is the first addition to the original 13 colonies.
1793   George Washington is inaugurated as President for the second time.
1797   Vice-President John Adams, elected President on December 7, to replace George Washington, is sworn in.
1801   Thomas Jefferson becomes the first President to be inaugurated in Washington, D.C.
1813   The Russians fighting against Napoleon reach Berlin. The French garrison evacuates the city without a fight.
1861   The Confederate States of America adopt the “Stars and Bars” flag.
1877   The Russian Imperial Ballet stages the first performance of “Swan Lake” in Moscow.
1901   William McKinley is inaugurated president for the second time. Theodore Roosevelt is inaugurated as vice president.
1904   Russian troops begin to retreat toward the Manchurian border as 100,000 Japanese advance in Korea.
1908   The New York board of education bans the act of whipping students in school.
1912   The French council of war unanimously votes a mandatory three-year military service.
1914   Doctor Fillatre of Paris, France successfully separates Siamese twins.
1921   Warren G. Harding is sworn in as America’s 29th President.
1933   Franklin D. Roosevelt is inaugurated to his first term as president in Washington, D.C.
1944   Berlin is bombed by the American forces for the first time.
1952   North Korea accuses the United nations of using germ warfare.
1963   Six people get the death sentence in Paris plotting to kill President Charles de Gaulle.
1970   Fifty-seven people are killed as the French submarine Eurydice sinks in the Mediterranean Sea.
1975   Queen Elizabeth knights Charlie Chaplin.
1987   President Reagan takes full responsibility for the Iran-Contra affair in a national address.
Born on March 4
1394   Prince Henry the Navigator, sponsor of Portuguese voyages of discovery
1678   Antonio Vivaldi, Italian composer and violinist.
1747   Casimir Pulaski, American Revolutionary War general.
1852   Lady (Isabella Augusta) Gregory, Irish playwright, helped found the Abbey Theatre.
1888   Knute Rockne, football player and coach for Notre Dame.
1901   Charles Goren, world expert on the game of bridge.
1904   Ding Ling, Chinese writer and women’s rights activist.
1928   Alan Sillitoe, novelist (Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner).
1932   Miriam Makeba, South African singer.
1934   Jane Goodall, British anthropologist, known for her work with African chimpanzees.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.6XI5as8V.dpuf

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

March 4

1152   Frederick Barbarossa is chosen as emperor and unites the two factions, which emerged in Germany after the death of Henry V.
1461   Henry VI is deposed and the Duke of York is proclaimed King Edward IV.
1634   Samuel Cole opens the first tavern in Boston, Massachusetts.
1766   The British Parliament repeals the Stamp Act, the cause of bitter and violent opposition in the colonies
1789   The first Congress of the United States meets in New York and declares that the Constitution is in effect.
1791   Vermont is admitted as the 14th state. It is the first addition to the original 13 colonies.
1793   George Washington is inaugurated as President for the second time.
1797   Vice-President John Adams, elected President on December 7, to replace George Washington, is sworn in.
1801   Thomas Jefferson becomes the first President to be inaugurated in Washington, D.C.
1813   The Russians fighting against Napoleon reach Berlin. The French garrison evacuates the city without a fight.
1861   The Confederate States of America adopt the “Stars and Bars” flag.
1877   The Russian Imperial Ballet stages the first performance of “Swan Lake” in Moscow.
1901   William McKinley is inaugurated president for the second time. Theodore Roosevelt is inaugurated as vice president.
1904   Russian troops begin to retreat toward the Manchurian border as 100,000 Japanese advance in Korea.
1908   The New York board of education bans the act of whipping students in school.
1912   The French council of war unanimously votes a mandatory three-year military service.
1914   Doctor Fillatre of Paris, France successfully separates Siamese twins.
1921   Warren G. Harding is sworn in as America’s 29th President.
1933   Franklin D. Roosevelt is inaugurated to his first term as president in Washington, D.C.
1944   Berlin is bombed by the American forces for the first time.
1952   North Korea accuses the United nations of using germ warfare.
1963   Six people get the death sentence in Paris plotting to kill President Charles de Gaulle.
1970   Fifty-seven people are killed as the French submarine Eurydice sinks in the Mediterranean Sea.
1975   Queen Elizabeth knights Charlie Chaplin.
1987   President Reagan takes full responsibility for the Iran-Contra affair in a national address.
Born on March 4
1394   Prince Henry the Navigator, sponsor of Portuguese voyages of discovery
1678   Antonio Vivaldi, Italian composer and violinist.
1747   Casimir Pulaski, American Revolutionary War general.
1852   Lady (Isabella Augusta) Gregory, Irish playwright, helped found the Abbey Theatre.
1888   Knute Rockne, football player and coach for Notre Dame.
1901   Charles Goren, world expert on the game of bridge.
1904   Ding Ling, Chinese writer and women’s rights activist.
1928   Alan Sillitoe, novelist (Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner).
1932   Miriam Makeba, South African singer.
1934   Jane Goodall, British anthropologist, known for her work with African chimpanzees.

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today’s image: Alice Lee Roosevelt


Alice Lee Roosevelt

Alice Lee Roosevelt, President Theodore Roosevelt’s irrepressible eldest daughter, married Congressman Nicholas Longworth of Ohio in an elaborate White House ceremony on February 17, 1906. Heedless of social convention, Alice’s behavior routinely shocked her family and friends. Once the president, when confronted with another of Alice’s escapades, remarked, ‘I can do one of two things, I can run the country or control Alice. I cannot do both.’ Nevertheless, the world public was captivated with the first daughter, who seemed to embody the ideal Gay Nineties woman. In spite of its promising beginning, Alice’s 25-year marriage to Longworth was not a happy one, but Alice reigned as the grande dame of Washington, D.C. society for another 50 years. This photo was taken on March 24, 1902.

Photo: Library of Congress

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picture of the day: The Disputed Presidential Election of 1876



The Disputed Presidential Election of 1876

In 1876, Democrat Samuel Tilden ran for president against Republican Rutherford B. Hayes. On election night, it was clear that Tilden had won the popular vote, but it was also clear that votes in Florida, Louisiana, South Carolina and Oregon were fraudulent because of voter intimidation. Republicans knew that if the electoral votes from these four states were thrown out, Hayes would win. The country hovered near civil war as both Democrats and Republicans claimed victory. Illustrator Thomas Nast drew this cartoon, Tilden or Blood, showing the Democrats threatening violence. On January 29, 1877, a highly partisan Electoral Commission, made up of eight Republicans and seven Democrats, was established by Congress to settle the issue. Under the terms of the Tilden-Hayes Election Compromise, Hayes became president and the Republicans agreed to remove the last Federal troops from Southern territory, ending Reconstruction.

Image: Harper’s Weekly

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today’s picture: John Muir (Library of Congress)



John Muir

Naturalist and forest conservation advocate John Muir was largely responsible for the establishment of national parks such as Sequoia and Yosemite. After graduating from the University of Wisconsin, Scottish immigrant Muir worked on mechanical inventions, but when an industrial accident blinded him in one eye, he abandoned that career and devoted himself to nature. As early as 1876, Muir encouraged the federal government to establish a forest conservation program. The Sequoia and Yosemite parks were created in 1890 and two eloquent articles by Muir swayed public opinion in favor of federally protected national forests. Muir also influenced the conservation policy of President Theodore Roosevelt, who is shown here with Muir during a 1903 camping trip to Yosemite.

Library of Congress

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this day in the yesteryear: Devils Tower Named First US National Monument (1906)


Devils Tower Named First US National Monument (1906)

Rising 1,267 feet (386 m) above the meandering Belle Fourche River, Devils Tower is a cluster of rock columns in the Black Hills of Wyoming formed by the cooling and crystallization of molten matter. The site, which many Native American Plains tribes consider sacred, was declared the first US National Monument by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1906. A popular rock-climbing site, the monument attracts some 400,000 visitors each year. Why do most climbers abstain from scaling the tower in June? More… Discuss

Today In History: What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this

day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

September 14
1146   Zangi of the Near East is murdered. The Sultan Nur ad-Din, his son, pursues the conquest of Edessa.
1321   Dante Alighieri dies of malaria just hours after finishing writing Paradiso.
1544   Henry VIII’s forces take Boulogne, France.
1773   Russian forces under Aleksandr Suvorov successfully storm a Turkish fort at Hirsov, Turkey.
1791   Louis XVI swears his allegiance to the French constitution.
1812   Napoleon Bonaparte’s invasion of Russia reaches its climax as his Grande Armee enters Moscow–only to find the enemy capital deserted and burning, set afire by the few Russians who remained.
1814   Francis Scott Key writes the words to the “Star Spangled Banner” as he waits aboard a British launch in the Chesapeake Bay for the outcome of the British assault on Fort McHenry during the War of 1812.
1847   U.S. forces under Gen. Winfield Scott capture Mexico City, virtually bringing the two-year Mexican War to a close.
1853   The Allies land at Eupatoria on the west coast of Crimea.
1862   At the battles of South Mountain and Crampton’s Gap, Maryland Union troops smash into the Confederates as they close in on what will become the Antietam battleground.
1901   Vice President Theodore Roosevelt is sworn in as the 26th President of the United States upon the death of William McKinley, who was shot eight days earlier.
1911   Russian Premier Piotr Stolypin is mortally wounded in an assassination attempt at the Kiev opera house.
1943   German troops abandon the Salerno front in Italy..
1960   Iraq, Iran, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia form OPEC.
1966   Operation Attleboro, designed as a training exercise for American troops, becomes a month-long struggle against the Viet Cong.
1975   Mother Elizabeth Ann Seton becomes the first native-born American saint in the Roman Catholic Church.
1979   Nur Muhammad Taraki, president and former prime minister of Afghanistan, is assassinated in a coup in which prime minister Hafizullah Amin seizes power.
1982   Bachir Gemayel, president-elect of Lebanon, is killed along with 26 others in a bomb blast in Beirut.
1984   Joe Kittinger, a former USAF fighter pilot during the Vietnam War, becomes the first person to pilot a gas balloon solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
1994   Major League Baseball players strike over a salary cap and other proposed changes, forcing the cancellation of the entire postseason and the World Series.
2007   Northern Rock Bank suffers the UK’s first bank run in 150 years.
Born on September 14
1769   Baron Freidrich von Humbolt, German naturalist and explorer who made the first isothermic and isobaric maps.
1849   Ivan Pavlov, Russian physiologist who studied dogs’ responsiveness.
1860   Hamlin Garland, author who wrote about the Midwest in novles such as A Son of the Middle Border and The Book of the American Indian.
1864   Lord Robert Cecil, one of the founders of the League of Nations and its president from 1923 to 1945.
1867   Charles Dana Gibson, illustrator, creator of the ‘Gibson Girl.’
1879   Margaret Sanger, birth-control advocate and founder of Planned Parenthood.
1898   Hal B. Wallis, film producer (The Maltese Falcon, Casablanca).
1921   Constance Baker Motley, first African-American woman to be appointed a federal judge.
1930   Allan Bloom, writer (The Closing of the American Mind).
1934   Kate Millet, feminist writer, author of Sexual Politics.
1936   Ferid Murad, Albanian-American physician and pharmacologist, is co-winner of Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his research on nitroglycerin’s effects the cardiovascular system.
1948   Marc Reisner, author and environmentalist best known for his book Cadillac Desert, a history of water management in the Western portion of the US.
1955   Geraldine Brooks, Australian-American journalist and author; her novel March won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (2005).
1961   Wendy Thomas (Melinda “Wendy” Thomas Morse), namesake, mascot and spokesperson for the Wendy’s chain of fast-food restaurants.
1983   Amy Winehouse, singer-songwriter; her five Grammy wins (out of six nominations) for her Back to Black album (2006) tied the existing record for most wins by a female artist in a single night; won Brit Award for Best British Female Artist (2007).

 

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: GRAND CANYON DESIGNATED A NATIONAL MONUMENT (1908)


Grand Canyon Designated a National Monument (1908)

Arizona’s Grand Canyon, the great gorge of the Colorado River, is one of the natural wonders of the world. The canyon reaches depths greater than 1 mile (1.6 km), and its multicolored rock layers and steep rims are renowned for their beauty. After visiting the Grand Canyon in 1903, US President Theodore Roosevelt—an avid conservationist—became a major proponent of its preservation and designated it a US National Monument on January 11, 1908. Who fought against his efforts? More… Discuss

 

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William Howard Taft (1857)

An extremely large, easygoing man, Taft was said to have not really wanted to be US president. In 1908, he was elected anyway, having already served as solicitor general, appellate judge, secretary of war, and governor of the Philippines. His split with former president Theodore Roosevelt, who consequently ran for office again, cost them both the 1912 election. Taft later served as chief justice of the Supreme Court. He was the last president to have what physical characteristic? More… Discuss