Tag Archives: Thomas Aquinas

Saint of the Day for Tuesday, February 10th, 2015 : St. Scholastica


Image of St. Scholastica

St. Scholastica

St. Scholastica, sister of St. Benedict, consecrated her life to God from her earliest youth. After her brother went to Monte Cassino, where he established his famous monastery, she took up her abode … continue reading

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Saint of the Day for Tuesday, February 10th, 2015: St. Scholastica


Image of St. Scholastica

St. Scholastica

St. Scholastica, sister of St. Benedict, consecrated her life to God from her earliest youth. After her brother went to Monte Cassino, where he established his famous monastery, she took up her abode … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

Saint of the Day for Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015: St. Blaise


Saint of the Day for Wednesday, January 28th, 2015 : St. Thomas Aquinas


quotation: The paradox of courage is that a man must be a little careless of his life even in order to keep it. Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936)


The paradox of courage is that a man must be a little careless of his life even in order to keep it.

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936) Discuss

quotation: Gilbert Chesterton


I owe my success to having listened respectfully to the very best advice, and then going away and doing the exact opposite.

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936)

QUOTATION: Aristotle


All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsion, habit, reason, passion, and desire.

Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC) Discuss

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ARTICLE: SUMMA THEOLOGICA


Summa Theologica

Summa Theologica was the first Christian attempt at a comprehensive theological system. Written by Thomas Aquinas—a 13th-century philosopher and a principal saint of the Catholic Church—it is a compendium of all the main teachings of the Church for the “instruction of beginners.” It addresses a range of topics including God, the creation of the world, morality, and the life of Christ. Though incomplete,Summa Theologica is Aquinas’s most important work. About how many pages is it? More… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: OBSCURANTISM (If I may: there is nothing but OBSCURANTISM in NEW WORLD ORDER! Stop looking back to the inquisition!)


Obscurantism

From the Latin word for darkening—obscurans—comes obscurantism, referring to the practice of deliberately withholding information. This may be done either by concealing facts or—in literature and art—by using an intentionally vague style. The term derives from a 16th-century satire about the dispute between Jew-turned-Dominican friar Johannes Pfefferkorn, who sought to destroy all Jewish texts, and his humanist opponent Johann Reuchlin. Who gave Pfefferkorn permission to burn the works? More…Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: THE EIGHT EVIL THOUGHTS


The Eight Evil Thoughts

Evagrius Ponticus struggled with adulterous desires and physical illness before devoting his life to Christianity, becoming an ascetic monk in 383 CE. Despite later accusations of heresy, Evagrius exerted a tremendous influence on the church through his writings and is best known for categorizing eight forms of temptation. These eight evil thoughts are gluttony, greed, sloth, sorrow, lust, anger, vainglory, and pride. Who later revised the list to form the more commonly known Seven Deadly Sins?More… Discuss

 

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Quotation: Gilbert Chesterton


The most incredible thing about miracles is that they happen.

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936) Discuss

 

Albertus Magnus


Albertus Magnus

Magnus was a 13th-century Dominican bishop regarded as one of the greatest German philosophers and theologians of the Middle Ages. He taught Thomas Aquinas, was a major Aristotelian scholar and commentator, and wrote prolifically on myriad subjects. Extraordinarily well-read, he possessed an encyclopedic knowledge of a vast array of scientific and philosophical disciplines. Various legends portray him as a magician or alchemist. His refusal to ride horses earned him what affectionate nickname? More… Discuss

César Franck: Panis Angelicus with Soprano Danee Robinson


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Panis angelicus is the penultimate strophe of the hymn Sacris solemniis written by Saint Thomas Aquinas for the Feast of Corpus Christi as part of a complete liturgy of the Feast including prayers for the Mass and the Liturgy of the Hours.

The strophe of Sacris solemniis that begins with the words “Panis angelicus” (bread of angels) has often been set to music separately from the rest of the hymn. Most famously, in 1872 César Franck set this strophe for voice (tenor), harp, cello, and organ, and incorporated it into his Messe à trois voix Opus 12. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panis_Angelicus)

I hope you too will enjoy Danee Robinson’s interpretation  of the sublime  hymn  ” Panis Angelicus.”  
 
Find out more about Danee’s,  recordings, musical career and  coming
recitals at her website:  http://daneerobinson.com/

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