Tag Archives: Tokyo

today’s holiday: Aoi Matsuri


Aoi Matsuri

One of the three major festivals of Kyoto, Japan, the Aoi Matsuri, or Hollyhock Festival, is believed to date from the sixth century. The festival’s name derives from the hollyhock leaves adorning the headdresses of the participants; legend says hollyhocks help prevent storms and earthquakes. Today, the festival, which was revived in 1884, consists of a re-creation of the original imperial procession. Some 500 people in ancient costume parade with horses and large lacquered oxcarts carrying the “imperial messengers” from the Kyoto Imperial Palace to the shrines. More… Discuss

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Today’s Birthday: Chiune Sugihara (1900)


Today’s Birthday

Chiune Sugihara (1900)

A Japanese diplomat, Sugihara was sent to Kaunas, Lithuania, in the early days of World War II. There, in direct violation of his orders from Tokyo, the consul began issuing transit visas for fleeing Jews. Without such visas, the refugees would not have been permitted to leave the country. In little over a month, he wrote thousands of visas, continuing even as the train removing him from his consulate post pulled out of the station. How did the Japanese government react to his insubordination? More… Discuss

People and Places: Tsukiji Fish Market


Tsukiji Fish Market

The Tokyo Metropolitan Central Wholesale Market, or Tsukiji fish market, is the biggest wholesale fish and seafood market in the world. Located in Tokyo, Japan, the market offers more than 400 types of seafood and is a major attraction for foreign visitors. It typically opens at 3 AM, with auctions beginning around 5 AM. Bidding can only be done by licensed participants, but visitors can watch. What were the “Rice Riots,” and how did they lead to the creation of the Tsukiji fish market? More… Discuss

SVIATOSLAV RICHTER La Cathedrale Engloutie CLAUDE DEBUSSY: great compositions/performances


SVIATOSLAV RICHTER La Cathedrale Engloutie CLAUDE DEBUSSY

this day in the yesteryear: Japan’s Meiji Constitution Goes into Effect (1890)


Japan’s Meiji Constitution Goes into Effect (1890)

In the mid-19th century, Japan was forced to end its isolation by signing a series of unequal treaties that gave Western nations special privileges in Japan. The unpopular Tokugawa shogunate collapsed soon after and, in 1868, the boy emperor Meiji was “restored” to power. The Meiji constitution defined Japan as a capable, modern nation deserving of Western respect while preserving its own power. What did Ito Hirobumi, who drafted the Meiji constitution, do to prepare himself for the task? More… Discuss

Ryuichi Sakamoto – bibo no aozora: make music part of your life series


Ryuichi Sakamoto – bibo no aozora

today’s holiday: Bettara-Ichi Festival


Bettara-Ichi

 


The annual Pickle Market, or Sticky-Sticky Fair, is held near the Ebisu Shrine in Tokyo, Japan, to supply people with what they will need to observe the Ebisu Festival on the following day, October 20. People buy wooden images of Ebisu, good-luck tokens, and most importantly, the white, pickled radish known as bettara that is so closely identified with the fair. The Sticky-Sticky Fair was named after the way the pickled radishes were sold. Stall keepers used to dangle them from a rope so the buyer wouldn’t get his hands sticky from the malted rice in which the radishes had been pickled. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: First Photos Taken of a Giant Squid in the Wild (2004)


First Photos Taken of a Giant Squid in the Wild (2004)

In 2004, two teams of Japanese researchers traveled to a sperm whale hunting ground south of Tokyo, where they attached bait, a camera, and a flash to a 3,000-foot (914-m) line. After numerous attempts to lure their prey, a 26-foot (8-m) giant squid attacked and became entangled in the lure, breaking free after more than 500 photos were taken over a four-hour period. What did the photos—the first ever taken of a live giant squid in its natural habitat—reveal about the mysterious creature? More… Discuss

Amaizing pics: Aogashima Volcano, Japan pic.twitter.com/TsCqKumy1a — Earth Pics (@earthposts)


today’s birhtday: Eiji Yoshikawa (1892)


Eiji Yoshikawa (1892)

Yoshikawa was a popular Japanese historical novelist. Despite the fact that many of his novels are actually revisions of past works, Yoshikawa was awarded the Order of Cultural Merit in 1960. Just before his death from cancer two years later, he received the Mainichi Art Award as well. His success is especially impressive given his lack of formal education—he had not been able to study beyond primary school due to his family’s financial troubles. What are some of Yoshikawa’s novels? More… Discuss

make music part of your life series: Philippe Gaubert : Divertissement Grec pour Deux Flûtes avec Accompagnement de Piano


[youtube.com/watch?v=hxoOzO9WrJY]

Philippe Gaubert : Divertissement Grec pour Deux Flûtes avec Accompagnement de Piano

Philippe Gaubert(1879-1941) : Divertissement Grec pour Deux Flûtes avec Accompagnement de Piano. / Keiji Katsumata, Fl.1st ; Tetsuo Kugai, Fl.2nd ; Mariko Kaneda, Piano
“Concert Salon de musique des raisins secs”
12 Aug. 2011, The Luteran Ichigaya Center, Tokyo
「第4回レーズン派の音楽館演奏会」~フィリップ・ゴーベール : 2本のフルートとピアノの為のギリシャ風嬉遊曲 /
勝俣敬二(fl)、陸井鉄男(fl)、金田真理子(Pf)
2011年8月12日、ルーテル市ヶ谷センター(東京)

Philippe Gaubert

Cover of Philippe Gaubert

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Philippe Gaubert (5 July 1879 – 8 July 1941) was a French musician who was a distinguished performer on the flute, a respected conductor, and a composer, primarily for the flute.

Gaubert was born in Cahors in Southwest France. He became one of the most prominent French musicians between the two World Wars. After a prominent career as a flautist with the Paris Opéra, he was appointed in 1919, at the age of forty, to three positions that placed him at the very center of French musical life:

In 1907 he participated in the first performance of Maurice Ravel‘s Introduction and Allegro for harp, flute, clarinet and string quartet. Among his recordings as conductor, one that he made of Franck‘s Symphony in D Minor (with the Conservatoire forces) is particularly notable.

Gaubert’s compositions are by no means especially innovative, but his work benefited from the examples of Franck, Ravel, and Debussy. Naïla, his opera in three acts, premiered at the Paris Opéra on 7 April 1927. Three of his ballets had their first performances at that venue, as well.

During 1941, Gaubert died of a stroke while in the French capital. His friend, the journalist Jean Bouzerand, convinced the town of Cahors to create a public garden named in his honor near the river Lot in the late 1930s. When Gaubert was still alive, Albert Roussel dedicated the movement ‘Monsieur de la Péjaudie’ in his piece ‘Joueurs de Flûte‘ to him.

Selected works

Chamber music
  • 3 Aquarelles, for flute, cello and piano
  • Ballade, for flute and piano
  • Ballade for viola and piano (1938)
  • Berceuse, for flute and piano
  • Cantabile et Scherzetto, for cornet and piano (1909)
  • Divertissement Grec, for 2 flutes and harp
  • 2 Esquisses, for flute and piano
  • Fantaisie for clarinet & piano
  • Fantaisie, for flute and piano
  • Gavotte en rondeau (after Lully’s Les ballets du roi), for flute and piano
  • Madrigal, for flute and piano
  • Morceau Symphonique, for trombone and piano
  • Médailles antiques, for flute, violin and piano
  • Nocturne et Allegro Scherzando, for flute and piano
  • Pièce Romantique, for flute, cello, and piano
  • Romance, for flute and piano (1905)
  • Romance, for flute and piano (1908)
  • Siciliene, for flute and piano
  • Sonata for Flute and Piano, No.1
  • Sonata for Flute and Piano, No.2
  • Sonata for Flute and Piano, No.3
  • Sonatine, for flute and piano
  • Suite, for flute and piano
  • Sur l’eau, for flute and piano
  • Tarantelle, for flute, oboe and piano
  • Nocturne et Allegro Scherzando for flute & piano
Vocal
  • Soir paien, for voice, flute and piano
  • Vocalise in form of Barcarolle, for voice and piano
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NEWS: PREPARE THE PADDLES: HUMAN ACTIVITIES CAUSING CITIES TO SINK


Prepare the Paddles: Human Activities Causing Cities to Sink

Human activities are speeding the sinking of major coastal cities around the globe, contributing to more frequent, severe, and protracted floodingLand subsidence can occur naturally, but human activities have accelerated the process in some parts of the globe, leading the land there to descend 10 times faster than sea levels are rising. Tokyo, for example, sank two meters as a result of decades of groundwater extraction. Venice suffered similar subsidence until groundwater extraction was halted there in recent years. Unless action is taken, Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, and Bangkok, among other cities, will sink below sea level. More… Discuss

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NEWS: SUPERSONIC JET’S DESIGNERS ELIMINATE WINDOWS


Supersonic Jet’s Designers Eliminate Windows

When is a window seat not a window seat? When the plane’s cabin has no windows. An aerospace company is in the process of designing a new supersonic jet, and it is planning to eliminate cabin windows entirely. Such windows, while offering passengers breathtaking views, create drag and require additional structural support that adds weight to an aircraft. This poses a challenge when building a jet meant to fly from New York to London in under four hours. Thus, in place of windows, the craft will have display screens embedded in the cabin walls that are linked to cameras mounted on the aircraft’s exterior. More… Discuss

 

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“We Want To Fight For This Cause”: Nuclear Refugees From Fukushima Join Anti-Nuke Protests


Published on Jan 17, 2014

http://www.democracynow.org – On our final day of our special broadcast from Tokyo, we speak with a Japanese resident from the town that housed part of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant who is participating in weekly protests against the resumption of nuclear power in her country. “We couldn’t bring anything from our houses. We didn’t have a toothbrush, we didn’t have a blanket. We didn’t have towels. We had nothing. It was truly hell, and we thought it would be much better to die. But now, we are here, and we can’t really give up. We want to fight for this cause,” Yukiko Kameya said as she attended a demonstration outside Prime Minister Shinzo Abe‘s official residence. “We told the prime minister many times, every week here, that we are against the re-opening of the nuclear facilities, but it doesn’t seem that he gets it. He just does whatever he wants to do anyway.” 

Watch our entire special broadcast from Japan athttp://www.democracynow.org/topics/japan.

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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Aram Khachaturian:Masquerade Suite



Khachaturina:Masquerade Suite(Waltz/Nocturne/Mazurka/Romance/Gal­op)
The Japan Sinfonia cond.by Hisayoshi Inoue
2010/05/09/Daiichi-Seimei Hall,Tokyo

 

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[La forza del destino] overure – Riccardo Muti, Wiener Philharmoniker



Verdi – La Forza del Destino ‘Overture’ (encore) 

Wiener Philharmoniker 
conducted by RICCARDO MUTI

Live at the Suntory Hall, Tokyo – Oct, 11, 2005.

O Magnum Mysterium: Lauridsen/arr. Reynolds: Eastman Wind Ensemble/Scatterday



O Magnum Mysterium, composed by Morton Lauridsen; arranged by H. Robert Reynolds. Eastman Wind Ensemble; Mark Davis Scatterday, conductor; recorded live in Takemitsu Hall, Tokyo, June 2004