Tag Archives: trumpet

make music part of your life series: Louis Armstrong & Duke Ellington – Mood Indigo


“Coming to prominence in the 1920s as an “inventive” cornet and trumpet player, Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the focus of the music from collective improvisation to solo performance. With his instantly recognizable deep and distinctive gravelly voice, Armstrong was also an influential singer, demonstrating great dexterity as an improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song for expressive purposes. He was also greatly skilled at scat singing.”
-Wikipedia

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Louis Armstrong Jazz jazz music song vocal album song music instruments Traditional pop jazz swing big band vocal Saxophone Clarinet Flute Vibraphone Trumpet Piano Guitar Banjo Tuba Double bass Bass guitar Vocals Trombone Drum kit

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Great Compositions/Performances: Franz Schubert – Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)



Picture: Carlo Bossoli – A Bustling Market on the Piazza Navona in Rome

Franz Schubert 

Work: Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)

Mov.I: Adagio – Allegro vivace 00:00
Mov.II: Andante 11:47
Mov.III: Menuetto: Allegretto 19:17
Mov.IV: Allegro vivace 23:30

Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra

Conductor: Michael Halász

The symphony is scored for 1 flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D, 2 trumpets in D, timpani and strings. 

The orchestration, which is balanced between strings and winds, lends itself to small chamber orchestras, as well as larger ensembles. The trumpets are scored particularly high, as in many of Schubert’s early works. Trumpet players will find, in general, the tessitura sitting between a concert D to Concert A for most of the 1st and 4th movements. In the 4th movement, Schubert pushes them up to a high D, in a repeated fashion. 

Some careful planning is needed to balance the multiple doublings between horns and trumpets.

 

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Great Performances: Wynton Marsalis: Joseph Haydn – Trumpet Concerto in E flat major



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Joseph Haydn‘s Concerto per il Clarino, (Hob.: VIIe/1) (Trumpet Concerto in E flat major) was written in 1796 for his long-time friend Anton Weidinger. Joseph Haydn was 64 years of age.

Form

The work is composed in three movements (typical of a Classical period concerto), they are marked as followed:

  • I. Allegro (sonata)
  • II. Andante (sonata)
  • III. Allegro (rondo)

In addition to the solo trumpet, the concerto is scored for an orchestra consisting of strings, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 (presumably natural) trumpets (which generally play in support of the horns or timpani rather than the solo trumpet), and timpani.

Original instrument

Anton Weidinger developed a keyed trumpet which could play chromatically throughout its entire range. Before this, the trumpet was valveless and could only play a limited range of harmonic notes by altering the vibration of the lips; also called by the name of natural trumpet. Most of these harmonic notes were clustered in the higher registers, so previous trumpet concertos could only play melodically with the high register only (e.g., Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 2). Haydn’s concerto includes melodies in the middle and lower register, exploiting the capabilities of the new instrument.

There were attempts all over Europe around the mid-classical era to expand the range of the trumpet using valves, but Weidinger’s idea of drilling holes and covering them with flute-like keys was not a success as it had very poor sound quality. Thus the natural trumpet still had continual use in the classical orchestra while the keyed trumpet had barely any repertoire. The valved trumpets used today was first constructed and used in the 1830s.

 

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Giuseppe Torelli: Sonata à cinque in D major, (G.5)



Álbum: Torelli: Trumpet Concertos
Interpretes del álbum: Thomas Hammes, Peter Leiner, Nicol Matt & European Chamber Soloists
Compositor: Giuseppe Torelli
Genero: Barroco Italiano
Año: 2004
Movimientos: Adagio-Allegro e Staccato-Adagio-Allegro

 

Schubert Symphony No 1in D major Maazel Bavarian RSO


 

The Symphony No. 1 in D major, D. 82, was composed by Franz Schubert in 1813, when he was just 16 years old. Despite his youth, No. 1 is an impressive piece of orchestral music for both its time and size. The first movement opens with a stately Adagio introduction, reminiscent of the Haydn‘s 104 in its format. The short Adagio sets off a lively Allegro vivace.

The symphony is scored for 1 flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D, 2 trumpets in D, timpani and strings. The orchestration, which is balanced between strings and winds, lends itself to small chamber orchestras, as well as larger ensembles. The trumpets are scored particularly high, as in many of Schubert’s early works. Trumpet players will find, in general, the tessitura sitting between a concert D to Concert A for most of the 1st and 4th movements. In the 4th movement, Schubert pushes them up to a high D, in a repeated fashion. Some careful planning is needed to balance the multiple doublings between horns and trumpets.

 

Georges Enesco: Légende for trumpet and piano (1906), Maurice André


Georges Enesco: Légende for trumpet and piano (1906).

Maurice André, trumpet.
Jean Hubeau, piano.

Smoke house blues-Wynton Marsalis a la Morton1994



Smokehouse Blues Marsalis 1994 

Jelly Roll Morton recorded the Smoke House Blues in 1926. It has always been a top classic piece of jazz. I hardly ever heard a band playing this tune or even trying. 
But here is this trumpet master Wynton Marsalis playing it 1994 with a select number of New Orleans musicians. 
On clarinet is Dr.Michael White and the pianist is Steve Pistorius. 
It is amazing how the band conquered the feeling of the original recording and still be able to give it its own spark. The musicians , even in their solos stay close to the original. plays All together very impressive and cleverly done.

 

Chris Botti (trumpet) “Easter Parade”



Christopher Stephen Botti or Chris Botti [BOH-tee] (born October 12, 1962) is an American trumpeter and composer. Born in Portland, Oregon and raised in Corvallis, Oregon, he spent two years of his childhood growing up in Italy. His earliest musical influence was his mother, a classically trained pianist and part-time piano teacher.
He plays a Martin Committee Handcraft trumpet made in 1940, and uses a 3 silver plated mouthpiece from Bach made in 1926, having recently retired his 1920 3C Bach mouthpiece. He counts Miles Davis among his most significant influences.
Botti attended Mount Hood Community College in Gresham, Oregon where he studied under Larry McVey whose renowned jazz program had come to be a regular stop for Stan Kenton and Mel Tormé when they were looking for new players. It was here he played alongside his friend, trombonist and future Academy Award nominated filmmaker, Todd Field.
After leaving Mount Hood, Botti studied under David Baker and Bill Adam at Indiana University.