Tag Archives: Twentieth Century

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION (ISO) IS FOUNDED (1947)


International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Is Founded (1947)

The ISO is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies from some 100 countries. It was founded in Geneva after World War II to promote the development of standardization and related activities, with a view to facilitating the international exchange of goods and services as well as intellectual, scientific, technological, and economic cooperation. At first glance, ISO appears to be an acronym for the group’s full name, but it is not. Rather, it is derived from a Greek word for what? More… Discuss

 

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Today’s Birthday: GEORGES-MARIE GUYNEMER (1894)


Georges-Marie Guynemer (1894)

A top French fighter ace during World War I and a national hero, Guynemer shot down 53 enemy planes and survived being shot down several times before he presumably died in a firefight on September 11, 1917. During an engagement that fateful day, Guynemer’s plane disappeared, reportedly shot down by a German pilot who was himself killed in action weeks later. To ease the blow of the loss of their young hero, French schoolchildren were taught that what had happened to him? More…

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: PUBLISHING MAGNATE ROBERT MAXWELL DIES MYSTERIOUSLY AT SEA (1991)


Publishing Magnate Robert Maxwell Dies Mysteriously at Sea (1991)

A Czechoslovakian Jew, Maxwell fled to the UK during World War II and joined the British army. After the war, he purchased publishing house Pergamon Press. The company’s success helped him win election to Parliament in 1964, but a 1969 financial scandal cost him control of Pergamon and his political career. He regained control of the company in 1974 and rejuvenated and expanded his empire. What did investigators discover about Maxwell’s business dealings after his mysterious drowning death? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: MARIE OF EDINBURGH, QUEEN OF ROMANIA (1875)


Marie of Edinburgh, Queen of Romania (1875)

No ordinary queen, Marie took an active role in Romania‘s wartime activities, beginning with helping bring the country into the Allied camp in World War I and ending with her representation of Romanian interests in territory negotiations at the close of the war. In the interim, the “Soldier Queen” also contributed to the war effort by volunteering as a nurse with the Red Cross and publishing a book whose proceeds went to the same cause. Marie later became the first royal adherent of what faith? More…Discuss

 

NO MAN’S LAND


No Man’s Land

No man’s land is territory whose ownership is unclear or under dispute and is often unoccupied. The term—then spelled “nonesmanneslond”—was likely first used in medieval Europe to describe a contested territory or refuse dumping ground between fiefdoms. During WWI, it was used to refer to the land between enemy trenches too dangerous to occupy, and during the Cold War, it became associated with territories near the Iron Curtain. What stretch of no man’s land is known as the “Cactus Curtain“? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: Gloria Swanson (1899-1983) “I love you so much that I hate you”


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Swanson, Gloria

Swanson, Gloria, 1899–1983, American movie actress, b. Chicago. Swanson began her film career in 1913, displaying an elegant comedic style in a series of films for director Cecil B. DeMille. Financed by Joseph Kennedy, she produced her own films from 1920 until 1929, including Sadie Thompson (1928) and Queen Kelly (1928). Although she made an easy transition to sound movies, she retired in 1934. She made a celebrated return in Sunset Boulevard (1950), portraying an aging, half-mad, silent movie queen. She made only three more films, but enjoyed continued success on television. Swanson appeared on Broadway in a revival of Twentieth Century (1952) and in Butterflies Are Free (1971).