Tag Archives: United Nations

Catholic News Agency: For Middle East Christians, UN indifference is deadly


Refugees who have fled from ISIS and arrived in Ankawa, in the northern part of Erbil, Iraq. Credit: www.ankawa.com.

Refugees who have fled from ISIS and arrived in Ankawa, in the northern part of Erbil, Iraq. Credit: http://www.ankawa.com. Refugees who have fled from ISIS and arrived in Ankawa, in the northern part of Erbil, Iraq. Credit: http://www.ankawa.com.

For Middle East Christians, UN indifference is deadly

.- Inaction on the part of the United Nations and international community toward the brutality of ISIS has drawn criticism from a refugee and scholar who says the lives of Christians are at risk.

Raad Salam Naaman, a Chaldean Catholic and professor of Islamic Studies, sees a “totally deplorable and very strange” attitude on the part of the United Nations and the international community in the face of “the murders and crimes” of the Islamic State.

He told CNA that the international community is acting “as if Middle Eastern Christians mean nothing to them,” despite their sufferings under the violent Islamic radicals.

“They don’t care about the expansion and growth of this group,” said Naaman, who teaches Arabic philology and Islamic Studies at Complutense University of Madrid.

Born near Mosul, the professor has lived as a political refugee in Spain since 1991.

For Naaman, the Islamic State group, also known as ISIS, is not a state but a “band of murderers and thieves.”

He charged that the group is “the fruit of the so called ‘Arab Spring,’ one of the many mistakes made by the West.” He said the Arab Spring uprisings “aided these revolts and protests pulled off by Islamic radicals.” Many of the radicals had ties to the Muslim Brotherhood and helped overthrow governments run by secular Arab dictators, he argued.

The year 2010 marked the beginning of several popular “Arab Spring” uprisings that has toppled the governments of Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen.  Political instability and sometimes violence followed. An uprising against Syria’s President Bashar Al-Assad unleashed a civil war now in its fourth year.

There is continued political instability in Iraq, which has worsened since the withdrawal of American troops between 2010 and 2011.

The Islamic State group, especially active in Iraq and Syria, witnessed significant successes in 2014 when it took the major city of Mosul. The group’s leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, then proclaimed an Islamic caliphate in its territory in both countries. The group has imposed a strict version of Islamic law and persecuted Christians, other religious minorities, and Muslims they consider to be apostate. The group has enslaved women, murdered children, and destroyed churches.

It has encouraged radical groups such as the Libyan group Ansar al Sharia to join them. The Libyan group in February released a video of the beheading of 20 Coptic Christians from Egypt and a non-Christian from Chad.

Naaman said the Islamic State group “threatens our Western civilization and is a danger for the future of our human rights, for liberty and democracy which western society was able to attain after centuries of struggle.”

He said that the West should “correct its mistakes” and eliminate “this radical gang of Islamic murderers.”

In that respect, the Iraqi refugee echoes the call of the Vatican’s Secretary of State Cardinal Pietro Parolin, who warned that rise of the caliphate in Libya demands “quick intervention.”

However, the cardinal said any military intervention should be “under the auspices of the U.N.”

Naaman said that bombing Islamic State targets will not eliminate them. He said the U.S. and the U.N. need to call for a U.N.-led coalition to attack the group and its followers “on the ground, and with a resolute army.”

“That is the only solution,” he said.

Naaman’s statements came as the Islamic State perpetrated a mass kidnapping of more than 200 Assyrian Christians in northwestern Syria. While at least 19 of the victims were released, it is feared the rest will be executed en masse.
 

Advertisements

#PopeFrancis leads a #Candlemas procession in the Vatican — Catholic News Agency


Fabbrica di paste #watercolor #pencil #illustration #pasta #Italy — Virginia (@myartpainting)


http://www.virginiart.net/aboutme.html

http://www.virginiart.net/aboutme.html (access this site when you click!)

Google translates:

The Good Things and the Bad Things of Today:

Beautiful things today: the sparrows that seek and found crumbs of food provided just in time, religious songs of women that fill my heart with joy and hope, the elderly gentlemen who smile at me.
The colorful fruits in stalls, the flame of the candle that doesn’t extinguish, greeting without exception everyone who who was here before me my time, the heavenly part of the sky.
The reflection of the sun on the bells, the wind that refreshes the skin, a mother holding the hand of his son, the marijuana that grows wild.
The bleating of goats, the sound of cymbals and drums, children laughing merrily.
A homeless man on the street who loves me!

The bad things of today are those who do not want to see!!!

_Virginia

 

United Nations News Centre – UN: Palestine moves to join International Criminal Court, numerous global treaties


English: The building of the International Cri...

English: The building of the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands Deutsch: Das Gebäude des Internationalen Strafgerichtshofes in Den Haag, Niederlande (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Permanent Observer of the State of Palestine to the UN Riyad Mansour (right) speaks to the press. UN Photo/Evan Schneider

Permanent Observer of the State of Palestine to the UN Riyad Mansour (right) speaks to the press. UN Photo/Evan Schneider

 UN: Palestine moves to join International Criminal Court, numerous global treaties

Permanent Observer of the State of Palestine to the UN Riyad Mansour (right) speaks to the press. UN Photo/Evan Schneider

More information here:  http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=49723#.VKb6RnuWxL9

2 January 2015 – Palestinian Authority officials today presented to the United Nations documents for accession to 16 international conventions and treaties, including the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC), the world body has confirmed.

The documents – for accession to conventions and treaties for which the UN Secretary-General performs depositary functions – are being reviewed with a view to determining the appropriate next steps, according to a note issued to the media by a UN spokesperson.

via United Nations News Centre – UN: Palestine moves to join International Criminal Court, numerous global treaties.

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: Indian Ocean Tsunami Strikes (2004)


Indian Ocean Tsunami Strikes (2004)

A tsunami is a series of massive waves generated when a body of water is rapidly displaced. The deadliest tsunami in recorded history, the Indian Ocean tsunami killed some 230,000 people in Indonesia, Thailand, India, Sri Lanka, and other countries as far away as Somalia on the Horn of Africa. It was triggered by an undersea earthquake near Sumatra with a magnitude of between 9.1 and 9.3 and inundated coastal communities with waves up to 100 ft (30 m) high. How far away were the effects felt? More… Discuss

‘Why I Came To Help Fight Ebola’ – World Food Programme Uploaded on Nov 26, 2014


‘Why I Came To Help Fight Ebola’

Saint of the Day for Sunday, November 23rd, 2014: Bl. Miguel Pro


Image of Bl. Miguel Pro

Bl. Miguel Pro

Born on January 13, 1891 in Guadalupe, Mexico, Miguel Agustin Pro Juarez was the eldest son of Miguel Pro and Josefa Juarez. Miguelito, as his doting family called him, was, from an early age, … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

this Pressed: At @FAOnews conference, @Pontifex urges concrete action in global nutrition challenge— United Nations (@UN)



UN Panel: Fossil Fuels Must Be Phased Out by 2100

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a UN-backed panel of experts, has concluded that the unrestricted use of fossil fuels without carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology should be phased out by 2100 if we are to avoid dangerous climate change. While the costs of phasing out fossil fuel use and transitioning to renewable energy sources will undoubtedly be steep, failing to make the necessary changes will be more costly in the long run. More… Discuss

this pressed for your wight to be informermed: US to affirm that UN torture ban applies overseas


Official photographic portrait of US President...

Official photographic portrait of US President Barack Obama (born 4 August 1961; assumed office 20 January 2009) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

US to affirm that UN torture ban applies overseas

The U.S. is telling the United Nations that it now considers a ban against torture to apply to prisoners held by the U.S. overseas.

Under the Bush administration, the U.S. interpreted the U.N. Convention Against Torture to apply only within U.S. borders. That meant the U.S. didn’t have to follow the ban on cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment at places like the Guantanamo Bay prison or aboard U.S. ships.

President Barack Obama took a different approach and banned certain interrogation methods after taking office. But until now, the U.S. hadn’t formally conveyed that policy to the U.N. body monitoring compliance with the treaty.

The White House says the U.S. will tell the U.N. this week that it interprets the ban as applying anywhere under U.S. government control, including Guantanamo Bay.

via US to affirm that UN torture ban applies overseas.

This pressed for your right to know: In U.N. Speech, Noam Chomsky Blasts United States for Supporting Israel, Blocking Palestinian State | Democracy Now!


In U.N. Speech, Noam Chomsky Blasts United States for Supporting Israel, Blocking Palestinian State | Democracy Now!.

AMY GOODMAN: Professor Noam Chomsky, speaking last Tuesday in the hall of the U.N. General Assembly before about 800 people, ambassadors and the public alike. The event was hosted by the U.N. Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People. After he spoke, I interviewed him in front of the audience. We’ll play highlights after break.

********* Video Interview and  Full Transcript  >>>>   here

today’s holiday: World Food Day


World Food Day

Proclaimed in 1979 by the conference of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, World Food Day is designed to heighten public awareness of the world food problem and to promote cooperation in the struggle against hunger, malnutrition, and poverty. October 16 is the anniversary of the founding of the FAO in Rome, Italy, in 1945. More… Discuss

this pressed- for your right to know: United Nations|Noam Chomsky Addresses the Press Ahead of Lecture at UN


“identifer:607/607266” : Noam Chomsky Addresses the Press Ahead of Lecture at UNUN Photo/Yubi Hoffmann

 

Noam Chomsky Addresses the Press Ahead of Lecture at UN

Noam Chomsky, Professor Emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), addresses a press conference before his lecture on the prospects for resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, organized by the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People.

14 October 2014

United Nations, New York

Photo # 607266

 

 

 

 

via United Nations Photo.

this day in the yesteryear: Massacre in Qibya (1953)


Massacre in Qibya (1953)

In 1953, in response to escalating border clashes with Palestinians, Israeli forces raided the Jordanian West Bank village of Qibya, which was believed to be harboring militants. Codenamed “Operation Shoshana,” the attacks led to the deaths of more than 60 Palestinians and the demolition of numerous houses, as well as a school and a mosque. The United Nations condemned Israel’s actions. What future prime minister of Israel was the commander of the special forces unit that carried out the attack? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: World Space Week


World Space Week

In 1999, the United Nations designated October 4-10 as World Space Week. The week celebrates the contributions that space science and technology have made to improving life on Earth. October 4 was chosen to commemorate the former USSR‘s October 4, 1957, launch of Sputnik, the first manmade satellite in space. October 10 honors the 1967 signing of the UN Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Battle of Mogadishu Begins (1993)


Battle of Mogadishu Begins (1993)

In 1992, US armed forces, together with the United Nations, undertook a joint relief operation in Somalia, a country wracked by civil war and famine. Increasing violence in the area led to “Operation Gothic Serpent,” a US mission to capture Somali warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid‘s top advisors, but two US helicopters were shot down, and an urban battle ensued. Eighteen US servicemen and thousands of Somalis died in the fighting. What went wrong even before the helicopters were shot down? More… Discuss

From Democracy Now: After U.S. Sanctions & Wars Tore Iraq Apart, Can American-Led Strikes Be Expected to Save It?


After U.S. Sanctions & Wars Tore Iraq Apart, Can American-Led Strikes Be Expected to Save It?

news: It’s a Vast World After All


It’s a Vast World After All

The world’s population currently stands at 7.2 billion and is projected to rise to between 9.6 and 12.3 billion by the end of this century. Earlier estimates had forecast a leveling off of world population around 2050, but higher-than-expected birth rates in sub-Saharan Africa mean the number of people on the planet will likely continue to rise instead. In Africa alone, the population is expected to rise from the current 1 billion to between 3.5 and 5.1 billion by 2100. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Marshall Islands Manit Day


Marshall Islands Manit Day

In the Marshall Islands, Manit Day is part of the annual cultural festival Lutok Kobban Alele, which aims to promote and preserve the Marshallese culture. On Manit Day, people can set up booths outside the Alele Museum, Library, and National Archive—which displays exclusive and original artifacts of the Marshall Islands—to sell their handicrafts, food, and drinks. As part of the celebration, children have the opportunity to perform dances, sing songs, perform skits, or tell folklore stories. More… Discuss

$1 Billion Needed to Fight Ebola (doctors without borders are needed at….borders without doctors)


$1 Billion Needed to Fight Ebola

With the Ebola outbreak in West Africa still uncontained, the UN is increasing its calls for funding in the fight against the epidemic from $100 million just a month ago to $1 billion today. This health crisis, the World Health Organization’s assistant director-general says, is “unparalleled in modern times,” with thousands infected thus far and the number of cases projected to double every three weeks if containment efforts are not stepped up. According to the president of the medical charity Doctors Without Borders, the response to the outbreak has been insufficient thus far and the window of opportunity to contain the outbreak is closing. More… Discuss

from Democracy Now: Will Iraq or Syria Survive? UN Envoy Lakhdar Brahimi on Sectarian War & the Disastrous ’03 Invasion


Will Iraq or Syria Survive?  UN Envoy Lakhdar Brahimi on Sectarian War and the Disastrous 03' Invasion.

Will Iraq or Syria Survive? UN Envoy Lakhdar Brahimi on Sectarian War and the Disastrous 03′ Invasion. (click to access program)

As a Sunni militancy overtakes large parts of Iraq, former U.N.-Arab League special envoy Lakhdar Brahimi joins us to discuss the escalating Iraqi conflict, the long-term impact of the 2003 U.S. invasion, and the crisis in neighboring Syria. A former Algerian freedom fighter who went on to become Algeria’s foreign minister, Brahimi has been deeply involved in Middle Eastern diplomacy for decades. He has worked on many of the world’s major conflicts from Afghanistan and Iraq to South Africa. Brahimi resigned as the U.N.-Arab League special envoy for Syria last month after a lengthy effort that failed to bring about peace talks between the Syrian government and rebel groups. On the legacy of the U.S. invasion and subsequent occupation of Iraq, Brahimi says: “The biggest mistake was to invade. I am tempted to say that every time there was a [U.S.] choice between something right and something wrong, not very often the right option was taken.” On Syria, Brahimi says the conflict is “an infected wound … if not treated properly, it will spread — and this is what is happening.”
 

Transcript

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: Sunni militants have seized part of Iraq’s largest oil refinery located in the northern Iraqi city of Baiji. The militants reportedly now control three-quarters of the refinery complex. Meanwhile, Shiite families are leaving the city of Baquba in droves out of fear the militants from ISIS, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, will soon seize the city. Baquba is located just 40 miles from Baghdad. Many analysts say the fighting in Iraq has become a proxy war between the Sunni-led Saudi Arabia and Shiite-led Iran. On Tuesday, Iran’s president, Hassan Rouhani, vowed on live television to protect Shiite shrines in Iraq. Rouhani said many Iranians have already signed up to go to Iraq to fight. This came as Iraq’s Shiite-led Cabinet accused Saudi Arabia of promoting genocide in Iraq by backing Sunni militants.

In Washington, President Obama is scheduled to meet today with the four top congressional leaders. There are conflicting reports of his plan of action. The Wall Street Journal reports Obama has decided against immediate airstrikes in Iraq, but The New York Times reports Obama is considering what the paper described as a “targeted, highly selective campaign” of airstrikes. One official told the Times the campaign would most likely use drones and could last for a prolonged period.

Joining us to discuss the situation in Iraq and across the wider region is Lakhdar Brahimi, who resigned his post last month as the United Nations-Arab League special envoy for Syria. Brahimi has been deeply involved in Middle Eastern diplomacy for decades. He’s a former Algerian freedom fighter who went on to become Algeria’s foreign minister. As a diplomat, he has worked on many of the world’s biggest conflicts, from Afghanistan and Iraq, from Haiti to South Africa. He’s a member of the Elders, a group of retired statesmen formed in July 2007 at the initiative of Nelson Mandela; it was originally chaired by Archbishop Desmond Tutu, now by Kofi Annan.

Democracy Now!’s Nermeen Shaikh and I interviewed Lakhdar Brahimi on Tuesday. He’s in Paris, France. I started by asking him to respond to what’s happening in Iraq right now.

LAKHDAR BRAHIMI: Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham have invaded and taken control of the second-largest city in Iraq, which is absolutely extraordinary. That is the city of Mosul. I understand that they went down also and took a part—or, you know, maybe they are still there—of the city of Tikrit, the birthplace of Saddam Hussein, and that they were marching on Baghdad, and they have been stopped somewhere. And I doubt very much that they will enter Baghdad in any significant manner. But this indicates the fragility of the state of Iraq that has been created by the Americans after they invaded the country in 2003. It’s really extraordinary that the state, as important and as rich, as a matter of fact, as Iraq, cannot protect the second-largest city in the country.

It also vindicates what the secretary-general of the United Nations and myself have been saying for months, years even. And that is that the situation in Syria is like an infected wound: If it is not treated properly, it will spread. And this is what is happening. You know, the secretary-general has very often warned that if Syria is not attended to properly, then most, if not all, of its neighbors were in danger. And this is one of the neighbors of Syria.

Of course, it had—it has its own problems. And this latest development is an addendum, something that has come on top of the problems that were there. Those problems were that the country was more and more divided along sectarian lines, and the corruption was rife, and the government was not capable—has not been capable of re-establishing services, like water, electricity, sewages and so on, at the level they existed under Saddam, when the country was under extremely severe sanctions.

So, this is where we are. Syria is—you know, there is fighting there. There is killing. There is—bombardments are taking place. And people are—you know, there is no development taking place, and people are leaving their homes, their villages, their cities, either remaining inside the country as internally displaced people or going to neighboring countries like Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey, in particular. And quite a few of them have gone to Iraq, actually.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: Ambassador Brahimi, you mentioned the complicity of the United States invasion of 2003 in the present situation in Iraq.

LAKHDAR BRAHIMI: Yes.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: I want to turn to comments made by former British Prime Minister Tony Blair over the weekend. He said, in fact, the 2003 invasion of Iraq was not responsible for the violent insurgency now engulfing the country. He was speaking on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show. Let’s just go to a clip.

TONY BLAIR: So my point is very simple: Even if you left Saddam in place in 2003, then, when 2011 happened and you had the Arab revolutions going through Tunisia and Libya and Yemen and Bahrain and Egypt and Syria, you would have still had a major problem in Iraq. Indeed, you can see what happens when you leave the dictator in place, as has happened with Assad now. But if you say to me, would I prefer a situation where we’d left Saddam in place in 2003—do I think the region would be safer, more stable, if we’d done that—my answer to that is unhesitatingly no.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: Ambassador Brahimi, that was former British Prime Minister Tony Blair speaking over the weekend.

LAKHDAR BRAHIMI: Yes.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: Could you respond to the comments he made about the 2003 invasion?

LAKHDAR BRAHIMI: You know, the situation in Iraq was extremely bad, and definitely it was called the “Republic of Fear” with reason. You know, you cannot justify post facto an invasion that was absolutely horrible. I mean, first of all, it was unjustified. Second—I mean, it was built on a lie. You know, the weapons of mass destructions were just in the imagination of some people who wanted to invade Iraq. Second, things have—I mean, justifications were invented after—democracy, getting rid of a dictator, and I don’t know what. That very dictator, when he was just as a dictator as he was in 2003, was a very good friend of the United States and of Britain when he was fighting Iran in the ’80s. But let’s, you know, forget about that for the moment. So, the invasion was absolutely horrible.

And this—you know, it has—I mean, let’s talk about what is—what is important to talk about now: terrorism. There was no terrorism. There were no terrorists in Iraq in those days. Terrorism was sucked in, brought in, by—as a direct consequence of the invasion. And it flourished, first of all, in Iraq, and then it went to Syria, and now it is back in Iraq. So, to say that 2003 had nothing to do with what is happening now is a little bit an—I don’t know—overstatement, understatement. Certainly not reality.

AMY GOODMAN: Ambassador Brahimi, Paul Bremer, the first head of the so-called coalitional—Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq, one of the first things he did in that role was to sign the Coalition Provisional Authority Orders 1 and 2, completely dismantling Iraq’s government and military. During your tenure as U.N. special envoy for Iraq, you referred to Bremer as, quote, “the dictator of Iraq.” Writing in The Wall Street Journal over the weekend in the wake of the present violence that’s engulfing Iraq, Bremer said, quote, “It is time for both American political parties to cease their ritualistic incantations of ‘no boots on the ground,’ which is not the same as ‘no combat forces.’ Of course Americans are reluctant to re-engage in Iraq. Yet it is President Obama’s unhappy duty to educate them about the risks to our interests posed by the unfolding drama in Iraq.” Can you elaborate, Ambassador Brahimi, on your comments about Paul Bremer being dictator of Iraq and what that meant for Iraq?

LAKHDAR BRAHIMI: You know, I was just repeating something that he said himself. I think he said—and he has written, I think, in his memoirs—that nobody in the history of Iraq had as much power as he had. For my money, that is equivalent to being a dictator. And he was doing everything he wanted.

And you have mentioned, you know, the dissolution of the army. Every American who knew anything about Iraq, and there were quite a few, many of them in government—former ambassadors, people who know Arabic, who know the country, who know the region—they were all unanimous: Don’t touch the army. There are definitely, you know, 10, 15, 100, 1,000 officers that have, you know, blood on their hands, that are corrupt, that should be taken off the army. But keep the army. This is the backbone of the country, and it is going to cooperate with you. And as a matter of fact, a lot of people, including in the military, were already talking to some of the Iraqi militaries to see how they can come back and reorganize themselves and work with the occupying power. But Mr. Bremer—and he was saying that he was under instructions from the secretary of state for defense, Mr. Rumsfeld—said, “No, no, no. We will dissolve the army.” And they went ahead and did it. I think that—you know, I don’t think there is any, any, any argument that that was a mistake then.

Should—what should the Americans do today? I fully understand the hesitation of President Obama to send foreign troops in, American troops into Iraq again. As a principle, foreign troops meddling in an internal situation like this is not a very good idea. I also hear that there is a possibility that they will be talking to Iran, and I’m sure that they will be talking to other neighbors of Iraq, chief of them—amongst them, Saudi Arabia, to see what needs to be done to help Iraq solve its problems and perhaps stop these terrorist organizations from making more progress. But be careful that this help from outside does not make things worse. I think that it’s—you know, there is a lot of sectarianism in Iraq. I don’t think there is a secret—that’s a secret or anybody ignores that fact or says it doesn’t exist. So, please, if you help face this ISIS, that’s great, but make sure that you don’t make things worse by making—by supporting more sectarianism, not less sectarianism.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: Ambassador Brahimi, on the question of sectarianism, there have been several reports that suggest that in the initial days of the Iraq invasion in 2003, there were some neoconservative members of the Bush administration that actively fostered sectarianism between Sunnis, Shias and Kurds as a way of—as a policy of kind of divide and rule. Could you comment on that?

LAKHDAR BRAHIMI: I have told my American friends several times, of course, I am not privy to what was taking place in the Pentagon, where responsibility lied for Iraq. President Bush had given full, total responsibility to the Pentagon over Iraq. What was discussed there and what they did there, I don’t know. But as somebody from the region just looking at what was actually taking place, it was extremely hard not to believe that sectarianism was being promoted and that the people that were being put in charge were—I mean, of course the Kurdish region was given to Kurds 100 percent, and no—the rest of the Iraqis had no part in it. But in the rest of Iraq, the impression one had was that the people that were preferred by the occupying powers were the most sectarian Shia and the most pro-Iranian Shia, so, you know, that Iran—that Iraq is now very, very close to Iran. Again, from the point of view of somebody who looks at things from outside, I have absolutely no knowledge of what went on in the high spheres of power in Washington. The impression we had is that these people were put in charge either out of total ignorance—and that is extremely difficult to accept—or intentionally. But the fact is, you know, that the system that was established was very sectarian.

AMY GOODMAN: Ambassador Lakhdar Brahimi. He resigned his post last month as United Nations-Arab League special envoy for Syria. We’ll be back with him in a moment.

[break]

AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. I’m Amy Goodman, as we continue our conversation with Ambassador Lakhdar Brahimi. He resigned as U.N.-Arab League special envoy to Syria last month. Democracy Now!’s Nermeen Shaikh and I interviewed him yesterday. He’s in Paris, France. I asked him what the gravest error of the U.S. was in its 2003 invasion of Iraq.

LAKHDAR BRAHIMI: The biggest mistake was to invade Iraq. Having invaded Iraq, you know, I would be probably very, very unfair, but I am tempted to say that every time there was a choice between something right and something wrong, not very often the right option was taken.

If you want one instance of what was wrong, it’s probably the dissolution of the army, because the army was the backbone of the country, because the army was nonsectarian. You know, the majority of the soldiers were Shia. And I think in the officer corps—it would be very interesting to take a look back—you would find that there were a lot of Shia in it. Saddam was not—you know, I mean, didn’t care about who was Sunni or who was Shia. What he cared for is who was with him and who was not, you know, who would—whom he considers as loyal 1,000 percent and whom he does not. You know, I asked some American friends, couple of times—I don’t know if you remember that deck of cards with Saddam being the ace of spades. Out of those 54 bad guys in Iraq, I used to ask my American friends whether they knew how many Shia were in that deck of cards. One of them said zero. One of them said four or five. Actually, the number of Shia in that deck of cards was 35.

During the war, I mean, Saddam was terribly unfair. Although a lot of Shia were fighting in the ranks of army of their country against Shia Iran, I think he was extremely suspicious of the Shia, because they were Shia. And he has killed a lot of religious leaders, a lot of—so, you know, there was—there was that, but nothing like what existed after that and what exists today.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: Ambassador Brahimi, you’ve suggested that sectarianism was excarcerbated following the 2003 invasion of Iraq by the U.S.

LAKHDAR BRAHIMI: Yeah, sure.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: One of the other effects, which you mentioned earlier, was the spread of terrorism, and in particular, of suicide attacks in Iraq, which prior to 2003 were unprecedented. In other words, neither Iraq nor Afghanistan nor Pakistan nor Syria had ever witnessed suicide attacks before 9/11 occurred and, subsequent to that, the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan. So could you talk about some of the implications of that, what the effects of that have been, and how you think that phenomenon, which is now so widespread, should be dealt with?

LAKHDAR BRAHIMI: It did not exist in Iraq. And, you know, this al-Qaeda did not exist at all. It had no dormant cell in Iraq. It was brought in after the invasion as a way of people coming to fight a crusader, a power, invading a sister Muslim country. That is when al-Qaeda came in and started to recruit Iraqis and to bring in non-Iraqis. The ancestor of ISIS was created as a direct consequence of the invasion of Iraq, nothing else. And, you know, it developed and so on, and you remember 2005, 2006, 2007 were absolutely horrible years in Iraq, when civil war was really taking place, with the Americans at the receiving end themselves. And, of course, they destroyed Fallujah completely; the Americans destroyed the city of Fallujah completely.

Car bombs and so on did exist before, but it did no exist in Iraq, and al-Qaeda had absolutely no presence in Iraq before the invasion. It really became a reality as a direct consequence of the invasion in 2003 and developed from there. And what you see today there is the son or the grandson of what happened in—I mean, you know, I’m sure some of your viewers may remember the name of Zarqawi, a Jordanian, very, very cruel man who was one of the leaders of the al-Qaeda in Iraq in those years, 2005, 2006. So, this is it. Al-Qaeda and what—the terrorist organizations that exist today in—as far as Iraq is concerned, and Syria, as a matter of fact, their origin is definitely post-2003.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: I want to turn to comments made by the former U.S. ambassador to Syria, Robert Ford. He resigned from his position in May. He was speaking to Christiane Amanpour on CNN earlier this month.

ROBERT FORD: I was no longer in a position where I felt I could defend the American policy. We have been unable to address either the root causes of the conflict, in terms of the fighting on the ground and the balance on the ground, and we have a growing extremism threat. And there really is nothing we can point to that’s been very successful in our policy, except the removal of about 93 percent of some of Assad’s chemical materials. But now he’s using chlorine gas against his opponents, in contravention of the Syrian government’s agreement in 2013 to abide by the Chemical Weapons Convention. The regime simply has no credibility, and our policy is not addressing the Syrian crisis as it needs to.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: That was Robert Ford, the former U.S. ambassador to Syria. Ambassador Brahimi, could you comment on what he said and also what you see the flaws with U.S. policy vis-à-vis Syria being today?

LAKHDAR BRAHIMI: I was very, very surprised when I heard him say that he left because he couldn’t support the American policy anymore. Very, very surprised that—you know, of course, I’m not familiar with what was going on inside the government and what discussions he had with the secretary of state and others before he left, but the impression I had was that he left because he reached retirement age and he was tired of dealing with a very, very difficult problem in Syria. That was understandable. This is—this is something, you know, very surprising to me, what he said about him not capable of supporting the U.S. policy anymore. Again, the view in the region was that he was making the policy, or at least he was taking a very, very important part in making that policy.

You know, what was wrong with American policy, I think every single party that dealt with Syria over the last three years have made mistakes. The United States, like everybody else, misjudged the meaning and the—you know, what was happening and, you know, where things were going. You know, mistakes were made in Tunisia, when everybody thought that, you know, President Ben Ali was so strong, so well organized, that these demonstrations are going to last two days, three days, three or two weeks, and then they will be over and the men will be there. He left after less than a month. Mubarak in Egypt—you know, Egypt is a stable country, a very well-organized country. Their police was tremendously strong and well equipped. They will manage to—you know, to ride this storm. And to be fair, the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, they took quite a while. They were telling those young people, I mean, “Go home. You know, you are going to be killed for nothing. The regime is not going to fall.” This is—this was—so, everybody made a mistake there. So when the—you know, and Libya, Libya, the country, you know, everybody thought that Libya would fall in a matter of days. It took several months and several billion dollars spent by the Americans, the French, the British and others in bombarding and destroying the country. And, by the way, look at the results: They are not great.

When the turn of Syria came, I think, understandably, everybody said, “Ah, OK, you know, this is now the trend. People—I mean, this regime resist one month, three weeks, six months. So this will be the case in Syria.” So I think that the Americans, like everybody else, thought that the regime was going to fall, and everybody started talking about the day after. And people were afraid that they would not be ready for the day after, that the regime will fall, and we will not be ready how to help the country rebuild and so on and so forth. It has taken maybe almost three years, three, four years, before people started to realize that this was different. And by the way, the Russians were the first who said this—Syria is not going to follow suit to what happened in Tunisia and Egypt; the regime is not going to fall. And nobody listened to them. I think if we had, perhaps it would have been better for all of us.

AMY GOODMAN: Why did you quit as former U.N. and Arab League envoy for Syria?

LAKHDAR BRAHIMI: You know, I wanted to quit one year before I did, because in these kind of jobs, you come and try a few ideas and then move on. This is not a 9:00 to 5:00 job that you do for years and years. That is one reason.

The second reason is that, you know, we organized that conference in Montreux, Switzerland, and we moved from there to what we thought was going to be negotiations between the opposition and the government. And that was a failure, mainly because of the government. And then the government announced that they were organizing presidential elections, meaning that they were going a totally different way from what we were discussing in Geneva. So I think it was the normal thing for me to do.

I have tried this working with the Russians and the Americans. Together, the three of us have organized the Geneva II Conference. I led those discussions, two rounds of discussions in Geneva. That has taken us nowhere. I think it is time to tell the Syrian people we are not delivering, and we—I apologize to them for that, but also to tell everybody else, “Please be careful. This is—this is a very, very bad, very complicated, very dangerous situation, and you have got to pay more attention to it.” I hope that, you know, they will pay a little bit more attention and that they will help the secretary-general, Ban Ki-moon, who is really devoting a great deal of attention to Syria. I hope that he will be helped to do a better job than I have been able to do until the end of May.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: Ambassador Brahimi, you’ve also suggested, in an interview you gave to the German news magazine Der Spiegel earlier this month, that the situation in Syria is so much worse than it was in Afghanistan in 1999 when you resigned your U.N. position there. Could you explain why you think that’s the case?

LAKHDAR BRAHIMI: You know, in Afghanistan, there was a, yeah, civil war, but the factions in Afghanistan were not over-armed the way the parties that are involved in Syria are. There was—you know, nobody had the aviation that the Syrian government has or the tanks and the artillery that they have. It was, you know, this horrible war, low-intensity civil war. And, you know, the Afghans were, in their way, much better organized and also much more open in their discussions with us. For example, we never had, in all those wars of civil war—you know, after the Russians left, anyway, that’s the part I know—we never had any problem going for the vaccination in spring. All the factions knew that teams from the United Nations were going to go all over the country and vaccinate kids. And that happened. It hasn’t been that easy in Syria.

You know, the Russians had destroyed quite a little bit of the country, and the Afghans, very early on, before the Taliban, destroyed Kabul when the Russians left. But after that, there wasn’t that kind of destruction that you see in Syria now. Homs—friends who went to Homs recently told me that it looks like the pictures we see of Berlin in 1945. So the level of destruction is absolutely horrible. You know, when I arrived on the scene in ’97, with the years of Russians and the—of the internal civil war between the factions, there was something like five million refugees from Afghanistan. In three years only, in Syria, we have two million and a half refugees, six or seven million internally displaced. And by next year, if things continue the way they are, we are going to have four million refugees—population being about the same, 23 million in Syria, maybe 25 or 26 [million] in Afghanistan. So, the level of violence and destruction is much higher in Syria than it was in Afghanistan.

AMY GOODMAN: Lakhdar Brahimi, who resigned his post last month as United Nations-Arab League special envoy for Syria. We’ll be back with him in a minute.

Esperanto


Esperanto

Esperanto is an artificial language that was introduced in 1887 by Dr. L.L. Zamenhof, a Polish linguist. His goal was to ease communication between speakers of different languages. Its words are derived from roots commonly found in European languages and are spelled as pronounced. Grammar is simple and regular. Although no nation has officially adopted Esperanto, it has more than one million speakers and has been taught in schools throughout the world. What is the origin of the name “Esperanto”? More… Discuss

Flash – Israel plan to seize West Bank land ‘alarms’ UN’s Ban – France 24


Flash – Israel plan to seize West Bank land ‘alarms’ UN’s Ban – France 24.

quotation: Fyodor Dostoyevsky, “One can know a man from his laugh…”


One can know a man from his laugh, and if you like a man’s laugh before you know anything of him, you may confidently say that he is a good man.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881) Discuss

Security Council: The situation in the Middle East, including the Palestinian question


Security Council: The situation in the Middle East, including the Palestinian question

United Nations Webcast- webtv.un.org

United Nations Webcast- webtv.un.org (Click to access)

this pressed: United Nations News Centre – ‘Appalled’ by attack on UN-run school in Gaza, Ban urges halt to all fighting


United Nations News Centre – ‘Appalled’ by attack on UN-run school in Gaza, Ban urges halt to all fighting.

this pressed: Official Vents Outrage at Shelling of U.N. Schools in Gaza – NYTimes.com


Official Vents Outrage at Shelling of U.N. Schools in Gaza – NYTimes.com.

NO WAY: Overpopulation


FROM WIKIPEDIA:  Overpopulation

Population growth that exceeds the carrying capacity of an area or environment results in overpopulation.[21] Spikes in human population can cause problems such as pollution, water crisis,[22][23] and poverty.[24][25] World population has grown from 1.6 billion in 1900 to an estimated 7 billion today. In Mexico alone, population has grown from 13.6 million in 1900 to 107 million in 2007.[26] Virginia Abernethy notes that immigration is a road that provides a “relief valve” to overpopulation that stops a population from addressing the consequences of its overpopulation and that exports this overpopulation to another location or country.[27]

In 2000, the United Nations estimated that the world’s population was growing at the rate of 1.14% (or about 75 million people) per year. According to data from the CIA’s World Factbook, the world human population currently increases by 145 every minute.[28] The United States Census Bureau issued a revised forecast for world population that increased its projection for the year 2050 to above 9.4 billion people, up from 9.1 billion people. There are a billion more added every 12 years. Almost all growth will take place in the less developed regions.[29]

today’s birthday: Trygve Lie (1896)


Trygve Lie (1896)

The United Nations was established in 1945, and Lie, a Norwegian politician, became its first Secretary General the next year. His role required that he take an active part in a variety of negotiations, but the Soviet Union ceased to cooperate with him after he supported UN intervention in the Korean War, and his effectiveness was further hampered by charges from anticommunist politicians in the US that his secretariat had employed subversives. What was the impetus for Lie’s resignation in 1952? More… Discuss

word: deplorable


deplorable 

Definition: (adjective) Worthy of severe condemnation or reproach.
Synonyms: condemnable, criminal, reprehensible, vicious
Usage: He had committed a deplorable act of violence, and the judge gave him the maximum sentence for his crime. Discuss.

NEWS: UN FEARS SLAUGHTER IN CAR


UN Fears Slaughter in CAR

Despite the presence of thousands of French and African Union peacekeeping troopssectarian violence continues to be a serious problem in the Central African Republic(CAR). Tensions between Christians and Muslims there have reached a “terrifying level,” according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), and nearly 16,000 people living in the capital, Bangui, have had to flee their homes in recent weeks. The UNHCR, fearful that Muslims in areas near the capital are now at risk of being “slaughtered” by Christian militia, is working to evacuate some 19,000 Muslims from these areas. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S SAINT: ST. BERTHOLD March 29


SAINT OF THE DAY

March 29 Saint of the Day

ST. BERTHOLD
March 29: Considered by some historians to be the founder of the Carmelite … Read More

March
29
Enhanced by Zemanta

ARTICLE: MASS TRIALS IN EGYPT


Mass Trials in Egypt

Just a day after Egyptian courts drew international condemnation for sentencing to death 529 members of the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood in a two-day, mass trial, another trial is underway. The United Nations human rights office asserts that the mass death sentences contravene international law, but this has not deterred the courts from bringing charges against another 683 Muslim Brotherhood supporters, including some of its leaders. It seems likely that this trial will run much the same course as the first one. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: WORLD DAY FOR WATER


World Day for Water

In 1992, the United Nations declared March 22 World Day for Water. Programs associated with the day draw attention to the ways in which proper water resourcemanagement contributes to a nation’s economic and social vitalityMore… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY


International Women’s Day

This day commemorating women is one of the most widely observed holidays of recent origin. It has its roots in the March 8, 1857, revolt of women in New York City, protesting conditions in the textile and garment industries, although it wasn’t proclaimed a holiday until 1910. In Great Britain and the United States, International Women’s Day is marked by special exhibitions, films, etc., in praise of women. In the former U.S.S.R., women received honors for distinguished service in industry, aviation, military service, and other fields. More… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Archbishop Chullikatt: Flagrant and widespread persecution of Christians in Middle East §RV


Enhanced by Zemanta

Georges Brassens – Il n’y a pas d’amour heureux (live) 1965 (‘…Sa vie elle ressemble à ces soldats sans armes Qu’on avait habillés pour un autre destin A quoi peut leur servir de ce lever matin Eux qu’on retrouve au soir désarmés incertains Dites ces mots ma vie et retenez vos larmes…’)


Georges Brassens – Il n’y a pas d’Amour Heureux, 1965
(music de Georges Brassens – poeme de Louis Aragon)

Rien n’est jamais acquis à l’homme. Ni sa force
Ni sa faiblesse ni son cœur. Et quand il croit
Ouvrir ses bras son ombre est celle d’une croix
Et quand il croit serrer son bonheur il le broie
Sa vie est un étrange et douloureux divorce

Il n’y a pas d’amour heureux

Sa vie elle ressemble à ces soldats sans armes
Qu’on avait habillés pour un autre destin
A quoi peut leur servir de ce lever matin
Eux qu’on retrouve au soir désarmés incertains
Dites ces mots ma vie et retenez vos larmes

Il n’y a pas d’amour heureux

Mon bel amour mon cher amour ma déchirure
Je te porte dans moi comme un oiseau blessé
Et ceux-là sans savoir nous regardent passer
Répétant après moi les mots que j’ai tressés
Et qui pour tes grands yeux tout aussitôt moururent

Il n’y a pas d’amour heureux

Le temps d’apprendre à vivre il est déjà trop tard
Que pleurent dans la nuit nos cœurs à l’unisson
Ce qu’il faut de malheur pour la moindre chanson
Ce qu’il faut de regrets pour payer un frisson
Ce qu’il faut de sanglots pour un air de guitare

Il n’y a pas d’amour heureux

Il n’y a pas d’amour qui ne soit à douleur
Il n’y a pas d’amour dont on ne soit meurtri
Il n’y a pas d’amour dont on ne soit flétri
Et pas plus que de toi l’amour de la patrie
Il n’y a pas d’amour qui ne vive de pleurs

Il n’y a pas d’amour heureux

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Codex Alimentarius Explained



This is from documentary called “Waking Up Canada To The New World Order”
found on http://youtube.com/WakingUpCanada

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

NEWS: UN: HALF OF SYRIANS NOW IN URGENT NEED OF AID


UN: Half of Syrians Now in Urgent Need of Aid

The situation in Syria is dire. According to UN estimates, half of the Syrian population is in urgent need of aid. The bloody uprising that began in 2011 has claimed more than 100,000 lives and displaced millions. Some 2.3 million people have fled Syria for neighboring countries, and more than twice this number are displaced within the country. About 9.3 million Syrians, nearly half of whom are children, are now in desperate need of assistance. The UN is appealing to the international community for $6.5 billion (£4 billion), the largest UN appeal for a single cause to date. More… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

this day in history: USSR EXPELLED FROM THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS (1939)


USSR Expelled from the League of Nations (1939)

The League of Nations was an international confederation of countries created after World War I and disbanded following World War II when many of its functions were transferred to the United Nations. The League collapsed when faced with threats to international peace from all sides in the 1930s, including the Spanish civil war, Japan’s resumption of war against China, and the appeasement of Adolf Hitler at Munich. Its last important act was to expel the Soviet Union in 1939 for doing what? More… Discuss

UN OBSERVES WORLD TOILET DAY


UN Observes World Toilet Day

In the developed world, we tend to take sanitation for granted, but more than one-third of the people on Earth still lack access to essential sanitary facilities like bathrooms. Without proper sanitation, human waste contaminants enter the environment and water supply, leading to the spread of disease. Lack of access to bathroom facilities also compromises people’s dignityand safety and has been found to limit social and economic development. The issue is largely ignored, however, because publicly addressing toilets and bodily functions is generally considered taboo. So, in an effort to raise awareness and spur the international community to action, the UN yesterday observed World Toilet Day for the first time. More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: THE UNITED NATIONS IS FORMALLY ESTABLISHED (1945)


The United Nations Is Formally Established (1945)

The United Nations (UN) is an international organization founded to promote peace, security, and economic development. Representatives from the US, the UK, the Soviet Union, and China first met in 1944 to discuss the problems involved in creating such an agency, and the results of their talks became the basis for the UN Charter that was ratified in 1945. Established immediately after WWII, it replaced the essentially powerless League of Nations. Who first coined the term “United Nations”? More… Discuss

 

Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon and Stevie Wonder Address the Audience at the Global Citizen Festival


unitednationsunitednationsunitednationsunitednationsunitednations

Published on Oct 17, 2013

The Secretary-General appeared on stage on 28 September at the Global Citizen Festival with United Nations Messenger of Peace Stevie Wonder; together with 60,000 activists in Central Park, they lifted their voices to end extreme poverty.
unitednationsunitednationsunitednationsunitednationsunitednations

 

HAITIANS SUE UN IN US COURT OVER CHOLERA OUTBREAK


Haitians Sue UN in US Court over Cholera Outbreak

Victims of a cholera outbreak in Haiti that has killed more than 8,300 people and sickened more than 650,000 since late 2010 have filed a multibillion-dollar lawsuit against the UN in US court. Though a UN-appointed panel concluded that it could not definitively identify the epidemic‘s source, an American investigation found strong evidence to suggest that UN peacekeepers from Nepal, where the disease is endemic, touched off the epidemic in Haiti by dumping raw sewage near a river used for drinking water. Earlier this year, the UN formally rejected victims’ requests for compensation, prompting them to take legal actionMore… Discuss

 

From Democracy Now: “The Empire President: Jeremy Scahill on Obama’s “Neo-Con” Doctrine of Military Force in U.N. Speech”


From Democracy Now:  “In an address to the United Nations General Assembly, President Obama openly embraced an aggressive military doctrine backed by previous administrations on using armed force beyond the international norm of self-defense. Obama told the world that the United States is prepared to use its military to defend what he called “our core interests” in the Middle East: U.S. access to oil. “[Obama] basically came out and said the U.S. is an imperialist nation and we’re going to do whatever we need to do to conquer areas [and] take resources from people around the world,” says independent journalist Jeremy Scahill. “It’s a really naked declaration of imperialism … When we look back at Obama’s legacy, this is going to have been a very significant period in U.S. history where the ideals of very radical right-wing forces were solidified. President Obama has been a forceful, fierce defender of empire.”

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: UN GENERAL ASSEMBLY ADOPTS DECLARATION ON THE RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES (2007)


UN General Assembly Adopts Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007)

Over two decades in the making, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was finally adopted in 2007 despite opposition from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the US. The non-binding declaration prohibits discrimination against the world’s estimated 370 million indigenous people and outlines their rights, among them the rights to culture, identity, language, employment, and education. What were some of the key issues that delayed the drafting and adoption of the declaration? More…Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: INTERNATIONAL DAY OF THE DISAPPEARED OBSERVED BY UN FOR FIRST TIME (2011)


International Day of the Disappeared Observed by UN for First Time (2011)

The International Day of the Disappeared on August 30 is an annual commemoration day to draw attention to the fate of individuals imprisoned at places unknown to their relatives and without legal process. The impulse for the day came from the Latin American Federation of Associations for Relatives of Detained-Disappeared, a non-governmental organization founded in 1981 in Costa Rica. When did the United Nations adopt the Declaration on the Protection of All Persons from Enforced DisappearanceMore… Discuss

 

SYRIAN CRISIS HAS CREATED ONE MILLION CHILD REFUGEES


Syrian Crisis Has Created One Million Child Refugees

As reports emerge of another alleged chemical weaponattack by the Syrian government against its own people, the flood of refugees out of the war-torn country has continued. This week, the one millionth child refugee fledSyria. Another two million children are displaced within the country. The UN High Commissioner for Refugeesworries that an entire generation of Syrian youth is now at risk, as even those that escape physical harm may well suffer psychological trauma as a result of the violence and losses they have endured. The current refugee crisis is the worst in decades, reaching levels not seen since the Rwandan genocideMore… Discuss

 

This Day in History: UN General Assembly Adopts Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948)


UN General Assembly Adopts Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948)

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Image by Jordan Lewin via Flickr

Drafted by a committee chaired by Eleanor Roosevelt, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is the world’s most translated document. Among its 30 articles are definitions of civil and political rights, as well as definitions of economic, social, and cultural rights—all of which are owed by UN member states to those under their jurisdiction. Since its adoption, it has acquired more juridical status than originally intended and has been widely used, even by national courts, in what ways? More… Discuss

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Image by duncan via Flickr

UC Davis will probe use of pepper-spray on student protesters (from KTLA TV) Do you want to see police brutality? Here is one example, just click on the picture)


UC Davis will probe use of pepper-spray on student protesters (from KTLA TV)

UC Davis will probe use of pepper-spray on student protesters (from KTLA TV) Do you want to see police brutality? Here is one example, just click here)

From KTLA: “As indicated in various videos, the police used pepper spray against the students who were blocking the way,” she said. “The use of pepper spray as shown on the video is chilling to us all and raises many questions about how best to handle situations like this.”

Student protesters at Davis had set up an encampment in the university’s quad area earlier this month as part of the nationwide Occupy movement against economic inequality and excesses of the financial system.

Their demonstrations, which had been endorsed by a faculty association, included protests against tuition increases and what they viewed as police brutality on University of California campuses in response to recent protests.

The students had set up roughly 25 tents in a quad area, but they had been asked not to stay overnight and were told they would not be able to stay during the weekend, due to a lack of university resources, Katehi said.

Some protesters took their tents down voluntarily while others stayed. The pepper spray incident appeared to take place on Friday afternoon, when campus police moved in to forcibly evict the protesters.

Katehi said on Friday she was “saddened” by the manner in which protesters were removed from the quad, and on Saturday announced a task force of faculty, students and staff to investigate the incident.
(Source: http://www.ktla.com/news/landing/sns-rt-us-protests-davis-pepperspraytre7ai0za-20111119,0,372487.story)
 

My take on it: Economical Inequality is inequality to life. And is a fundamental human right, guaranteed by the Universal Declaration of  Human Rights. Read more about it, and find out what are your rights, guaranteed by the Organization of the United Nations at: http://www.hrweb.org/legal/undocs.html