Tag Archives: United State

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

February 6

1626   Huguenot rebels and the French sign the Peace of La Rochelle.
1778   France recognizes the United States and signs a treaty of aid in Paris.
1788   Massachusetts becomes the sixth state to ratify the Constitution.
1862   The Battle of Fort Henry, Tenn., begins the Mississippi Valley campaign.
1891   The Dalton Gang commits its first crime, a train robbery in Alila, Calif.
1899   The Spanish-American War ends.
1900   President McKinley appoints W.H. Taft commissioner to report on the Philippines.
1904   Japan’s foreign minister severs all ties with Russia, citing delaying tactics in negotiations over Manchuria.
1916   Germany admits full liability for Lusitania incident and recognizes the United State’s right to claim indemnity.
1922   The Washington Disarmament Conference comes to an end with signature of final treaty forbidding fortification of the Aleutian Islands for 14 years.
1926   Mussolini warns Germany to stop agitation in Tyrol.
1929   Germany accepts Kellogg-Briand pact.
1933   Adolf Hitler’s Third Reich begins press censorship.
1936   Adolf Hitler opens the Fourth Winter Olympics.
1941   The RAF clears the way as British take Benghazi, trapping thousands of Italians.
1944   Kwajalein Island in the Central Pacific falls to U.S. Army troops.
1945   MacArthur reports the fall of Manila, and the liberation of 5,000 prisoners.
1963   The United States reports that all Soviet offensive arms are out of Cuba.
1964   Cuba blocks the water supply to Guantanamo Naval Base in rebuke of the United State’s seizure of four Cuban fishing boats.
1964   Paris and London agree to build a rail tunnel under the English Channel.
1965   Seven U.S. GIs are killed in a Viet Cong raid on a base in Pleiku.
1968   Charles de Gaulle opens the 19th Winter Olympics in France.
1975   President Gerald Ford asks Congress for $497 million in aid to Cambodia.
1977   Queen Elizabeth marks her Silver Jubilee.
1982   Civil rights workers begin a march from Carrolton to Montgomery, Alabama.
Born on February 6
1756   Aaron Burr, 3rd U.S. Vice President.
1895   George Herman “Babe” Ruth, baseball player with the Boston Red Sox, the New York Yankees and the Boston Braves. The first player to hit 60 home runs in one season.
1911   Ronald Reagan, film actor and 40th U.S. President (1981-1989).
1913   Mary Douglas Leakey, archaeologist and paleoanthropologist.
1932   Francois Truffaut, French film director (The 400 Blows, Shoot the Piano Player).
1933   Walter E. Fountroy, politician and civil rights leader.
1940   Tom Brokaw, NBC News anchorman.
1945   Bob Marley, reggae musician.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.0sRMZjpc.dpuf

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this pressed for your right to know: What We Were Told About Ebola|FactCheck.org


At a July 28 press briefing concerning the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official Stephan Monroe said the virus “poses little risk to the U.S. general population.” But, he added, “it’s possible that someone could become infected with the Ebola virus in Africa and then get on a plane to the U.S.” Monroe called this scenario a “very remote possibility,” but he didn’t say it could never happen, as the senator claimed.

via What We Were Told About Ebola |FactCheck.org

today’s holiday: Tuvalu Independence Day


Tuvalu Independence Day

Independence Day is the only national celebration in Tuvalu, which consists of nine islands in the South Pacific with a total surface area of 10 square miles. The day is marked in the capital city of Funafuti with an official government flag-raising ceremony followed by a parade of policemen and schoolchildren; similar events are held in smaller communities throughout the country. Also held in addition to several days of feasting and dance is the Independence Day Sports Festival, in which citizens enjoy a number of sporting competitions. More… Discuss

The Irish Potato Famine


The Irish Potato Famine

By the early 1840s, nearly half of the Irish population, particularly the rural poor, depended almost entirely on the potato for sustenance. The Irish Potato Famine, which lasted from 1845 to 1849, led to the deaths of more than a million people from starvation or famine-related diseases. A watershed moment in Ireland’s demographic history, it also provoked a massive exodus, and the British government‘s minimal relief efforts worsened Anglo-Irish relations. What caused the potato crop to fail? More… Discuss

word: pusillanimous


pusillanimous 

Definition: (adjective) Lacking courage; cowardly.
Synonyms: spineless, craven
Usage: Why, you pusillanimous piece of dirt, you’d run with your tail between your legs if I said boo! Discuss.

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: JEFFERSON’S BIRTHDAY


Jefferson’s Birthday

Unique among American presidents, Thomas Jefferson(1743-1826) was not only a statesman but a scholar, linguist, writer, philosopher, political theorist, architect, engineer, and farmer. In the United States, he is remembered primarily as the author in 1776 of the Declaration of Independence; he died on July 4, 1826, the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration. A birthday commemoration is held each year at Monticello, Jefferson’s home in Virginia, as well as at the Jefferson Memorial on the Mallin Washington, D.C. More… Discuss

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WHAT WENT VIRAL: Official Coca-Cola “Big Game” Commercial 2014 – America Is Beautiful


WHAT WENT VIRAL:  

Published on Feb 2, 2014/ 5,689,830 VIEWS

The only thing more beautiful than this country are the people who live here. Watch the Official Coca-ColaBig Game” Commercial and discover why #AmericaIsBeautiful.

For more, visit our playlist: http://youtube.com/AmericaIsBeautiful

Follow our updates on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/cocacola

Read more about the creation of this ad, go behind the scenes, and meet each of the young singers here: http://CokeURL.com/txmdu
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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: ELIZABETH BLACKWELL (1821)


Elizabeth Blackwell (1821)

Blackwell chose to pursue a medical education at a time when doctors were almost exclusively male. Consequently, she was rejected by many medical schools before one in New York accepted her. In 1849, she became the first woman in the US to receive a medical degree, but her struggle did not end there. Barred from practice in most hospitals, she, her sister, and another female doctor founded their own practice and later a women’s medical college. How did a joke gone wrong give Blackwell her start?More… Discuss

 

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Battlefield America _ U.S. Citizens Face Indefinite Military Detention in Defense Bill Before Senate (from Democracy Now)


Battlefield America _ U.S. Citizens Face Indefinite Military Detention in Defense Bill Before Senate (from Democracy Now)
Battlefield America _ U.S. Citizens Face Indefinite Military Detention in Defense Bill Before Senate (from Democracy Now) (click here to find out about this grave issue)

The Senate is set to vote this week on a Pentagon spending bill that could usher in a radical expansion of indefinite detention under the U.S. government. A provision in the National Defense Authorization Act would authorize the military to jail anyone it considers a terrorism suspect — anywhere in the world — without charge or trial. The measure would effectively extend the definition of what is considered the military’s “battlefield” to anywhere in the world, even within the United States. Its authors, Democratic Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan and Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona, have been campaigning for its passage in a bipartisan effort. But the White House has issued a veto threat, with backing from top officials including Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, and FBI Director Robert Mueller. “This would be the first time since the McCarthy era that the United States Congress has tried to do this,” says our guest, Daphne Eviatar of Human Rights First, which has gathered signatures from 26 retired military leaders urging the Senate to vote against the measure, as well as against a separate provision that would repeal the executive order banning torture. “In this case, we’ve seen the administration very eagerly hold people without trial for 10-plus years in military detention, so there’s no reason to believe they would not continue to do that here. So we’re talking about indefinite military detention of U.S. citizens, of lawful U.S. residents, as well as of people abroad.” [Includes rush transcript] (source: http://www.democracynow.org/2011/11/29/battlefield_america_us_citizens_face_indefinite)

Senators Demand the Military Lock Up American Citizens in a “Battlefield” They Define as Being Right Outside Your Window (From ACLU – November 28, 2011)


Senators Demand the Military Lock Up American Citizens in a 'Battlefield' They Define as Being Right Outside Your Window
Senators Demand the Military Lock Up American Citizens in a ‘Battlefield’ They Define as Being Right Outside Your Window (click to get informed from ACLU)

Senators Demand the Military Lock Up American Citizens in a “Battlefield” They Define as Being Right Outside Your Window

While nearly all Americans head to family and friends to celebrate Thanksgiving, the Senate is gearing up for a vote on Monday or Tuesday that goes to the very heart of who we are as Americans. The Senate will be voting on a bill that will direct American military resources not at an enemy shooting at our military in a war zone, but at American citizens and other civilians far from any battlefield — even people in the United States itself.

Senators need to hear from you, on whether you think your front yard is part of a “battlefield” and if any president can send the military anywhere in the world to imprison civilians without charge or trial. (source: http://www.aclu.org/blog/national-security/senators-demand-military-lock-american-citizens-battlefield-they-define-being)

This Day in History: New York Draft Riots (1863)


New York Draft Riots (1863)

The New York Draft Riots, in which more than 100 civilians were killed, were the largest civil insurrection in US history after the Civil War. The rioters were mainly working-class men who were angry because, for a $300 fee, the wealthy could buy their way out of the Civil War draft. The rioters burned draft headquarters and other buildings. Mobs also attacked African Americans, whom they blamed for the war. The riots are portrayed in an alternate-history novel co-written by what politician? More… Discuss