Tag Archives: United States Armed Forces

Behavior of Military Lawyer in Boondoggle HQ Inquiry Under Scrutiny – ProPublica


Behavior of Military Lawyer in Boondoggle HQ Inquiry Under Scrutiny

Several U.S. Senators and military lawyers say they are concerned by Col. Norm Allen’s attempts to thwart an investigation into why the U.S. Military built an unneeded luxury headquarters in Afghanistan.

by Megan McCloskey

ProPublica, May 28, 2015, 12:13 p.m.

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Col. Norman F. Allen, right, receives the Legion of Merit from Gen. David M. Rodriguez in 2013. (Jim Hinnant, U.S. Army Forces Command Public Affairs)

An investigation released last week into why the U.S. military built a $25-million headquarters in Afghanistan that it never used condemned the behavior of one officer in particular: the top commander‘s lawyer.

In a series of emails to other officers in 2013 and 2014, Army Col. Norm Allen said that he wanted to “slow roll” investigators, that he wouldn’t personally cooperate out of loyalty to the command, and that he would consider it inappropriate for others to do so. The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR)

via Behavior of Military Lawyer in Boondoggle HQ Inquiry Under Scrutiny – ProPublica.

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Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
January 16

1547   Ivan IV crowns himself the new Czar of Russia in Assumption Cathedral in Moscow.
1786   The Council of Virginia guarantees religious freedom.
1847   John C. Fremont, the famed “Pathfinder” of Western exploration, is appointed governor of California.
1865   General William T. Sherman begins a march through the Carolinas.
1900   The U.S. Senate recognizes the Anglo-German Treaty of 1899 by which the UK renounced its rights to the Samoan Islands.
1909   One of Ernest Shackleton‘s polar exploration teams reaches the Magnetic South Pole.
1914   Maxim Gorky is authorized to return to Russia after an eight year exile for political dissidence.
1920   The League of Nations holds its first meeting in Paris.
1920   Allies lift the blockade on trade with Russia.
1939   Franklin D. Roosevelt asks for an extension of the Social Security Act to include more women and children.
1940   Hitler cancels an attack in the West due to bad weather and the capture of German attack plans in Belgium.
1942   Japan’s advance into Burma begins.
1944   Eisenhower assumes supreme command of the Allied Expeditionary Force in Europe.
1945   The U.S. First and Third armies link up at Houffalize, effectively ending the Battle of the Bulge.
1956   The Egyptian government makes Islam the state religion.
1965   Eighteen are arrested in Mississippi for the murder of three civil rights workers.
1975   The Irish Republican Army calls an end to a 25-day cease fire in Belfast.
1979   The Shah leaves Iran.
1991   The Persian Gulf War begins. The massive U.S.-led offensive against Iraq — Operation Desert Storm — ended on February 28, 1991, when President George Bush declared a cease-fire, and Iraq pledged to honor future coalition and U.N. peace terms.
Born on January 16
1757   Samuel McIntire, architect of Salem, Massachusetts.
1749   Vittorio Alfieri, Italian tragic poet (Cleopatra, Parigi shastigliata).
1821   John C. Breckinridge, 14th U.S. Vice President, Confederate Secretary of War.
1909   Ethel Merman, U.S. singer and actress, the “Queen of Broadway.”

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.jAbTuryQ.dpuf

word: querulous


querulous 

Definition: (adjective) Given to complaining; peevish.
Synonyms: fretful, whiny
Usage: The teacher’s patience was wearing thin, but the querulous student nevertheless continued to whine about how much homework she was assigning. Discuss.

this pressed: Thank You for Your Service: How One Company Sues Soldiers Worldwide – ProPublica


Thank You for Your Service: How One Company Sues Soldiers Worldwide – ProPublica.

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: BATAAN DAY


Bataan Day

This is a national legal holiday in the Philippines, in commemoration of the disastrous World War II Battle of Bataan in 1942, in which the Philippines fell to the Japanese. It is also known as Araw ng Kagitingan, or Heroes Day. Also remembered on this date are the 37,000 U.S. and Filipino soldiers who were captured, and the thousands who died during the infamous 70-mile “death march” from Mariveles to a Japanese concentration camp inland at San Fernando. Ceremonies are held at Mt. Samat Shrine, the site of side-by-side fighting by Filipino and American troopsMore… Discuss

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Battlefield America _ U.S. Citizens Face Indefinite Military Detention in Defense Bill Before Senate (from Democracy Now)


Battlefield America _ U.S. Citizens Face Indefinite Military Detention in Defense Bill Before Senate (from Democracy Now)
Battlefield America _ U.S. Citizens Face Indefinite Military Detention in Defense Bill Before Senate (from Democracy Now) (click here to find out about this grave issue)

The Senate is set to vote this week on a Pentagon spending bill that could usher in a radical expansion of indefinite detention under the U.S. government. A provision in the National Defense Authorization Act would authorize the military to jail anyone it considers a terrorism suspect — anywhere in the world — without charge or trial. The measure would effectively extend the definition of what is considered the military’s “battlefield” to anywhere in the world, even within the United States. Its authors, Democratic Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan and Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona, have been campaigning for its passage in a bipartisan effort. But the White House has issued a veto threat, with backing from top officials including Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, and FBI Director Robert Mueller. “This would be the first time since the McCarthy era that the United States Congress has tried to do this,” says our guest, Daphne Eviatar of Human Rights First, which has gathered signatures from 26 retired military leaders urging the Senate to vote against the measure, as well as against a separate provision that would repeal the executive order banning torture. “In this case, we’ve seen the administration very eagerly hold people without trial for 10-plus years in military detention, so there’s no reason to believe they would not continue to do that here. So we’re talking about indefinite military detention of U.S. citizens, of lawful U.S. residents, as well as of people abroad.” [Includes rush transcript] (source: http://www.democracynow.org/2011/11/29/battlefield_america_us_citizens_face_indefinite)

Senators Demand the Military Lock Up American Citizens in a “Battlefield” They Define as Being Right Outside Your Window (From ACLU – November 28, 2011)


Senators Demand the Military Lock Up American Citizens in a 'Battlefield' They Define as Being Right Outside Your Window
Senators Demand the Military Lock Up American Citizens in a ‘Battlefield’ They Define as Being Right Outside Your Window (click to get informed from ACLU)

Senators Demand the Military Lock Up American Citizens in a “Battlefield” They Define as Being Right Outside Your Window

While nearly all Americans head to family and friends to celebrate Thanksgiving, the Senate is gearing up for a vote on Monday or Tuesday that goes to the very heart of who we are as Americans. The Senate will be voting on a bill that will direct American military resources not at an enemy shooting at our military in a war zone, but at American citizens and other civilians far from any battlefield — even people in the United States itself.

Senators need to hear from you, on whether you think your front yard is part of a “battlefield” and if any president can send the military anywhere in the world to imprison civilians without charge or trial. (source: http://www.aclu.org/blog/national-security/senators-demand-military-lock-american-citizens-battlefield-they-define-being)