Tag Archives: United States

Lone Christian in Iraqi Delegation, a Nun, Denied Visa by Obama State Dept. | The Stream


Read the article “Lone Christian in Iraqi Delegation, a Nun, Denied Visa by Obama State Dept.” here: http://www.nationalreview.com/article/417679/malice-toward-nun-nina-shea

Sister Diana wants to tell Americans about ISIS persecution of Christians in Iraq, but the State Department won’t let her in. Why is the United States barring a persecuted Iraqi Catholic nun — an internationally respected and leading representative of the Nineveh Christians who have been killed and deported by ISIS — from coming to Washington to testify about this catastrophe? Earlier this week, we learned that every member of an Iraqi delegation of minority groups, including representatives of the Yazidi and Turkmen Shia religious communities, has been granted visas to come for official meetings in Washington — save one. The single delegate whose visitor visa was denied happens to be the group’s only Christian from Iraq. Sister Diana Momeka of the Dominican Sisters of Saint Catherine of Siena was informed on Tuesday by the U.S. consulate in Erbil that her non-immigrant-visa application has been rejected.

via Lone Christian in Iraqi Delegation, a Nun, Denied Visa by Obama State Dept. | The Stream.

Iraqi Christians have lost everything – except their faith, nun tells Congress :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


By Matt Hadro

Photo:  Sister Diana Momeka, OP appeared before the House of Foreign Affairs Committee in Washington D.C. on May 13, 2015. Credit: Matt Hadro/CNA.

Washington D.C., May 13, 2015 / 03:41 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Having lost their homes, their heritage and their sense of dignity, Iraqi Christians victimized by the Islamic State feel abandoned by earthly powers, but their faith in God has only grown, an Iraqi nun told members of Congress May 13.

The faith of homeless Iraqi Christians is “increasing more and more,” Sister Diana Momeka, O.P., told the U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee.

Many of the displaced lived in devastating conditions – families taking shelter in containers, parents without jobs and children without an education.

But Sister Diana insisted the spirit of the people has not been broken by the adversity.

“It’s making us stronger,” she said.

“We were displaced, yet we feel that the hand of God is still with us…In the midst of this darkness, this suffering, we see that God is holding us,” she explained, adding that it is a “gift of the Holy Spirit” to be able to stay and have faith through hardship.

Sister Diana was part of the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena, originally from Mosul in Northern Iraq. Islamist militants bombed their convent in 2009, and after the prioress sought protection from the local government and found none, Sister Diana and the community moved to Qaraqosh.

The ISIS onslaught caught up to them last summer. As the Islamic State swept through parts of Iraq and Syria, establishing a strict caliphate, more than 120,000 Iraqis were displaced on the Nineveh Plain, faced with the decision to convert to Islam, stay and pay a jizya tax to ISIS, or leave immediately.

The religious community moved again, this time to Kurdistan. “We were driven out of our homes in a couple of hours,” the nun described, “without any warning.”

Almost no Christians are left in Mosul, Sister Diana said, except for about 100 Christian hostages of ISIS.

Slated to testify before a congressional committee as part of an Iraqi delegation, Sister Diana’s application for a visa was initially denied by the local U.S. Consulate because of her status as an internally-displaced person.

Amid mounting pressure, she was later able to enter the United States and testified before the U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee May 13 regarding “ISIS’s war on religious minorities.”

“I am but one, small person – a victim myself of ISIS and all of its brutality,” Sister Diana stated in written testimony before the committee.

“Coming here has been difficult for me – as a religious sister I am not comfortable with the media and so much attention,” she admitted. “But I am here and I am here to ask you, to implore you for the sake of our common humanity to help us.”

The Christians in Northern Iraq lost “most everything” when ISIS destroyed and desecrated churches, shrines, and other sacred sites, she said.

“We lost everything that today, every Christian that’s living in the region of Kurdistan, we feel we don’t have dignity anymore. When you lose your home, you lose everything you have. You lose your heritage, your culture.”

When monasteries that have existed for centuries have been destroyed, it is a sign that “your history is gone, you are nothing anymore,” the Iraqi nun explained.

Children are growing up without proper education and whole families’ lives have “changed tremendously,” she said. “We’re abandoned, that’s how we feel.”

The local and regional authorities have been of little help to the displaced, Sister Diana said in her testimony, calling their reaction to the crisis “at best modest and slow.” The Kurdish government allowed Christian refugees to enter its borders but did not offer any more significant aid.

The Church in Kurdistan has been a big help to Christians, though, providing food, shelter, and other support, she noted.

Ultimately, the displaced want to return home and not to be re-settled elsewhere, witnesses at the hearing insisted.

“There are many who say ‘Why don’t the Christians just leave Iraq and move to another country and be done with it?’“ Sister Diana stated in her testimony. “Why should we leave our country? What have we done?”

“The Christians of Iraq are the first people of the land,” she said. “While our ancestors experienced all kinds of persecution, they stayed in their land, building a culture that has served humanity for the ages.”

“We want nothing more than to go back to our lives; we want nothing more than to go home.”

Tags: Refugees, Faith, ISIS, Iraqi Christians

via Iraqi Christians have lost everything – except their faith, nun tells Congress :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

 

The Black Death


The Black Death

The Black Death was a form of bubonic plague

The bubonic plague described by Athanasius Kircher

The bubonic plague described by Athanasius Kircher (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

that was pandemic throughout Europe, the Middle East, and much of Asia in the 14th century. Thought to have been caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, it killed between one-third and half of Europe’s population and at least 75 million people worldwide. Recently, it has been argued that the Black Death was not caused by bubonic plague, at all, but by what? More… Discuss

A woman says she was fired after she deleted an app that her boss used to track her, 24/7: — CNNMoney (@CNNMoney) May 13, 2015


 

this day in the yesteryear: Battle of Palmito Ranch Ends (1865)


Battle of Palmito Ranch Ends (1865)

More than a month after Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, ending the American Civil War, fighting continued in other regions. The Battle of Palmito Ranch was fought in Texas on May 12-13, 1865, and was the last major clash of arms in the war. It ended with a Confederate victory, with 118 Union soldiers killed and a few dozen rebels wounded. Who was the last casualty of the battle—and likely the last of the war? More… Discuss

Picture of the day: Photographs of the American West: 1861-1912 (A Pioneer Family in Loup Valley, Nebr., ca. 1886. Cropped from Item 134. (69-N-13606C)


Photographs of the American West: 1861-1912

Cover photograph: A Pioneer Family in Loup Valley, Nebr., ca. 1886. Cropped from Item 134. (69-N-13606C)

By 1848 the United States had acquired official title to the contigous land stretching westward to the Pacific, south to the Rio Grande, and north to the 49th parallel. Americans had long since explored and settled in many of these areas, but legitimate possession created an impetus for development that began to crystallize as other timely occurrences brought a greater influx of people to the West. The religious persecution of the Mormons had led them to begin their migration westward by this time. The discovery of gold would soon draw thousands more across the country.

This transition from a “wild” western frontier into organized segments of a federal union is documented in photographs. Private citizens and Government officials took the recently developed camera on their western adventures to record nature’s curious sights and the marks that they as men and women made on the landscape. It is indeed a wonder that so many photographs have survived the hardships of the western experience, for early negatives were made of large glass plates. Some of these photographs have found their way into the National Archives as record materials of several Federal bureaus and offices, such as the Bureaus of Land Management, Indian Affairs, Public Roads, Weather, Agricultural Economics, and Reclamation; the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Geological Survey, boundary and claims commissions and arbitrations, the Corps of Engineers, the Forest Service, and the Signal Corps. The photographs listed below were selected from the records of these agencies now on deposit in the National Archives.

While the records of Federal agencies continue to document changes on the face of western America and the efforts toward effecting some kind of progress, an arbitrary cutoff date of 1912 has been used. At that time Arizona, the last of the contiguous 48 United States, was admitted to the Union. Having arrived at its destiny, the “Wild” West was in a sense officially terminated.

The captions in quotation marks are those of the photographer or the person who cared for the photographs before they came into the custody of the National Archives. Within quoted captions, bracketed material has been added by the compiler. Information following quoted captions and all captions without quotes has been provided by the compiler. The name of the photographer together with the date of the item is given if available. The listings are arranged by subject–such as transportation, lndian life, military life, and mining–and thereunder chronologically. An index appears at the end of the list. The index is arranged by State, the names of which usually are the same as their former territorial designations. Some entries appear under more than one State; others could not be indexed by State.

The back cover of this leaflet explains how to order complete sets of slides of all photographs described in this pamphlet and in the other Select Audiovisual Records leaflets. To order individual prints, negatives, or slides, write to the Still Picture Branch for a current pricelist. Many photographs of the American West are not included in this list. Separate inquiries about them should be as specific as possible, including names, dates, places, and other details.

The research, selection, and arrangement in preparing this select list was done by Charlotte Palmer, who also wrote these introductory remarks.      More

quotation: In diving to the bottom of pleasure we bring up more gravel than pearls. Honore de Balzac


In diving to the bottom of pleasure we bring up more gravel than pearls.

Honore de Balzac (1799-1850) Discuss

 

In diving to the bottom of pleasure we bring up more gravel than pearls.  - Honore de Balzac

this day in the yesteryear: Soviet Union Lifts Blockade of Berlin (1949)


Soviet Union Lifts Blockade of Berlin (1949)

One of the first major crises of the Cold War, the Berlin blockade began in June 1948 during the multinational occupation of post-WWII Germany. In an attempt to force its former wartime allies—the US, the UK, and France—out of Berlin, the USSR began a blockade of all rail, road, and water traffic through East Germany to West Berlin. Rather than withdraw, the Western powers bypassed the blockade by airlifting thousands of tons of supplies into the city each day. What was Operation Little Vittles? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Frost Saints’ Days


Frost Saints’ Days

These three consecutive days in May mark the feasts of St. Mammertus, St. Pancras, and St. Servatus. In the wine-growing districts of France, a severe cold spell occasionally strikes at this time of year, inflicting serious damage on the grapevines; some in rural France have believed that it is the result of their having offended one of the three saints, who for this reason are called the “frost saints.” French farmers have been known to show their displeasure over a cold snap at this time of year by flogging the statues and defacing the pictures of Mammertus, Pancras, and Servatus. More… Discuss

Dust Bowl: Dust Storm Hits Great Plains (1934) (Watch the documentary!)


Dust Bowl: Dust Storm Hits Great Plains (1934)

In the 1930s, severe drought conditions in the Great Plains region of the US and decades of farming without crop rotation led to a series of devastating dust storms. The storms, called “dusters” or “black blizzards,” caused widespread ecological and agricultural damage. In May 1934, one of the worst storms to hit the Dust Bowl blew massive amounts of Great Plains topsoil all the way to the East Coast and dumped the equivalent of how many pounds of debris on Chicago, Illinois? More… Discuss

Stinging Dust & Forgotten Lives: The Dust Bowl (2008)

Uploaded on Aug 30, 2011

Ponder for a moment that you are huddled around a dimly lit lamp in a vast dusty room with your family. All eyes have a look of fear from the gusty winds shaking your home. The next morning, after the storm blows over, you look outside to find your house, barn, animals, fence, and water well have all been buried by feet of soil. All is lost. You must live…but how?

Over a hundred years ago people left the American east to find a better life. They migrated and established homestead throughout the Great Plains. There, they would prosper with fields of plenty, until, they exhausted the land. Again, they migrated westward to find a better life and provide opportunities for their starving children. STINGING DUST & FORGOTTEN LIVES presents the effects of the Dust Bowl on humanity during the 1930s. Meteorological conditions are often the first to blame, however, it was economic gain of the nation that doubled the unfortunate fate of the dusters.

For more information visit tcpfilms.com/​sdfl

Copyright 2008 by Cameron Douglas Craig and Kevin Harker Jeanes

Fr Gustavo Gutierrez: the poor are the starting point of liberation theology :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Fr. Gustavo Gutierrez Merino, O.P., who is regarded as the father of liberation theology. Photo courtesy of Notre Dame/Matt Cashore

Vatican City, May 8, 2015 / 01:41 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Attention to the poor was the point of departure for liberation theology claimed Fr. Gustavo Gutierrez Merino, widely acknowledged as the founder of the movement, in a May 8 article in the Vatican‘s newspaper.

Fr. Gutierrez underscored that this attention to the poor came from what liberation theologians experienced in their own lives and lands.

“We referred to the poor as non-persons, but not in philosophical sense, because it is obvious that each human being is a person, rather in a sociological sense; the poor, that is, are not accepted as persons in our society. They are invisible and have not rights, their dignity is not recognized,” the Peruvian theologian wrote.

The publication of the article may be considered a sort of response to the assertions of Ion Mihai Pacepa, a former general in communist Romania’s secret police during the Cold War who defected to the West in the 1970s. In an interview with Catholic News Agency, Pacepa said the KGB created liberation theology and helped to foster it in Latin America, a claim which garnered attention within the Vatican’s walls.

The article published in L’Osservatore Romano is in fact an excerpt from one of Fr. Gutierrez’ books. It begins by saying there are two schools of thought about poverty, and both come from the Gospel: the first is focused on Christ’s sensitivity toward the poor and their suffering, and the second, that Christ himself “had lived a life of poverty, and so Christians, from their origin, understood that in order to be his disciples they also had to live a life of poverty.”

“Both of these schools are true,” he said, but “we have to interpret these two points of view on the bases of our historical context and of our lives.”

Fr. Gutierrez said the first perspective may be found in Luke’s version of the beatitude of the poor (Blessed are you poor, for the kingdom of God is yours), while the second is reflected in Matthew’s (Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven).

“I think both lines of thought – poverty as scandal and poverty of spirit – can be useful, although their meaning must be actualized in our historical period,” reflected Fr. Gutierrez.

He explained that “a new notion of poverty” has emerged in the past century. “Poverty, in Bible and in our times, is not a merely economic issue. Poverty is very much more than this. The economic dimension is important, perhaps primary, but it is is not the only one.”

Noting that we have become more aware of the multiple dimensions of poverty, Fr. Gutierrez said, “poverty was clearly the starting point of liberation theology, though we had not fully understood its complexity or variety.”

The Dominican priest, who will speak at next week’s general assembly of Caritas Internationalis, stressed that liberation theologians referred to the poor in a sociological sense, as persons “who are invisible and and have no rights.”

“We also defined them as the “insignificant.” It is possible to be insignificant for several reasons: if you do not have money, in our society you are insignificant; the colour of your skin may be another reason to be deemed insignificant … what is common among the poor is insignificance, invisibility, and a lack of respect,” Fr. Gutierrez said.

He then added that “these mutual complexities are different from one another” and that “the sense of non-person can be caused by several prejudices,” whether based on race, sex, culture, or economic status.

Fr. Gutierrez provided the example of a black Protestant pastor, who began a 1969 speech with the words: “We must feel that we exist!” “That strong declaration is the shout of the poor,” Fr. Gutierrez said.

The Dominican also provided the example of Peru’s indigenous people, who “are invisible, irrelevant … this is the sad story of an Indian’s daily life: even when he goes to the hospital to be cured, he is ignored,” wrote Fr. Gutierrez.

He then added that “poverty today is a phenomenon of our globalized civilization. For centuries, the poor have been close to us, they lived more or less near us, in the city or in the countryside. However, today we have realized that poverty goes very much beyond our gaze, it is a global phenomenon, if not universal. The majority of human beings in the world live in the condition we call poverty.”

This is a turning point, according to Fr. Gutierrez. He emphasized that in spiritual, moral or liturgical books of the past, writers “merely spoke of how to directly help the poor, who were close to us.” But “today we should be aware that our neighbors are both near and far. We must understand that a relation of ‘neighborhood’ is the result of our commitment.”

via Fr Gustavo Gutierrez: the poor are the starting point of liberation theology :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

picture of the day: The Swedish Nightengale



The Swedish Nightengale

Swedish-born Jenny Lind (1820-1887), the greatest operatic and concert soprano of her age, was already the toast of Europe when she was approached by American showman P.T. Barnum in 1847. Even before hearing her voice, Barnum signed the ‘Swedish Nightingale‘ for 150 American concerts at the enormous sum of $150,000. With the help of Barnum’s matchless marketing, Jenny Lind mania swept America, with crowds of the rich and famous and ordinary music lovers alike falling at her feet. This 1850 daguerreotype of Miss Lind was taken by Matthew Brady.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.WIyDvPBO.dpuf

today’s holiday: Mother’s Day (United States)


Mother’s Day (United States)

The setting aside of a day each year to honor mothers was the suggestion of Anna M. Jarvis of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, whose own mother had died on May 9, 1906. She held a memorial service and asked those attending to wear white carnations—a gesture that soon became a tradition. By 1914, President Woodrow Wilson had proclaimed a national day in honor of mothers, and some people still wear carnations on the second Sunday in May—pink or red for mothers who are living and white for those who have died. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: The Panic of 1837 (1837)


The Panic of 1837 (1837)

In 1836, US President Andrew Jackson issued the Specie Circular, an executive order requiring purchases of government land to be made only with gold and silver currency, or specie. A shortage of specie soon made loans harder to acquire, and the US economy suffered. When the speculative bubble burst in 1837, every bank in New York City stopped payment in specie. The Panic was followed by a nationwide depression involving record bank failures and unemployment levels. Who was blamed for the Panic? More… Discuss

Pope Francis and the drink of Peace: Yerba Mate | Look South


:

Ucranian immigrants cropping yerba mate in Tre...

Ucranian immigrants cropping yerba mate in Tres Capones, Misiones, Argentina. House of V. Hnatiuk (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Plantation in Misiones, Argentina.

Plantation in Misiones, Argentina. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

Pope Francis and the drink of Peace: Yerba Mate

 

June 21, 2013 · by Look South · in Argentina, South America, Tourism, Tours, Travel. ·

 

In the midst of political, religious, national, economic or personal problems, there is one thing that unites all Argentines: Mate.

Mate (pronounced máh-teh) despite what many people may say, is NOT in fact a herbal green tea although it is similar to one. Mate is a tea-like drink made from a green-colored jerboa (herb) that is a lot more robust than tea. For Argentines, mate is the very heart of life and is part of their tradition. It is drunk by the old and young, rich and poor, Peronists and Radicals, parents and children, during winter and summer

After years of conflict, Argentina’s President Cristina Kirchner greeted the new Pope Francis with a beautiful mate set – el “mate de la paz” – after which the pope asked her to stay for lunch with “unos mates” to follow”. Rocco Palmo noted on the occasion that: “A longstanding Vatican protocol forbids the Pope being seen consuming anything but the Eucharist”, but this did not stop him being photographed enjoying the drink.

via Pope Francis and the drink of Peace: Yerba Mate | Look South.

 

 

Pope Pope Beedict XVI receives Yerba Mate cup from ambassador of Uruguay to Vatican


Pope Beedict XVI receives Yerba Mate cup from ambassador of Uruguay to Vatican

Biography: Pepe Romero, World Renouned Classic Guitar Player


Pepe Romero

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaPepe Romero (born March 8, 1944 in Málaga, Spain) is a world-renowned classical and flamenco guitarist. He is particularly famous for his outstanding technique and colorful musical interpretations on the instrument.

Pepe Romero
Pepe Romero 2000.JPG

Pepe Romero in 2000
Background information
Born March 8, 1944 (age 71)
Málaga, Spain
Genres Classical music, flamenco
Occupation(s) Guitarist, arranger
Instruments Guitar
Years active fl. ca. 1959 – present
Labels Philips Records
Associated acts The Romero Guitar Quartet
Website www.peperomero.com
Notable instruments
Torres 1856

Biography

As a soloist Pepe Romero has appeared in the United States, Canada, Europe, China, and many countries around the world with the Toronto, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago, Houston, Pittsburgh, Boston, San Francisco and Dallas Symphony Orchestras, as well as with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the New York, Bogota and Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestras, the Boston Pops Orchestra, the Hong Kong Sinfonietta and the London Symphony Orchestra, the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, the Monte Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra, I Musici, the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, Philharmonia Hungarica, the Hungarian State Orchestra, the Spanish National Orchestra, the Spanish National Radio/Television Orchestra, L’Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, The New Moscow Chamber Orchestra, the Springfiled Orchestra, the Lausanne Chamber Orchestra, the American Sinfonietta and the Bournemouth Symphony. He has been a special guest at the festivals of Salzburg, Israel, Schleswig-Holstein, Menuhin, Osaka, Granada, Istanbul, Ravinia, Garden State, Hollywood Bowl, Blossom, Wolf Trap, Saratoga and Hong Kong.

Since his first recording (at the age of 15) he has recorded over 50 solo albums and 30 albums as part of the famed guitar quartet The Romeros. He has played for Presidents Carter and Nixon, the Queen of the Netherlands, the Prince of Wales and Pope John Paul II. He has numerous international recording awards to his credit and has received an Honorary Doctorate in Music from University of Victoria.

His contributions to the field of classical guitar have inspired a number of distinguished composers to write works specifically for him, including Joaquín Rodrigo, Federico Moreno Torroba, Rev. Francisco de Madina, Lorenzo Palomo, Michael Zearott, Enrique Diemecke, and Celedonio Romero.

Pepe Romero is the second son of Celedonio Romero, who was his only guitar teacher. His first professional appearance was in a shared concert with his father when Pepe was only seven years old. In 1957 Celedonio Romero left Franco‘s Spain for the United States with his family.

On February 11, 2000, King Juan Carlos I of Spain knighted Pepe Romero and his brothers, Celin and Ángel, into the Order of “Isabel la Catolica.” The official ceremony of this high honor took place at the USC Thornton School of Music, and included a gala performance by The Romeros with the Thornton Chamber Orchestra. He is currently Adjunct Professor of Classical Guitar at the Thornton School, where he was named “Distinguished Artist in Residence” in 2004.[1][2]

Although originally a classical guitarist, he is talented in Flamenco and a popular Flamenco performer. His most famous Flamenco-only album is called ¡Flamenco Fenómeno!

The Romero Guitar Quartet

The Romero Guitar Quartet

Related Stories:    HERE

https://euzicasa.wordpress.com/2015/05/08/pepe-romero-plays-fantasia-para-un-gentilhombre-by-joaquin-rodrigo-great-compositionsperformances/

Eating healthy is much more expensive than 10%— Fitness Motivation


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


SOMEWHERE IN TIME

SOMEWHERE IN TIME

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
May 8

1450   Jack Cade’s Rebellion–Kentishmen revolt against King Henry VI.
1541   Hernando de Soto discovers the Mississippi River which he calls Rio de Espiritu Santo.
1559   An act of supremacy defines Queen Elizabeth I as the supreme governor of the church of England.
1794   The United States Post Office is established.
1846   The first major battle of the Mexican War is fought at Palo Alto, Texas.
1862   General ‘Stonewall’ Jackson repulses the Federals at the Battle of McDowell, in the Shenendoah Valley.
1864   Union troops arrive at Spotsylvania Court House to find the Confederates waiting for them.
1886   Atlanta pharmacist John Pemberton invents Coca Cola.
1895   China cedes Taiwan to Japan under Treaty of Shimonoseki.
1904   U.S. Marines land in Tangier, North Africa, to protect the Belgian legation.
1919   The first transatlantic flight by a navy seaplane takes-off.
1933   Hahatma Gandhi begins a hunger strike to protest British oppression in India.
1940   German commandos in Dutch uniforms cross the Dutch border to hold bridges for the advancing German army.
1942   The Battle of the Coral Sea between the Japanese Navy and the U.S. Navy ends.
1945   The final surrender of German forces is celebrated as VE (Victory Europe) day.
1952   Allied fighter-bombers stage the largest raid of the war on North Korea.
1958   President Eisenhower orders the National Guard out of Little Rock as Ernest Green becomes the first black to graduate from an Arkansas public school.
1967   Boxer Muhammad Ali is indicted for refusing induction in U.S. Army.
1984   The Soviet Union announces it will not participate in Summer Olympics planned for Los Angeles.
1995   Jacques Chirac is elected president of France.
Born on May 8
1668   Alain Rene Lesage, French writer (The Adventures of Gil Blas, Turcaret).
1753   Miguel Hidalgo, Mexican nationalist.
1828   Jean Henri Dunant, Swiss philanthropist, founder of the Red Cross and YMCA, first recipient (jointly) of the Nobel Peace Prize.
1829   Louis Moreau Gottschalk, American pianist.
1884   Harry S. Truman, 33rd President of the United States (1945-1953).
1895   Edmund Wilson, American critic and essayist.
1906   Roberto Rossellini, Italian film director.
1910   Mary Lou Williams, jazz pianist and composer.
1920   Sloan Wilson, American author (The man in the Gray Flannel Suit, A Summer Place).
1928   Theodore Sorenson, advisor to John F. Kennedy.
1930   Gary Snyder, beat poet.
1937   Thomas Pynchon, novelist (Gravity’s Rainbow).
1940   Peter Benchley, novelist (Jaws, The Deep).
1952   Beth Henley, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright (Crimes of the Heart).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.JwQmRBg9.dpuf

this day in the yesteryear: The Hard Hat Riot (1970)


The Hard Hat Riot (1970)

Four days after four students were shot and killed while protesting the Vietnam War at Kent State University in Ohio, several hundred anti-war protesters gathered near New York City Hall to hold a memorial for the shooting victims and protest the war. At around noon, 200 construction workers attacked the approximately 1,000 protesters—most of whom were high school and college students—resulting in dozens of injuries and six arrests. Who organized the construction workers in the counter-protest? More… Discuss

word: empirical


empirical

Definition: (adjective) Relying on or derived from observation or experiment.
Synonyms: objective
Usage: Scientists insist on empirical results, not mere speculation, to support their theories. Discuss.

How to Prepare Gaucho Mate (powdery yerba mate)


image
How to Prepare Gaucho Mate (powdery yerba mate)

“Ruhe sanft, mein holdes Leben” Lucia Popp , Vienna Haydn Orchestra, István Kertész (1972 Decca Music Group Limited) , A Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus


Mozart: Zaide, K.344 / Act 1 – “Ruhe sanft, mein holdes

Leben”

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


SOMEWHERE IN TIME

SOMEWHERE IN TIME

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
May 7

558   The dome of the church of St. Sophia in Constantinople collapses. Its immediate rebuilding is ordered by Justinian.
1274   The Second Council of Lyons opens in France to regulate the election of the pope.
1429   Joan of Arc breaks the English siege of Orleans.
1525   The German peasants’ revolt is crushed by the ruling class and church.
1763   Indian chief Pontiac begins his attack on a British fort in present-day Detroit, Michigan.
1800   Congress divides the Northwest Territory into two parts. The western part will becomes the Indiana Territory and the eastern section remains the Northwest Territory.
1824   Beethoven’s “Ninth Symphony” premiers in Vienna.
1847   The American Medical Association is formed in Philadelphia.
1862   Confederate troops strike Union troops at the Battle of Eltham’s Landing in Virginia.
1864   The Battle of Wilderness ends with heavy losses to both sides.
1877   Indian chief Sitting Bull enters Canada with a trail of Indians after the Battle of Little Big Horn.
1915   The German submarine U-20 torpedoes the passenger ship Lusitiania, sinking her in 21 minutes with 1,978 people on board.
1937   The German Condor Legion arrives in Spain to assist Fransico Franco’s forces.
1942   In the Battle of the Coral Sea, Japanese and American navies attack each other with carrier-launched warplanes. It is the first time in the history of naval warfare where two fleets fought without seeing each other.Two crucial battles in 1942 marked the turning point of the war in the Pacific.
1943   The last major German strongholds in North Africa–Tunis and Bizerte–fall to Allied forces.
1945   Germany signs an unconditional surrender, effectively ending World War II in Europe.
1952   In Korea, Communist POWs at Koje-do riot against their American captors.
1954   French troops surrender to the Vietminh at Dien Bien Phu.
1958   Howard Johnson sets an aircraft altitude record in F-104.
1960   Leonid Brezhnev becomes president of the Soviet Union.
Born on May 7
1812   Robert Browning, English poet.
1833   Johannes Brahms, German composer.
1840   Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky, Russian composer.
1870   Marcus Loew, film executive, consolidated studios to create MGM.
1892   Josip Broz [Tito], leader of Yugoslavia during after World War II.
1892   Archibald MacLeish, American poet and statesman.
1901   Gary Cooper, film actor (High Noon, Friendly Persuasion).
1909   Edwin Herbert Land, inventor of the Poloroid Land Camera.
1919   Eva (Evita) Perón, first lady of Argentina.
1932   Jenny Joseph, English poet and novelist (The Thinking Heart, The Inland Sea).
1943   Peter Carey, Australian writer (Illywhacker, Oscar and Lucinda).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.nPmBqJGM.dpuf

image of the day: V-E Day


V-E Day

After five years, World War II in Europe ended on May 7, 1945, when Colonel General Alfred Jodl, the last chief of staff of the German Army, signed the unconditional surrender at General Dwight D. Eisenhower‘s headquarters at Rheims, France. The next morning, President Harry S. Truman‘s radio announcement of V-E Day touched off celebrations in Allied areas throughout the world. Happy Stars and Stripes staffers in London are shown here reading copies of the surrender announcement as they roll off the presses. – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.gX5PNcj2.dpuf

Saint of the Day for Thursday, May 7th, 2015: St. Rose Venerini


Image of St. Rose Venerini

St. Rose Venerini

Blessed Rose was born at Viterbo in 1656, the daughter of Godfrey Venerini, a physician. Upon the death of a young man who had been paying court to her, she entered a convent, but after a few months … continue reading

Rose of Viterbo

Rose of Viterbo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

More Saints of the Day

today’s holiday: Festa di San Nicola


Festa di San Nicola

The Festa di San Nicola (Festival of St. Nicholas) is celebrated in Italy on the anniversary of the transfer of the saint’s relics by a group of 11th-century sailors from Bari. Thousands of pilgrims come to the Basilica of San Nicola in Bari, Puglia, to worship at the saint’s tomb and to ask for his help. There is a procession on this day in which a group of Barese sailors take the saint’s image down to the water, where it is placed on a flower-decked boat and taken out to sea. At night the statue is returned to its place of honor on the altar of San Nicola’s crypt. More… Discuss

today’s birthday Olympe de Gouges (1748)


Olympe de Gouges (1748)

Born Marie Gouze, de Gouges was a French author whose feminist writings during the French Revolution demanded the same rights for French women that French men were demanding. In 1791, alarmed that the new constitution did not address woman’s suffrage, she wrote Declaration of the Rights of Woman and the Female Citizen, challenging the practice of male authority and the notion of male-female inequality. Why was she executed by guillotine during the Reign of Terror? More… Discuss

Pope John Paul II Visits Mosque (2001)


Pope John Paul II Visits Mosque (2001)

When Pope John Paul II visited Syria’s Umayyad Mosque, where the head of John the Baptist—a holy figure in both Christianity and Islam—is said to be interred, he became the first Catholic Pope to enter and pray in an Islamic mosque. The address he delivered there, promoting peace between Muslims and Christians, reflected his ongoing ecumenical efforts, which included meeting with religious leaders from other faiths and denominations. While in Syria, the pope aroused controversy by kissing what? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Karl Marx (1818)


Karl Marx (1818)

Though largely ignored during his lifetime, Marx was perhaps one of the most influential figures in history. His ideas, particularly those he expounded in his two most notable works, The Communist Manifesto and Das Kapital, have become the core intellectual tradition for communism and socialism, and many scholars consider him the founder of economic history and sociology. His philosophy significantly influenced communist thinking for the next century. What anarchist was his enemy? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Greenery Day


Greenery Day

This day formerly observed the birthday of Emperor Hirohito of Japan (1901-1989), who was the world’s longest ruling monarch. Today this day is celebrated as Greenery Day (Midori-no-Hi) with parades featuring elaborate floats, paper lanterns, traditional Japanese costumes, and fireworks. People also mark the day by planting trees and with other activities centered around the appreciation of nature. Greenery Day is a part of Golden Week, which also includes Japan Constitution Memorial Day (May 3) and Kodomo-no-Hi (Children’s Day, May 5). More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Haymarket Riot (1886)


English: Placard protesting police brutality a...

English: Placard protesting police brutality at a Shell to Sea protest, Bellanaboy, September 2007 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Haymarket Riot (1886)

This violent confrontation between Chicago police and labor protesters, which dramatized the labor movement’s struggle for recognition, began when a bomb was thrown into the police ranks at a gathering of radical unionists protesting police brutality against strikers. With seven officers dead and 60 wounded, the police opened fire on the crowd. Seven anarchist leaders were later sentenced to death. Why is their trial regarded as one of the most serious miscarriages of justice in US history? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Golda Meir (1898)


Golda Meir (1898)

Meir was Israel‘s first female prime minister and the third woman in the world to hold such an office, after Sirimavo Bandaranaike of Sri Lanka and Indira Gandhi of India. A signer of Israel’s declaration of independence in 1948, she served in the fledgling nation’s parliament and held posts as minister of labor and foreign minister before becoming Israel’s fourth prime minister in 1969. During her tenure, she sought to ease tensions in the region through diplomacy. Why did she resign in 1974? More… Discuss

The Puerto Rican Parrot


The Puerto Rican Parrot

The Puerto Rican Parrot is the only remaining native parrot in US territory and one of the 10 most endangered bird species in the world. It has green feathers with black edges, a red forehead, and white ovals around the eyes. It was abundant at the time of Columbus’ arrival, but its numbers declined with the clearing of Puerto Rico’s virgin forests to make way for agricultural, mainly sugar cane, production. In 1975, the population reached an absolute low of how many individuals? More… Discuss

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
May 1

408   Theodosius II succeeds to the throne of Constantinople.
1308   King Albert is murdered by his nephew John, because he refused his share of the Habsburg lands.
1486   Christopher Columbus convinces Queen Isabella to fund expedition to the West Indies.
1805   The state of Virginia passes a law requiring all freed slaves to leave the state, or risk either imprisonment or deportation.
1863   The Battle of Chancellorsville begins as Union Gen. Joe Hooker starts his three-pronged attack against Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.
1867   Reconstruction in the South begins with black voter registration.
1877   President Ruthoford B. Hayes withdraws all Federal troops from the South, ending Reconstruction.
1898   The U.S. Navy under Dewey defeats the Spanish fleet at the Battle of Manila Bay in the Philippines.
1915   The luxury liner Lusitania leaves New York Harbor for a voyage to Europe.
1927   Adolf Hitler holds his first Nazi meeting in Berlin.
1931   The Empire State Building opens in New York.
1934   The Philippine legislature accepts a U.S. proposal for independence.
1937   President Franklin Roosevelt signs an act of neutrality, keeping the United States out of World War II.
1941   The film Citizen Kane–directed and starring Orson Welles–opens in New York.
1944   The Messerschmitt Me 262, the first combat jet, makes its first flight.
1945   Martin Bormann, private secretary to Adolf Hitler, escapes the Fuehrerbunker as the Red Army advances on Berlin.
1948   North Korea is established.
1950   Gwendolyn Brooks becomes the first African American to win the Pulitzer Prize for her book of poetry called Annie Allen.
1960   Francis Gary Powers’ U-2 spy plane is shot down over Russia.
1961   Fidel Castro announces there will be no more elections in Cuba.
1968   In the second day of battle, U.S. Marines, with the support of naval fire, continue their attack on a North Vietnamese Division at Dai Do.
1970   Students from Kent State University riot in downtown Kent, Ohio, in protest of the American invasion of Cambodia.
1986   The Tass News Agency reports the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.
2011   Osama Bin Laden is killed in Abbottabad Pakistan by US Navy SEALS in Operation Neptune Spear.
Born on May 1
1493   Phillippus Paracelsus, physician and alchemist.
1764   Benjamin Henry Latrobe, architect of the U.S. Capitol.
1769   Arthur Wellsley, Duke of Wellington.
1830   Mother (Mary Harris) Jones, reformer and labor organizer.
1839   Louis-Maire-Hilaire Bernigaud, French chemist, inventor of rayon.
1878   James Graham, inventor of the first naval aircraft-carrying ship and first man to film a total eclipse of the Sun.
1896   Mark Clark, American general during World War II.
1909   Kate Smith, singer.
1916   Glenn Ford, actor (The Blackboard Jungle).
1923   Joseph Heller, American author (Catch 22).
1924   Terry Southern, novelist and screenwriter (Dr. Strangelove, Easy Rider).
1940   Bobbie Ann Mason, American writer (Shiloh and Other Stories, In Country).

this day in the yesteryear: Hitler Commits Suicide (1945)


Hitler Commits Suicide (1945)

In the final days of World War II, as the Red Army of the Soviet Union was closing in on his underground bunker in Berlin, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler committed suicide by shooting himself while simultaneously biting into a cyanide capsule. Hitler’s body and that of Eva Braun—his mistress whom he had wed the day before—were then placed in a bomb crater, doused with gasoline, and set on fire by German officials. How did Soviet soldiers identify Hitler’s remains? More… Discuss

schism


 

English: Steeple of St. James Catholic Church ...

English: Steeple of St. James Catholic Church in Chicago, USA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

schism

 

Definition: (noun) A separation or division into factions.
Synonyms: discord, split
Usage: Heretics were burned for attempting to create a schism in the Catholic Church. Discuss.

 

Murrow vs. McCarthy


Murrow vs. McCarthy

20th April, 1841: First detective story (Edgar Allen Poe’s “Murders in Rue Morgue”) is published. — ✍ Bibliophilia (@Libroantiguo)


this pressed for you: read on! Flash – Will latest migrant drama prod Europe into action? – France 24


© Eurokinissi/AFP / by Christian Spillmann | Local residents and rescue workers try to help migrants after their boat sank off the island of Rhodes, Greece, on April 20, 2015

20 April 2015 – 22H05

Will latest migrant drama prod Europe into action?

BRUSSELS (AFP) –

EU nations have long had the recipes for managing migrant flows and sharing out the burden of illegal migration but have lacked the political will for action despite multiple dramas in the Mediterranean, critics say.

“It’s shameful of Europe,” a high-ranking EU official told AFP after a boat carrying more than 700 people — perhaps as many as 1,000 — capsized off Libya days after a series of similar accidents sparked international outrage.

The European Union’s 28 members states had “no more excuses” to avoid action, warned the bloc’s foreign affairs chief Federica Mogherini.

Amid the anger caused by the Lampedusa disaster of late 2013, in which 366 people drowned off Italy while seeking to reach Europe’s shores, the EU finessed plans to deal with the problem.

The action plan outlined at the time included improving the legal means of migration, combatting people-smugglers, beefing up the cash made available to Frontex, the EU’s frontier control agency, and rewriting the rules on dealing with migrant and refugee arrivals.

There has been no real follow-up however.

“The latest tragedies on the Mediterranean show how urgent it is to agree a share-out of responsibility,” said Cecilia Malmstroem, the EU’s former migration commissioner.

But at a summit on the issue in December 2013, EU leaders merely agreed to “prioritise efforts to stop departures” and show “appropriate solidarity” on dealing with new migrant arrivals.

The EU’s current migrant and refugee regime is set out in what is known as the Dublin II accords. They require that the country of first arrival — most often Italy recently – process migrants as well as asylum requests and be responsible for expelling those whose applications have been rejected.

A European Commission proposal to review the rule in the interests of better burden-sharing was flatly rejected by 24 of the EU’s 28 member states.

Only Italy, Greece, Cyprus and Malta — on the frontline of the migrant tide — backed the idea.

Malmstroem said European politicians had allowed populist and xenophobic movements to dictate policy and put the emphasis on repatriation.

– ‘Something has to change’ –

Now, public anger and shock over the steadily mounting death toll at sea may force a change.

“These are people like you and me — they’re not cockroaches,” thundered The Times of London, referring to controversial remarks made by a British newspaper columnist that “gunships” should be used on migrant boats to turn them back.

Malmstroem’s successor, Greece’s Dimitris Avramopoulos, is set to introduce a new approach to the problem in May.

Among his initiatives are greater funding for Frontex’s Triton operation monitoring the Mediterranean, new European programmes and facilities to handle incoming migrants, and legal and security rules “for people fleeing conflicts.”

Central to Avramopoulos’ push is his conviction that “something has to change” in the logic of the Dublin II accord, which leaves each country to deal with its individual share of the bloc’s immigration problem, limiting collective measures.

At a March 12 meeting, EU interior ministers looked at ways of stopping would-be migrants from leaving home.

Among these was setting up centres to examine immigration and asylum requests at major departure points in Africa to help stop people from setting out in rickety boats for a perilous journey across the Mediterranean sea.

“The only way to truly change the reality is to address the situation at its roots,” a Commission statement read.

Italy suspended its Mare Nostrum search-and-rescue operation late last year in protest over its rising cost and it was replaced by a smaller and much more restricted EU-led mission called Triton.

The recent flood of migrants and the growing loss of life have put Triton in the spotlight, with EU diplomatic sources saying Monday there was an emerging consensus that it had to get more resources to cope with the growing problem.

EU leaders will hold an emergency summit on the issue on Thursday and will be under intense pressure to come up with concrete proposals.

EU foreign and interior ministers meeting on Monday came up with a 10-point plan for action to be submitted to the leaders at the summit.

by Christian Spillmann

? 2015 AFP

News videos : UK elections – Miliband wins debate as PM Cameron absent

via Flash – Will latest migrant drama prod Europe into action? – France 24.

related Readings:  HERE

1915 Armenian Massacre Now Called a Genocide by Germany


1915 Armenian Massacre Now Called a Genocide by Germany  Added by Alex Lemieux on April 20, 2015.  Saved under Breaking News!, Germany, World  Tags: 1915 Armenian Massacre  1915 Armenian Massacre

1915 Armenian Massacre Now Called a Genocide by Germany Added by Alex Lemieux on April 20, 2015. Saved under Breaking News!, Germany, World Tags: 1915 Armenian Massacre 1915 Armenian Massacre

1915 Armenian Massacre Now Called a Genocide by Germany

Added by Alex Lemieux on April 20, 2015.

Saved under Breaking News!, Germany, World

Tags: 1915 Armenian Massacre

1915 Armenian Massacre

Germany has now reversed its stance to use the term “genocide” to describe the 1915 Armenian massacre when around 1.5 million Armenians were slaughtered by Ottoman Turkish forces. The major reversal is crucial due to the fact that Germany is Turkey’s top European Union trading partner. Germany comes after France, Pope Francis, and the European parliament to condemn the violence.

Germany has resisted using the term of genocide even though other European nations have. Though, the government has come under scrutiny from officials to use the word in a resolution. Steffen Seibert, a spokesman for Chancellor Angela Merkel, stated Germany would support a parliamentary resolution, declaring the 1915 Armenian massacre an example of genocide.

Turkey’s government currently denies that the slaughters constituted genocide. Officials stated there was no organized nation campaign to kill off Armenians and no such other orders from the Ottoman Empire. The word Genocide has not been used by any other nations to avoid upsetting Turkey and trading negotiations.

Originally, the German government refused to use the term due to some concerns of the Herero massacres done in 1904 and 1905 by German forces. This lead to reparation demands in what is now Namibia.

By Alex Lemieux

Source:

The Daily Mail

Photo by Luke Ma – Flickr License

via 1915 Armenian Massacre Now Called a Genocide by Germany.

More>>>>>>> HERE <<<<<<<<<

picture of the day: President James Garfield and Daughter



President James Garfield & Daughter

President James Garfield and his daughter are captured on film.

Photo: Brady-Handy Photograph Collection, Library of Congress.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.NcmnT3vD.dpuf

quotation: Sometimes a scream is better than a thesis. Ralph Waldo Emerson (listening to two audiobooks here at EUZICASA)


Sometimes a scream is better than a thesis.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

 

Free Audiobook: Ralph Waldo Emerson Self Reliance

today’s birthday: Glenn Seaborg (1912)


Glenn Seaborg (1912)

In 1940, American chemist Glenn Seaborg and his colleagues discovered plutonium. He soon joined the Manhattan Project and was instrumental in the development of the atomic bomb, which he unsuccessfully pressed President Truman not to use on civilian targets. In 1951, he and Edwin McMillan shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their work on transuranium elements. During his lifetime, Seaborg held dozens of patents—among them the only patents ever issued for what? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: The World’s First Space Station Is Launched (1971)


The World’s First Space Station Is Launched (1971)

The world’s first space station, the Soviet Salyut 1, was launched in 1971. The cosmonauts aboard the Soyuz 11 spacecraft were the first to enter, remaining aboard for 22 days. By 1982, five more Salyut space stations had been orbited successfully, two of them for military purposes. By rotating the crews regularly, the Soviets were able to staff the stations for extended periods. All the Salyut space stations decayed and are no longer in orbit. What happened to Salyut 1? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Emancipation Day (Washington, D.C.)


Emancipation Day (Washington, D.C.)

In Washington, DC, April 16th is celebrated as Emancipation Day, commemorating the day in 1862 when President Abraham Lincoln signed into law the District of Columbia Emancipation Act, nine months prior to the Emancipation Proclamation. More than 3,000 slaves were freed under this agreement. Since 2005, the date has been a legal holiday in the District. Events are scheduled throughout the preceding week, and the observance culminates on the 16th in a day of festivities and entertainment, beginning with a parade down Pennsylvania Avenue in the morning. More… Discuss

Fighting Boko Haram: Chad aims to ‘destroy’ militant group | euronews, world news


Luis Carballo will be online to discuss his experiences in Chad on Thursday at 15:00 CET. He’ll answer your questions in English, Spanish or French so please post them in the live blog at the foot of this page, email them to askluis@scribblelive.com or Tweet them using the hashtag #askeuronewsluis. You can follow Luis on Twitter @granangular.

For more than a decade, the Islamist group Boko Haram had a limited strategy: to create an Islamic caliphate in northern Nigeria. But now it has spread its terror campaign to neighbouring countries as well.

Chad, Niger and Cameroon have responded with a military alliance which, since January, has been helping the Abuja government.

“What these children have seen, you wouldn’t wish it on your worst enemy.”

In March, Boko Haram signed a deal with ISIL, or the self proclaimed Islamic State. This turned the conflict into an international one, switching on red lights across the region and accelerating a joint offensive.

via Fighting Boko Haram: Chad aims to ‘destroy’ militant group | euronews, world news.

>>>>>>RELATED READING<<<<<<<

>>>>>>RELATED READING<<<<<<<

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

February 14

Happy Valentine’s Day!Today is St. Valentine’s Day, the feast day of two Christian martyrs named Valentine: one a priest and physician, the other the Bishop of Terni. Both are purported to have been beheaded on this day. The custom of sending handmade ‘valentines’ to one’s beloved became popular during the 17th century and was first commercialized in the United States in the 1840s.

 

1349   2,000 Jews are burned at the stake in Strasbourg, Germany.
1400   The deposed Richard II is murdered in Pontefract Castle in Yorkshire.
1549   Maximilian II, brother of the Emperor Charles V, is recognized as the future king of Bohemia.
1779   American Loyalists are defeated by Patriots at Kettle Creek, Ga.
1797   The Spanish fleet is destroyed by the British under Admiral Jervis (with Nelson in support) at the battle of Cape St. Vincent, off Portugal.
1848   James Polk becomes the first U.S. President to be photographed in office by Matthew Brady.
1859   Oregon is admitted as the thirty-third state.
1870   Esther Morris becomes the world’s first female justice of the peace.
1876   Rival inventors Elisha Gray and Alexander Graham Bell both apply for patents for the telephone.
1900   General Roberts invades South Africa’s Orange Free State with 20,000 British troops.
1904   The “Missouri Kid” is captured in Kansas.
1912   Arizona becomes the 48th state in the Union.
1915   Kaiser Wilhelm II invites the U.S. Ambassador to Berlin in order to confer on the war.
1918   Warsaw demonstrators protest the transfer of Polish territory to the Ukraine.
1920   The League of Women Voters is formed in Chicago in celebration of the imminent ratification of the 19th Amendment, giving women the right to vote.
1924   Thomas Watson founds International Business Machines Corp.
1929   Chicago gang war between Al Capone and George “Bugs” Moran culminates with several Moran confederates being gunned down in the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre.
1939   Germany launches the battleship Bismark.
1940   Britain announces that all merchant ships will be armed.
1942   Japanese paratroopers attack Sumatra. Aidan MacCarthy‘s RAF unit flew to Palembang, in eastern Sumatra, where 30 Royal Australian Air Force Lockheed A-28 Hudson bombers were waiting.
1945   800 Allied aircraft firebomb the German city of Dresden. Smaller followup bombing raids last until April with a total death toll of between 35,000 to 130,000 civillians.
1945   The siege of Budapest ends as the Soviets take the city. Only 785 German and Hungarian soldiers managed to escape.
1949   The United States charges the Soviet Union with interning up to 14 million in labor camps.
1955   A Jewish couple loses their fight to adopt Catholic twins as the U.S. Supreme Court refuses to rule on state law.
1957   The Georgia state senate outlaws interracial athletics.
1965   Malcolm X’s home is firebombed. No injuries are reported.
1971   Moscow publicizes a new five-year plan geared to expanding consumer production.
1973   The United States and Hanoi set up a group to channel reconstruction aid directly to Hanoi.
1979   Armed guerrillas attack the U.S. embassy in Tehran.
1985   Vietnamese troops surround the main Khmer Rouge base at Phnom Malai.
1989   Iranian leader Ayatollah Ruholla Khomeini charges that Salman Rushdie’s novel, The Satanic Verses, is blasphemous and issues an edict (fatwa) calling on Muslims to kill Rushdie.
Born on February 14
1760   Richard Allen, first black ordained by a Methodist-Episcopal church.
1817   Frederick Douglass, slave, and later, activist and author.
1819   Christopher Latham Sholes, inventor of the first practical typewriter.
1845   Quinton Hogg, English philanthropist.
1859   George Washington Gale Ferris, inventor of the Ferris Wheel.
1894   Jack Benny, comedian, radio and television performer…and violinist.
1894   Mary Lucinda Cardwell Dawson, founded the National Negro Opera Company (NNOC) and was appointed to President John F. Kennedy’s National Committee on Music.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.8Ow54pqd.dpuf

today’s image: Valentine’s Day (Image: Courtesy of My Scrap Album)



Valentine’s Day
Valentine’s Day probably has its origins in the Roman feast of Lupercalia, which was held on February 15. One of the traditions associated with this feast was young men drawing the names of young women whom they would court during the following year–a custom that may have grown into the giving of valentine’s cards. Another legend associated with Valentine’s Day was the martyrdom of the Christian priest St. Valentine on February 14. The Roman emperor believed that men would remain soldiers longer if they were not married, but Valentine earned the wrath of the emperor by secretly marrying young couples. The first American publisher of valentines was printer and artist Esther Howland, who sold elaborate handmade cards for as much as $35 at the end of the 19th century. Complex and beautiful machine-made cards brought the custom of valentine exchanging within the reach of many Americans.

Image: Courtesy of My Scrap Album

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.nQwYsmdF.dpuf