Tag Archives: University of California Davis

Video Calls Benefit Some Hospitalized Children


Video Calls Benefit Some Hospitalized Children

“Virtual visits” with loved ones help reduce stress for some—but not all—hospitalized children. Having access to video chat technology reduced stress levels for kids who lived an average of 35 miles from the hospital and were only hospitalized for about five days. However, pediatric patients whose hospital stays were longer or whose families lived farther away saw no real stress-reducing benefit from the technology. More… Discuss

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UC Davis MIND Institute Study Finds Association Between Maternal Exposure to Agricultural Pesticides, Autism in Offspring



UC Davis MIND Institute Study Finds Association Between Maternal Exposure to Agricultural Pesticides, Autism in Offspring
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mindinstitute.ucdavis.edu

Source: http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
The work was supported by grants from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences R01-ES015359, P01-ES011269 and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants R833292 and 829338. The study is available free of charge at:  http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1307044/

Paramilitary Policing From Seattle to Occupy Wall Street (from The Nation)


Paramilitary Policing From Seattle to Occupy Wall Street (from The Nation)
Paramilitary Policing From Seattle to Occupy Wall Street (from The Nation) (click here to read the very imortant article)

They came from all over, tens of thousands of demonstrators from around the world, protesting the economic and moral pitfalls of globalization. Our mission as members of the Seattle Police Department? To safeguard people and property—in that order. Things went well the first day. We were praised for our friendliness and restraint—though some politicians were apoplectic at our refusal to make mass arrests for the actions of a few.

About the Author

Norm Stamper
Norm Stamper was chief of the Seattle Police Department during the WTO protests in 1999. He is the author of Breaking…
 

Then came day two. Early in the morning, large contingents of demonstrators began to converge at a key downtown intersection. They sat down and refused to budge. Their numbers grew. A labor march would soon add additional thousands to the mix.

“We have to clear the intersection,” said the field commander. “We have to clear the intersection,” the operations commander agreed, from his bunker in the Public Safety Building. Standing alone on the edge of the crowd, I, the chief of police, said to myself, “We have to clear the intersection.”

Why?

Because of all the what-ifs. What if a fire breaks out in the Sheraton across the street? What if a woman goes into labor on the seventeenth floor of the hotel? What if a heart patient goes into cardiac arrest in the high-rise on the corner? What if there’s a stabbing, a shooting, a serious-injury traffic accident? How would an aid car, fire engine or police cruiser get through that sea of people? The cop in me supported the decision to clear the intersection. But the chief in me should have vetoed it. And he certainly should have forbidden the indiscriminate use of tear gas to accomplish it, no matter how many warnings we barked through the bullhorn.

(From: http://www.thenation.com/article/164501/paramilitary-policing-seattle-occupy-wall-street)

This article was written and published before the peeper spray dehumanizing action at UC DAVIS, and it only support this experience retired police chief take on the reality of the mindset of the authorities regarding the social, not politically associated movement for justice and peace!

Former Seattle Police Chief Norm Stamper on Paramilitary Policing From WTO to Occupy Wall Street


Former Seattle Police Chief Norm Stamper on Paramilitary Policing From WTO to Occupy Wall Street
Former Seattle Police Chief Norm Stamper on Paramilitary Policing From WTO to Occupy Wall Street (click here to find out more about this topic)

It is interesting to revisit, the statements made by the official in charge of riot suppression, in the light of the US Davis campus abuse of children rights to petition for social, political and economical justice in the United States, rights not only violated, but to which there are no dialogue, concessions, discussion, as if we, the citizens are not represented by anybody. The actions of the Campus police of the Uc Davis, is clear declaration of the mindset of the officials regarding the petition for justice.

Campus Police Chief Put on Leave in Pepper Spray Incident (From The New York Times)


Things are only as important as the importance we’re giving them!

Campus Police Chief Put on Leave in Pepper Spray Incident (From The New York Times)
Campus Police Chief Put on Leave in Pepper Spray Incident (From The New York Times) (click here to read more about this outrageous treatment of out young generation)

The University of California was established in 1868, and moved its first campus to Berkeley in 1873. The San Francisco and Los Angeles campuses followed in 1873 and 1919, respectively. The original UCPD department at Berkeley was founded after World War I. In September 1947, the Regents of the University of California established UCPD as a state law-enforcement agency.

 Authority and jurisdiction

The UCPD is one of several police agencies in California having a state-wide jurisdiction and authority (other examples include the California Highway Patrol, the California State University Police Department, and the California Department of Fish and Game). UCPD officers, like most California police officers, are empowered by section 830.2(b) of the California Penal Code, giving them authority as duly sworn peace officers throughout the state of California.[1] As specified by Section 92600 of the California Education Code, their primary jurisdiction extends to the campuses and properties owned by the Regents of the University of California, as well as lands within a one-mile (1.6 km) radius of those campuses.[2]

Organization

The department consists of ten departments (one for each UC campus),[3] each led by its own chief of police. Unlike other police departments in the state, there is no single chief of the UCPD, however one chief is selected as the department’s central coordinator (currently Chief Pamela E. Roskowski of UCSF). The coordinator is responsible for compiling crime statistics from each campus, as required by the Clery Act, and for ensuring that the various departments are operating within the UCPD’s mission. However, the coordinator does not dictate the day-to-day operations of the department, and each department sets its own Standard Operating Policies.
(Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_California_Police_Department)

Name
Annette Spicuzza
Office
Chief of Police, UC Davis Police Department
Term
2005-present

Annette M. Spicuzza, who took office on May 16, 2005, is the first woman to be permanently appointed to Chief of the UC Davis Police Department. Prior to her employment at UC Davis, she was assistant police chief at the University of Washington in Seattle.

She is now infamous for blatantly lying to media about the circumstances surrounding the police brutality against peaceful protesters on the UC Davis Campus on November 18, 2011. She was placed on administrative leave on Monday, November 21, 2011 pending a review of this incident.
(Source: http://daviswiki.org/Annette_Spicuzza)

UC-Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi Denies Resignation, Says the ‘University Needs Me’


UC-Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi Denies Resignation, Says the 'University Needs Me'
UC-Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi Denies Resignation, Says the ‘University Needs Me’ (click to view this outrageos response)

Katehi was born in Athens and grew up on Salamis Island in Greece. She received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, in 1977. She came to the United States in 1979, then earned a master’s degree and doctorate in electrical engineering at the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California, Los Angeles, in 1981 and 1984, respectively.[2]

Her work in electronic circuit design has led to numerous national and international awards both as a technical leader and educator, 19 U.S. patents, and an additional five U.S. patent applications. She is the author or co-author of 10 book chapters and about 650 refereed publications in journals and symposia proceedings.[3] A member of the National Academy of Engineering, she chaired until 2010 the President’s Committee for the National Medal of Science and the Secretary of Commerce’s committee for the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. She is a fellow and board member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of other national boards and committees.[4] In April 2011, Katehi was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[5]

Before coming to UC Davis, Katehi served as provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; the John A. Edwardson Dean of Engineering and professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University; and associate dean for academic affairs and graduate education in the College of Engineering and professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan.

Katehi has mentored more than 70 postdoctoral fellows, doctoral and master’s students in electrical and computer engineering. Twenty-two of the 44 doctoral students who graduated under her supervision have become faculty members at research universities in the United States and abroad.

University of California, Davis

Katehi was appointed Chancellor by the University of California Board of Regentson May 7, 2009, effective August 17, 2009. She holds… (source:

Katehi was born in Athens and grew up on Salamis Island in Greece. She received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, in 1977. She came to the United States in 1979, then earned a master’s degree and doctorate in electrical engineering at the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California, Los Angeles, in 1981 and 1984, respectively.[2]

Her work in electronic circuit design has led to numerous national and international awards both as a technical leader and educator, 19 U.S. patents, and an additional five U.S. patent applications. She is the author or co-author of 10 book chapters and about 650 refereed publications in journals and symposia proceedings.[3] A member of the National Academy of Engineering, she chaired until 2010 the President’s Committee for the National Medal of Science and the Secretary of Commerce’s committee for the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. She is a fellow and board member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of other national boards and committees.[4] In April 2011, Katehi was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[5]

Before coming to UC Davis, Katehi served as provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; the John A. Edwardson Dean of Engineering and professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University; and associate dean for academic affairs and graduate education in the College of Engineering and professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan.

Katehi has mentored more than 70 postdoctoral fellows, doctoral and master’s students in electrical and computer engineering. Twenty-two of the 44 doctoral students who graduated under her supervision have become faculty members at research universities in the United States and abroad.

University of California, Davis

Katehi was appointed Chancellor by the University of California Board of Regentson May 7, 2009, effective August 17, 2009. She holds… (

Katehi was born in Athens and grew up on Salamis Island in Greece. She received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, in 1977. She came to the United States in 1979, then earned a master’s degree and doctorate in electrical engineering at the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California, Los Angeles, in 1981 and 1984, respectively.[2]

Her work in electronic circuit design has led to numerous national and international awards both as a technical leader and educator, 19 U.S. patents, and an additional five U.S. patent applications. She is the author or co-author of 10 book chapters and about 650 refereed publications in journals and symposia proceedings.[3] A member of the National Academy of Engineering, she chaired until 2010 the President’s Committee for the National Medal of Science and the Secretary of Commerce’s committee for the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. She is a fellow and board member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of other national boards and committees.[4] In April 2011, Katehi was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[5]

Before coming to UC Davis, Katehi served as provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; the John A. Edwardson Dean of Engineering and professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University; and associate dean for academic affairs and graduate education in the College of Engineering and professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan.

Katehi has mentored more than 70 postdoctoral fellows, doctoral and master’s students in electrical and computer engineering. Twenty-two of the 44 doctoral students who graduated under her supervision have become faculty members at research universities in the United States and abroad.

University of California, Davis

Katehi was appointed Chancellor by the University of California Board of Regents on May 7, 2009, effective August 17, 2009. She holds…

(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linda_P.B._Katehi)

UC Davis will probe use of pepper-spray on student protesters (from KTLA TV) Do you want to see police brutality? Here is one example, just click on the picture)


UC Davis will probe use of pepper-spray on student protesters (from KTLA TV)

UC Davis will probe use of pepper-spray on student protesters (from KTLA TV) Do you want to see police brutality? Here is one example, just click here)

From KTLA: “As indicated in various videos, the police used pepper spray against the students who were blocking the way,” she said. “The use of pepper spray as shown on the video is chilling to us all and raises many questions about how best to handle situations like this.”

Student protesters at Davis had set up an encampment in the university’s quad area earlier this month as part of the nationwide Occupy movement against economic inequality and excesses of the financial system.

Their demonstrations, which had been endorsed by a faculty association, included protests against tuition increases and what they viewed as police brutality on University of California campuses in response to recent protests.

The students had set up roughly 25 tents in a quad area, but they had been asked not to stay overnight and were told they would not be able to stay during the weekend, due to a lack of university resources, Katehi said.

Some protesters took their tents down voluntarily while others stayed. The pepper spray incident appeared to take place on Friday afternoon, when campus police moved in to forcibly evict the protesters.

Katehi said on Friday she was “saddened” by the manner in which protesters were removed from the quad, and on Saturday announced a task force of faculty, students and staff to investigate the incident.
(Source: http://www.ktla.com/news/landing/sns-rt-us-protests-davis-pepperspraytre7ai0za-20111119,0,372487.story)
 

My take on it: Economical Inequality is inequality to life. And is a fundamental human right, guaranteed by the Universal Declaration of  Human Rights. Read more about it, and find out what are your rights, guaranteed by the Organization of the United Nations at: http://www.hrweb.org/legal/undocs.html