Tag Archives: valery gergiev

great compositions/performances: Prokofiev – Symphony No.1 Opus 25 “Classical” (Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra, Valery Gergiev)


Prokofiev – Symphony No.1 Opus 25 “Classical” (Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra, Valery Gergiev)

Published on May 1, 2015

Recorded on 15 April 2012 at the Great Hall of the Moscow Conservatory.

Symphony Orchestra of the Mariinsky Theatre, St Petersburg / Valery Gergiev – musical director

Sergei Prokofiev – Symphony No.1 Opus 25 “Classical” (15’)
0:35 I. Allegro
5:20 II. Larghetto
9:35 III. Gavotta (Non troppo allegro)
11:17 IV. Finale (Molto vivace)

The Easter Festival is an internationally renowned event among classical music lovers, traditionally opened in Moscow on Easter Sunday. Each year the Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra and its musical director Valery Gergiev travel across Russia – for the past 10 years now!
In 2012 we were given an exceptional musical gift: the Mariinsky Theatre Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Valery Gergiev performed the complete cycle of Sergei Prokofiev’s symphonies and piano concerti – a composer with whom Maestro Gergiev and the orchestra seem particularly in tune.

 

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Borodin: Symphony No.2 in B minor – Gergiev / Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra


Borodin: Symphony No.2 in B minor – Gergiev / Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra

Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade / Gergiev · Vienna Philharmonic · Salzburg Festival 2005 , great compositions/performances


Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade / Gergiev · Vienna Philharmonic · Salzburg Festival 2005

Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra , great compositions/performances


Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra

Carl Maria von Weber, Konzertstück f-moll für Klavier und Orchester, Op.79. Alfred Brendel & London Symphony Orchestra: great compositions/performances


Carl Maria von Weber, Konzertstück f-moll für Klavier und Orchester, Op.79. Alfred Brendel & LSO

Romeo and Juliet Overture – Prokofiev: make music part of your life series



from

Romeo and Juliet Overture – Prokofiev

Performed by the KU Symphonic Orchestra

Shostakovich: Ballet Suite No. 4: make music par of your life series


Shostakovich: Ballet Suite No. 4

The Queer Urban Orchestra, under the direction of Nolan Dresden, performs Dmitri Shostakovich’s Ballet Suite No. 4 at our Mysterium concert, March 20, 2011. The work is in three movements:
I – Introduction and Variations;
II – Waitz; and
III – Scherzo.

great compositions/performances: Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000


[youtube.com/watch?v=RZkIAVGlfWk]

Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000

Great presentation of the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by the russian Maestro Valery Gergiev, in one of the most powerful and greatest presentation of The Firebird (L’Oiseau de feu) of Igor Stravinsky at Salzburg Festival 2000.

(C) Deusche Grammophon, ORF/RM Associates Limited , Music Publishing Rights Collecting Society, UMPG Publishing and all their respective owners. There’s no personal work here.

(C) Deutsche Grammophon, ORF/RM Associates Limited et toutes leurs propriétaires respectifs.

The Firebird

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso collaborated...

Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso collaborated on Pulcinella in 1920. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This article is about the ballet to Stravinsky’s 1910 music. For other uses of the word, see Firebird.

The Firebird (French: L’oiseau de feu; Russian: «Жар-птица», Zhar-ptitsa) is a ballet and orchestral concert work by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky. It was written for the 1910 Paris season of Sergei Diaghilev‘s Ballets Russes company, with choreography by Michel Fokine. The ballet is based on Russian folk tales of the magical glowing bird that can be both a blessing and a curse to its owner. When the ballet was first performed on 25 June 1910, it was an instant success with both audience and critics.

Stravinsky was a young, virtually unknown composer when Diaghilev recruited him to create works for the Ballets Russes. The Firebird was his first project. Originally, Diaghilev approached the Russian composer Anatoly Lyadov, but later hired Stravinsky to compose the music.

The ballet has historic significance not only as Stravinsky’s breakthrough piece — “Mark him well”, said Sergei Diaghilev to Tamara Karsavina, who was dancing the title role: “He is a man on the eve of celebrity…” — but also as the beginning of the collaboration between Diaghilev and Stravinsky that would also produce Petrushka and The Rite of Spring.

Genesis and premiere

The ballet was the first of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes productions to have an all-original score composed for it. Alexandre Benois wrote in 1910 that he had two years earlier suggested to Diaghilev the production of a Russian nationalist ballet,[7] an idea all the more attractive given both the newly awakened French passion for Russian dance and also the ruinously expensive costs of staging opera. The inspiration of mixing the mythical Firebird with the unrelated Russian tale of Kaschei the deathless possibly came from a popular child’s verse by Yakov Polonsky, “A Winter’s Journey” (Zimniy put, 1844), which includes the lines:

And in my dreams I see myself on a wolf’s back
Riding along a forest path
To do battle with a sorcerer-tsar [i.e., Kaschei]]
In that land where a princess sits under lock and key,
Pining behind massive walls.
There gardens surround a palace all of glass;
There Firebirds sing by night
And peck at golden fruit.[8]

great compositions/performances: Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000


[youtube.com/watch?v=RZkIAVGlfWk]

Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000

Great presentation of the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by the russian Maestro Valery Gergiev, in one of the most powerful and greatest presentation of The Firebird (L’Oiseau de feu) of Igor Stravinsky at Salzburg Festival 2000.

great compositions/performancesTchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra


[youtube.com/watch?v=ZxOtYNf-eWE]

Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra

Published by  Adagietto on Jan 13, 2013/ 108,521 views

From Adagietto:
Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, fantasy-overture for orchestra in B minor, 1880. Maestro Valery Gergiev with the London Symphony Orchestra.

Numerous composers have responded to Shakespeare’s timeless drama of forbidden and youthful love, but Tchaikovsky’s response (along with Berlioz’s and Prokofiev’s) is at the top of the list. It is the only one of the three to be intended as a number in a symphony concert, and, hence is by default the most famous of the lot.

Tchaikovsky, a lawyer, was still developing as a composer at age 29 when Mily Balakirev (self-appointed father figure to Russian composers) persuaded him to write an orchestral work on the subject of the “star-cross’d lovers.” Balakirev outlined the form, planned the keys, and even suggested some of the actual music. After the 1870 premiere, he convinced Tchaikovsky to revise it. The work’s success in this form did much to transform the composer’s tendency toward crippling doubt into useful self-criticism. (Not that the transformation was ever total; Tchaikovsky suffered bouts of depression and self-doubt throughout his career.) The composer revised it again in 1880; this version is almost universally the one played. While the final version is probably the best one, the 1869 text is also a fine work and very much worth hearing. The earlier version begins with a charming tune that carries elements of the great love theme. In the first and second revisions Tchaikovsky eliminated this and replaced it with the benedictory theme representing Friar Laurence. The effect of this change on the overture’s structure is large. The first version seems to begin with Juliet still in a relatively childlike state, but with the potential for the great love present in the disguised premonitions of the love theme. The focus is, therefore, on the development of the drama as it unfolds. The later versions, beginning as it were with a prayer, seem to invite the hearer to look back on a tragedy that has already happened. Both versions proceed identically through depictions of the clashes between the houses of Montague and Capulet, and then unveil the great love music. After that, though, Tchaikovsky’s original idea seems to this writer to be superior: There is a great development, fugal-sounding and allowing for contrapuntal conflict based on the overture’s main rhythms and themes. It is tremendously exciting, more so than the music which replaced it. Justification for dropping it might be made along the lines that the original version has too much dramatic weight and overshadows the rest of the music. The main differences thereafter are in details of scoring, and in the finale, which in the original version is much too curt.

It is often instructive to see what a great composer has done at two different times with the same ideas and material. Whether or not it has greater musical merit, Tchaikovsky’s blessing of his final version served to ensure that it is the one that prevailed, and in that form it is accepted as one of the greatest programmatic pieces in the symphonic repertoire. The yearning love theme, in particular, is universally acknowledged as one of the greatest melodies ever written, while the exciting fight music and Tchaikovsky’s unfailingly clear and imaginative orchestration carry the listener through with hardly a misstep. But the original version is not far behind it in musical worth; it should be given more frequent revivals, if only for the sake of hearing the great fugato passage described above.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Romeo und Julia, Romeo y Julieta, Roméo et Juliette, Romeo e Giulietta, Romeo en Julia, Romeu e Julieta, Romeo and Juliet, Romeu i Julieta, Romeo a Juliet, Romeo og Julie, Romeo kaj Julieta, Romeo i Julija, Romeo e Xulieta, Romeo dan Julia, Rómeó és Júlia, Romeo și Julieta, Romeowan Juliet, Romeo dhe Xhuljeta, Romeo ja Julia, Romeo och Julia, Romeo at Julieta, Romeo un Džuljeta

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Joshua Bell – Tchaikovsky – Violin Concerto in D major, Op 35



Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Violin Concerto in D major, Op 35

1 Allegro moderato
2 Canzonetta: Andante
3 Finale. Allegro vivacissimo

Joshua Bell, violin

National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America
Valery Gergiev, conductor

Live recording. London, Proms 2013

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Daniil Trifonov – Glazunov Piano Concerto No 2 in B major



Daniil Trifonov – Glazunov Piano Concerto No 2 in B major

Royal Albert Hall, August 13, 2013 at BBC Proms
London Symphony Orchestra
Valery Gergiev conductor

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FABULOUS COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: Prokofiev: Symphony No. 7 / Gergiev · London Symphony Orchestra



Gran presentación del maestro ruso Valery Gergiev conduciendo a la Orquesta Sinfónica de Londres, interpretando el último y melancólico trabajo de Sergei Prokofiev, su Sinfonía No. 7 en el festival de los Proms de la BBC de Londres el 28 de Agosto del 2007.

Great perfomance of the russian maestro Valery Gergiev conducting the London Symphony Orchestra, playing the last and most-melancholic work of Sergei Prokofiev, his Symphony No. 7 at BBC Proms, August 2007.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/archive/se…

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Tchaikovsky: Romeo & Juliet / Gergiev · London Symphony Orchestra · BBC Proms 2007


Great presentation of russian Maestro Valery Gergiev with the London Symphony Orchestra, playing Tchaikovsky’s Romeo & Juliet at BBC Proms 2007.

(C) BBC and ALL their respective owners. No personal work here.