Tag Archives: Venice

Saint of the Day for Sunday, February 8th, 2015 : St. Jerome Emiliani


Image of St. Jerome Emiliani

St. Jerome Emiliani

Jerome Emiliani lay chained in the dark dirty dungeon. Only a short time before he had been a military commander for Venice in charge of a fortress. He didn’t care much about God because he didn’t … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

Advertisements

Scenes de Ballet for Orchestra in A Major, Op. 52, VII Valse, VIII Polonaise , great compositions/performances


Scenes de Ballet for Orchestra in A Major, Op. 52, VII Valse, VIII Polonaise

Melodie for cello and orchestra Op.20 No.1 by Alexander Glazunov


Melodie for cello and orchestra Op.20 No.1 by Alexander Glazunov

Ennio Morricone – Cinema Paradiso (In Concerto – Venezia 10.11.07): great compositions/performances


Ennio MorriconeCinema Paradiso (In Concerto – Venezia 10.11.07)

Venice (on my mind) + Venetian and Neapolitan Music for Consort of Viols / L’Amoroso


Venice

The Italian city of Venice spans more than 100 small islands in the Venetian Lagoon of the Adriatic Sea. Separating the islands are about 150 narrow canals crossed by some 400 bridges. The curving Grand Canal is the city’s main traffic artery. Now a tourist, commercial, and industrial center, Venice was at its artistic peak during the Renaissance, and it owes its origin to refugees who came to the islands while fleeing Lombard invaders in the 6th century. What are traghetti? More… Discuss

 

Saint of the Day for Thursday, August 21st, 2014: St. Pius X


Image of St. Pius X

Saint of the Day for Thursday, August 21st, 2014: St. Pius X

Facts

Feastday: August 21

On June 2, 1835, Giuseppe Melchiorre Sarto saw the light of earth at Riesi, Province of Treviso, in Venice; on August 20, 1914, he saw the light of heaven; and on May 29, 1954, he who had become the two hundred fifty-ninth pope was canonized St. Pius X.

Two of the most outstanding accomplishments of this saintly Pope were the inauguration of the liturgical renewal and the restoration of frequent communion from childhood. He also waged an unwavering war against the heresy and evils of Modernism, gave great impetus to biblical studies, and brought about the codification of Canon Law. His overriding concern was to renew all things in Christ.

Above all, his holiness shone forth conspicuously. From St. Pius X we learn again that “the folly of the Cross”, simplicity of life, and humility of heart are still the highest wisdom and the indispensable conditions of a perfect Christian life, for they are the very source of all apostolic fruitfulness.

His last will and testament bears the striking sentence: “I was born poor, I have lived in poverty, and I wish to die poor.” His feast day is August 21.

More Saints of the Day

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi: Sonata for Recorder in C major ‘Il Pastor Fido’ No.1, Op.13, (RV54): make music part of your life series


Antonio Lucio Vivaldi: Sonata for Recorder in C major ‘Il Pastor Fido‘ No.1, Op.13, (RV54)

FROM:
vivaldi369  vivaldi369
Álbum: Antonio Vivaldi: Sonatas for Flute, Op.13 “IL Pastor Fido”
Interpretes del álbum: Bela Drahos, Pal Kelemen & Zsuzsa Pertis
Compositor: Antonio Lucio Vivaldi
Año: 1991
Genero: Barroco Italiano
Movimientos: Moderato-Allegro-Affectuoso-Allegro-Giga

Franz Liszt – Tasso, Lamento e Trionfo: make music part of your life series


Franz Liszt – Tasso, Lamento e Trionfo

FROM

today’s holiday: Fasinada


Fasinada

Fasinada is a commemoration of the tiny island of Gospa od Skrpjela (Our Lady of the Chisels) off Montenegro. The island, according to the story, was once nothing more than a rock; sailors dumped stones there until an island was formed, and in the 17th century a church was built on the pile of rocks. The festival includes a procession to the island of boats decorated with garlands of flowers and loaded with rocks. The rocks are piled up to reinforce the shores of the island, and then the participants enjoy folk dancing and country sports and games. More… Discuss

article: The University of Padua


The University of Padua

The University of Padua is one of the oldest universities in Europe and the second oldest in Italy. It was founded in 1222 by a group of students and faculty from the University of Bologna and has since become a premier institution for higher education in Italy, boasting an enrollment of 65,000 students and an academic staff numbering more than 2,200. Over the course of the university’s long and illustrious history, many famed historical figures passed through its doors, such as what scholars? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

NEWS: PREPARE THE PADDLES: HUMAN ACTIVITIES CAUSING CITIES TO SINK


Prepare the Paddles: Human Activities Causing Cities to Sink

Human activities are speeding the sinking of major coastal cities around the globe, contributing to more frequent, severe, and protracted floodingLand subsidence can occur naturally, but human activities have accelerated the process in some parts of the globe, leading the land there to descend 10 times faster than sea levels are rising. Tokyo, for example, sank two meters as a result of decades of groundwater extraction. Venice suffered similar subsidence until groundwater extraction was halted there in recent years. Unless action is taken, Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, and Bangkok, among other cities, will sink below sea level. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Gioacchino Rossini – La scala di seta – Overture



La scala di seta (The Silken Ladder or Die seidene Leiter) is an operatic farsa comica in one act by Gioachino Rossini to a libretto by Giuseppe Maria Foppa. It was first performed in Venice, Italy at the Teatro San Moisè on May 9, 1812.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: CARNIVAL OF VENICE


Carnival of Venice

The Carnival celebration in Venice, Italy, is more sophisticated than the flashy celebrations that take place in Rio de Janeiro and New Orleans. Costumes for the event are often drawn from the stock characters of Italian popular theater from the 16th through 18th centuries—including traditional costumed characters such as La Bautta (the domino) and Il Dottore (the professor or doctor of law). Italian university students pour into Venice as Ash Wednesday draws near. The rhythm of the celebration quickens, evidenced by a number of spectacular costume ballsMore… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Saint of the Day for Saturday, February 8th, 2014


Saint of the Day for Saturday, February 8th, 2014

Image of St. Jerome Emiliani

Feastday: February 8
1481 – 1537

Jerome Emiliani lay chained in the dark dirty dungeon. Only a short time before he had been a military commander for Venice in charge of a fortress. He didn’t care much about God because he didn’t need him — he had his own strength and the strength of his soldiers and weapons. When Venice’s enemies, the League of Cambrai, captured the fortress, he was dragged off and imprisoned. There in the dungeon, Jerome decided to get rid of the chains that bound him. He let go of his worldly attachments and embraced God.

When he finally was able to escape, he hung his metal chains in the nearby church of Treviso — in gratitude not only for being freed from physical prison but from his spiritual dungeon as well.

After a short time as mayor of Treviso he returned his home inVenice where he studied for the priesthood. The war may have been over but it was followed by the famine and plague war’s devastation often brought. Thousands suffered in his beloved city. Jerome devoted himself to service again — this time, not to the military but the poor and suffering around him. He felt a special call to help the orphans who had no one to care for them. All the loved ones who would have protected them and comforted them had been taken by sickness or starvation. He would become their parent, their family.

Using his own money, he rented a house for the orphans, fed them, clothed them, and educated them. Part of his education was to give them the first known catechetical teaching by question and answer. But his constant devotion to the suffering put him in danger too and he fell ill from the plague himself. When he recovered, he had the ideal excuse to back away, but instead his illness seemed to take the last links of the chain from his soul. Once again he interpreted his suffering to be a sign of how little the ambitions of the world mattered.

He committed his whole life and all he owned to helping others. He founded orphanages in other cities, a hospital, and a shelter for prostitutes. This grew into a congregation of priests and brothers that was named after the place where they had a house: the Clerks Regular of Somascha. Although they spent time educating other young people, their primary work was always Jerome’s first love — helping orphans.

His final chains fell away when he again fell ill while taking care of the sick. He died in 1537 at the age of 56.

He is the patron saint of abandoned children and orphans.

More Saints of the Day

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Comopositions/Performances: Alessandro Marcello Concerto en re minore (D minor), SF 935 – Op.1. Maurice André



Alessandro Marcello 

Concerto en re minore (D minor), SF 935 – Op.1.

I. Andante 
II. Adagio
III. Presto
Maurice André,  1993

 

Alessandro Marcello

Cover of Alessandro Marcello

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  

 

Alessandro Ignazio Marcello (1st February 1673[1] in Venice – 19 June 1747 in Venice) was an Italian nobleman, poet, philosopher, mathematician and musician.

 

Biography

 

A contemporary of Tomaso Albinoni, Marcello was the son of a senator in Venice. As such, he enjoyed a comfortable life that gave him the scope to pursue his interest in music. He held concerts in his hometown and also composed and published several sets of concertos, including six concertos under the title of La Cetra (The Lyre), as well as cantatasariascanzonets, and violin sonatas. Marcello, being a slightly older contemporary of Antonio Vivaldi, often composed under the pseudonym Eterio Stinfalico, his name as a member of the celebrated Arcadian Academy (Pontificia Accademia degli Arcadi). He died in Padua in 1747.

 

Alessandro’s brother was Benedetto Marcello, also a composer, who illegally married his singing student Rosanna Scalfi in 1728. After his death she was unable to inherit his estate, and in 1742 she filed suit against Alessandro Marcello, seeking financial support.[2]

 

Works

 

Although his works are infrequently performed today, Marcello is regarded as a very competent composer. His La Cetra concertos are “unusual for their wind solo parts, concision and use of counterpoint within a broadly Vivaldian style,” according to Grove, “placing them as a last outpost of the classic Venetian Baroque concerto.”

 

concerto op 1. Marcello wrote in D minor for oboestrings and basso continuo is perhaps his best-known work. Its worth was affirmed by Johann Sebastian Bach who transcribed it for harpsichord (BWV 974). A number of editions have been published of the famous Oboe Concerto in D minor. The edition in C minor is credited to Benedetto Marcello.

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Composers/Compositions: Vivaldi Violin Concerto in C major, ‘Il piacere’ Op.8 No.6, RV180



Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678 † 1741)
Concerts for the Prince of Poland
Work: Violin Concerto in C major, ‘Il piacere’ Op.8 No.6, RV180

01. Allegro
02. Largo e cantabile
03. Allegro

Andrew Manze, violin & director
Academy of Ancient Music

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  

“Vivaldi” redirects here. For other uses, see Vivaldi (disambiguation).

Antonio Vivaldi in 1725

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (Italian: [anˈtɔːnjo ˈluːtʃo viˈvaldi]; 4 March 1678 – 28 July 1741), nicknamed il Prete Rosso (“The Red Priest”) because of his red hair, was an Italian Baroque composer, Catholic priest, andvirtuoso violinist, born in Venice. Recognized as one of the greatest Baroque composers, his influence during his lifetime was widespread over Europe. Vivaldi is known mainly for composing instrumental concertos, especially for the violin, as well as sacred choral works and over forty operas. His best known work is a series of violin concertos known as The Four Seasons.

Many of his compositions were written for the female music ensemble of the Ospedale della Pietà, a home for abandoned children where Vivaldi had been employed from 1703 to 1715 and from 1723 to 1740. Vivaldi also had some success with stagings of his operas in VeniceMantua and Vienna. After meeting the Emperor Charles VI, Vivaldi moved to Vienna, hoping for preferment. However, the Emperor died soon after Vivaldi’s arrival and Vivaldi himself died less than a year later.

Though Vivaldi’s music was well received during his lifetime, it later declined in popularity until its vigorous revival in the first half of the 20th century. Today, Vivaldi ranks among the most popular and widely recorded of Baroque composers, second only to Johann Sebastian Bach.[1]

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Domenico Cimarosa overture “Cleopatra”


 
 

Domenico Cimarosa (17 December 1749, AversaProvince of Caserta – 11 January 1801, Venice) was an Italian operacomposer of the Neapolitan school. He wrote more than eighty operas during his lifetime, including his masterpiece, Il matrimonio segreto (1792).

Cimarosa was born in Aversa in Campania.  His parents were poor, but, anxious to give their son a good education, they sent him to a free school connected with one of the monasteries in Naples after moving to that city. The organist of the monastery, Padre Polcano, was struck by the boy’s intellect, and voluntarily instructed him in the elements of music and also in the ancient and modern literature of his country. Because of his influence, Cimarosa obtained a scholarship at the musical institute of Santa Maria di Loreto in Naples, where he remained for eleven years, chiefly studying with great masters of the old Italian school; Niccolò PiccinniAntonio Sacchini, and other musicians of repute are mentioned among his teachers.

 

FLOODGATES ON THEIR WAY TO KEEPING VENETIANS’ FEET DRY


Floodgates on Their Way to Keeping Venetians’ Feet Dry

High tides swamp Venice on an annual basis, but a barrier project 10 years in the making will hopefully protect the historic city from the worst of it. Billions have already been spent on the “Moses” project, and it is at least two years from completion. Some question whether the ambitious project will pay off, but planners are heartened by the first successful test of the system, in which four—of what will eventually be 78—large floodgates were raised from the seabed. More…Discuss

 

A. Marcello – Oboe Concerto in d minor (Marcel Ponseele, baroque oboe / Il Gardellino)



Alessandro Marcello (1684~1750)

Concerto per Oboe, Archi e Basso Continuo in re minore, SF 935 – Op.1 
(First published in 1717)

I. Andante e spiccato – 00:00
II. Adagio – 03:32
III. Presto – 07:09

Marcel Ponseele (Baroque Oboe)
Ensemble Il Gardellino 
Marcel Ponseele (conductor)

A slightly older contemporary of Antonio Vivaldi, Marcello held concerts at his hometown of Venice. He composed and published several sets of concertos, including six concertos under the title of La Cetra (The Lyre), as well as cantatas, arias, canzonets, and violin sonatas. Marcello often composed under the pseudonym Eterio Stinfalico, his name as a member of the celebrated Arcadian Academy (Pontificia Accademia degli Arcadi). He died in Padua in 1747. Alessandro’s brother was Benedetto Marcello (1686~1739), also a composer.

Although his works are infrequently performed today, Marcello is regarded as a very competent composer. His La Cetra concertos are “unusual for their wind solo parts, concision and use of counterpoint within a broadly Vivaldian style,” according to Grove, “placing them as a last outpost of the classic Venetian Baroque concerto.”

A concerto Marcello wrote in d minor for oboe, strings and basso continuo is perhaps his best-known work. Its worth was attested to by Johann Sebastian Bach who transcribed it for harpsichord (BWV 974). A number of editions have been published of the famous Oboe Concerto in d minor. The edition in c minor is credited to Benedetto Marcello.

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: LANDSLIDE IN ITALY CLAIMS MORE THAN 2,000 LIVES (1963)


Landslide in Italy Claims More Than 2,000 Lives (1963)

One of the highest dams in the world, the Vaiont Dam was constructed on the Vaiont River about 60 mi (100 km) north of Venice, Italy. Two years after its completion, a massive landslide fell into its reservoir, causing the stored water to spill over the dam, sweeping away the village of Longarone and flooding several nearby towns. Some 2,000 people drowned. The dam itself surprisingly remained intact. In 2008, who cited the disaster as one of five “cautionary tales” for engineers and geologists? More… Discuss

 

Franz Liszt – Tasso, Lamento e Trionfo



Franz Liszt (October 22, 1811 — July 31, 1886) was a 19th-century Hungarian composer, pianist, conductor, and teacher.

Liszt became renowned throughout Europe during the nineteenth century for his virtuosic skill as a pianist. He was said by his contemporaries to have been the most technically advanced pianist of his age and perhaps the greatest pianist of all time.

Tasso, Lamento e Trionfo.

Franz Liszt composed his Tasso, Lamento e trionfo (Tasso, Lament and Triumph) in 1849, revising it in 1850-51 and again in 1854. It is numbered No. 2 in his cycle of 13 symphonic poems written during his Weimar period.

Liszt’s first sketch for this work is dated August 1, 1849. He had heard the principal theme for Tasso in Venice, Italy several years earlier, however, using it in the 1840 version of his piano piece “Chant do Goldolier” in Venezia e Napoli. Liszt completed the 1849 verion of Tasso as an overture in two sections, giving it to August Conradi to orchestrate. This version was performed in Weimar, Germany on the centennial of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe‘s birth as an overture to his drama Torquato Tasso. Liszt later corrected Conradi’s score and had Joachim Raff produce a new score in 1850–51. Liszt then revised this score extensively, adding a central section. This version was performed on April 19, 1854 in Weimar, conducted by Liszt.

Conductor: Michel Plasson
Orchestra: Dresdner Philharmonie

 

Vivaldi : Concerto ripieno in sol maggiore RV 151 ”Alla Rustica”



Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) : Concerto in Sol maggiore RV 151 ”Alla Rustica” per archi e continuo
1) Presto 2) Adagio 3) Allegro
I Solisti Veneti, Claudio Scimone