Tag Archives: Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra Christian Thielemann

make music part of your life series: Beethoven – Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67 – Thielemann


[youtube.com/watch?v=7jh-E5m01wY]

Beethoven – Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67 – Thielemann

Ludwig van Beethoven
Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67

1 Allegro con brio
2 Andante con moto
3 Allegro
4 Allegro

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Christian Thielemann, conductor

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36 – Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra Christian Thielemann, conductor


[youtube.com/watch?v=JNsIe5AeEwI]

Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Christian Thielemann, conductor

This symphony consists of four movements:

  1. Adagio molto, 3/4 – Allegro con brio, 4/4
  2. Larghetto, 3/8 in A major
  3. Scherzo: Allegro, 3/4
  4. Allegro molto, 2/2

A typical performance runs 33 to 36 minutes.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, a year after the premiere of his Second Symphony.

The Symphony No. 2 in D major (Op. 36) is a symphony in four movements written by Ludwig van Beethoven between 1801 and 1802. The work is dedicated to Karl Alois, Prince Lichnowsky.

 

Background

 

Beethoven’s Second Symphony was mostly written during Beethoven’s stay at Heiligenstadt in 1802, at which time his deafness was becoming more apparent and he began to realize that it might be incurable. The work was premiered in the Theater an der Wien in Vienna on 5 April 1803, and was conducted by the composer. During that same concert, the Third Piano Concerto and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives were also debuted.[1] It is one of the last works of Beethoven’s so-called “early period”.

 

Beethoven wrote the Second Symphony without a standard minuet; instead, a scherzo took its place, giving the composition even greater scope and energy. The scherzo and the finale are filled with vulgar Beethovenian musical jokes, which shocked the sensibilities of many contemporary critics. One Viennese critic for the Zeitung fuer die elegante Welt (Newspaper for the Elegant World) famously wrote of the Symphony that it was “a hideously writhing, wounded dragon that refuses to die, but writhing in its last agonies and, in the fourth movement, bleeding to death.”[2]

Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta