Tag Archives: vienna philharmonic

Historic musical bits: Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic


 Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic

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Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim


historical musical bits (1985): Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic, great compositions/performances


Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic

Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim, great compositions/performances


© Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (whole concert)

Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade / Gergiev · Vienna Philharmonic · Salzburg Festival 2005 , great compositions/performances


Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade / Gergiev · Vienna Philharmonic · Salzburg Festival 2005

Wine, Women and Song – Johann Strauss Jr.


Sibelius, Symphonie Nr 7 C Dur op 105 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


Sibelius, Symphonie Nr 7 C Dur op 105 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker

Johann Strauss II. – Geschichten aus dem Wiener Wald (Walzer, op.325): make music part of your life series


Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

(September 8, 1988, Luzern)

Gustav Mahler – Symphony Nº 5. IV Adagietto | Vienna Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein (4/5) (from Adagietto’s You Tube Channel): make music part of your life series


Gustav Mahler – Symphony Nº 5. IV Adagietto | Vienna Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein (4/5) (from Adagietto’s You Tube Channel)

Gustav Mahler – Symphony Nº 5 in C sharp minor, 1901-02.
Wiener Philharmoniker, Vienna Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein.
[HD] Adagietto http://youtu.be/15WQNKhaCHY

Movements:
I Trauermarsch. In gemessenem Schritt. Streng. Wie ein Kondukt. http://youtu.be/tPpm323M_Ik
II Stürmisch bewegt, mit größter Vehemenz http://youtu.be/JwxrTsSQf0Y
III Scherzo. Kräftig, nicht zu schnell http://youtu.be/SKPlH6L5zeE
IV Adagietto. Sehr langsam. http://youtu.be/yjz2TvC2TT4
V Rondo-Finale. Allegro – Allegro giocoso. Frisch http://youtu.be/U5573xP6JkU

Complete Playlist http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPpm32…

“In the Fourth movement, the famous Adagietto, harp and strings alone play. The opening melody recalls two of Mahler’s songs, “Nun seh’ ich wohl” (from Kindertotenlieder) and the separate Ruckert setting “Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen”. The long upbeats and expressive appoggiaturas of the melodic lines give the music a yearning, almost heart-breaking quality. The intensity that builds up inthis movement finaly assuages the darkness and doubts of the earlier movements, making the lighter mood and extrovert energy of the Rondo-Finale acceptable. Together, these two movements form the third part of the symphony. The formal function of the Adagietto is ambiguous. It acts as an introduction to the last movement, which follows without a break, and is thematically bound to it, for twice in the Finale we hear the Adagietto’s main theme, now at a fast tempo. The Adagietto also functions as a slow interlude in F major, between two faster movements in D major; but is also has an expressive weight sufficient for it to stand on its own – indeed, it is often performed by itself.

Even without a text or programme, the music’s emotional and referential content implies an existential dimension. Without an explicit programme or titles, we have few clues to the “meaning” of the Fifth Symphony other than the music itself. Mahler offers some guidance by grouping the five movements, which share some thematic Material, as well as an obsession with death, from the first part; the central scherzo stands alone as the second part; and the lat two movements, which are also linked thematically, form the third.

An essential aspect of Mahler’s symphonies is the idea of emotional and spiritual progression, through various alternatives to a (provisional) conclusion. One important means he uses to articulate this spiritual journey is the technique of progressive tonality. In other symphonies he begins and ends movements in diferent keys, but in the Fifth each movement begins and ends in the same key; however as a whole, it moves from C sharp minor opening movement to the D major of the third and fifth movements.

One reason for Mahler’s significance and influence as a composer is that he viewed his music as a means of seeking and expressing solutions to the problems of his personal, spiritual life. The Depth and seriousness of these problems naturally drew him to the largescale form of the symphony, wich he expanded in length and number of movements to unprecedented proportions.

Mahler kept revising the orchestration of this work until his death. He conducted the first performance with the Gürzenich Orchestra in Cologne on October 18, 1904. He’d begun the Fifth Symphony at Maiernegg in 1901 – writing the third, first and second movements in that order, after a death-obsessed song, “Der Tamboursg’sell,” and the Kindertotenlieder cycle (“on the death of children”). After nearly bleeding to death the previous winter (from an intestinal hemorrhage), Mahler’s symphonic orientation underwent a profound change. Mahler cast his Fifth Symphony in five movements that fall naturally into three parts.

The First begins in C sharp minor with a Funeral March, of measured tread and austere (Movement I). A sonata-form movement follows, marked “Stormily, with greatest vehemence” (Movement II), which shares themes as well as mood with the opening.

The Second Part (which Mahler composed first) is a Scherzo: “Vigorously, not too fast” (Movement III) — the symphony’s shortest large section, but its longest single movement. This emphatically joyous, albeit manic movement puts forward D major as the work’s focal key. Although its form has remained a topic of debate since 1904, rondo and sonata-form elements are both present.

Part Three begins with a seraphic Adagietto: “Very slowly” (Movement IV). This is indubitably related to the Rückert song Mahler composed in August 1901, “Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen” (I have become lost to the world…I live alone in my heaven, in my loving, in my song). A Rondo-Finale: “Allegro giocoso, lively” (Movement V) concludes the symphony, although Mahler devised a form far removed from classic models. While sectional, in truth episodic, this too has elements of sonata form.

Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

September 8, 1988, Luzern

 

 

great compositions/performances: Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000


[youtube.com/watch?v=RZkIAVGlfWk]

Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000

Great presentation of the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by the russian Maestro Valery Gergiev, in one of the most powerful and greatest presentation of The Firebird (L’Oiseau de feu) of Igor Stravinsky at Salzburg Festival 2000.

(C) Deusche Grammophon, ORF/RM Associates Limited , Music Publishing Rights Collecting Society, UMPG Publishing and all their respective owners. There’s no personal work here.

(C) Deutsche Grammophon, ORF/RM Associates Limited et toutes leurs propriétaires respectifs.

The Firebird

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso collaborated...

Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso collaborated on Pulcinella in 1920. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This article is about the ballet to Stravinsky’s 1910 music. For other uses of the word, see Firebird.

The Firebird (French: L’oiseau de feu; Russian: «Жар-птица», Zhar-ptitsa) is a ballet and orchestral concert work by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky. It was written for the 1910 Paris season of Sergei Diaghilev‘s Ballets Russes company, with choreography by Michel Fokine. The ballet is based on Russian folk tales of the magical glowing bird that can be both a blessing and a curse to its owner. When the ballet was first performed on 25 June 1910, it was an instant success with both audience and critics.

Stravinsky was a young, virtually unknown composer when Diaghilev recruited him to create works for the Ballets Russes. The Firebird was his first project. Originally, Diaghilev approached the Russian composer Anatoly Lyadov, but later hired Stravinsky to compose the music.

The ballet has historic significance not only as Stravinsky’s breakthrough piece — “Mark him well”, said Sergei Diaghilev to Tamara Karsavina, who was dancing the title role: “He is a man on the eve of celebrity…” — but also as the beginning of the collaboration between Diaghilev and Stravinsky that would also produce Petrushka and The Rite of Spring.

Genesis and premiere

The ballet was the first of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes productions to have an all-original score composed for it. Alexandre Benois wrote in 1910 that he had two years earlier suggested to Diaghilev the production of a Russian nationalist ballet,[7] an idea all the more attractive given both the newly awakened French passion for Russian dance and also the ruinously expensive costs of staging opera. The inspiration of mixing the mythical Firebird with the unrelated Russian tale of Kaschei the deathless possibly came from a popular child’s verse by Yakov Polonsky, “A Winter’s Journey” (Zimniy put, 1844), which includes the lines:

And in my dreams I see myself on a wolf’s back
Riding along a forest path
To do battle with a sorcerer-tsar [i.e., Kaschei]]
In that land where a princess sits under lock and key,
Pining behind massive walls.
There gardens surround a palace all of glass;
There Firebirds sing by night
And peck at golden fruit.[8]

today’s holiday: Bascarsija Nights


Bascarsija Nights

One of Bosnia and Herzegovina‘s biggest events, Bascarsija Nights is a month-long celebration of culture. Artistic expressions ranging from street theatre to classical symphony make up this festival held in the country’s capital, Sarajevo; one well-established tradition is the opening night performance by the Sarajevo Philharmonic Orchestra. The remaining days are marked by events offering sophisticated entertainment—theatre, book readings, ballet, art exhibits—as well as popular fare like rock concerts, movie screenings, and folklore presentations.
More… Discuss

[youtube.com/watch?v=zQvTfZbRCkA]

Allegro [0:05]
Andante [3:34]
Allegro Vivo[7:15]
Sonata by Joaquín Turina for solo guitar performed by Rafael Andia at Baščaršija Nights Festival in Sarajevo 1998
CD Harmonia Mundi, see http://www.rafaelandia.com

great compositions/performances: Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000


[youtube.com/watch?v=RZkIAVGlfWk]

Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000

Great presentation of the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by the russian Maestro Valery Gergiev, in one of the most powerful and greatest presentation of The Firebird (L’Oiseau de feu) of Igor Stravinsky at Salzburg Festival 2000.

make music part of your life series: Beethoven – Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67 – Thielemann


[youtube.com/watch?v=7jh-E5m01wY]

Beethoven – Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67 – Thielemann

Ludwig van Beethoven
Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67

1 Allegro con brio
2 Andante con moto
3 Allegro
4 Allegro

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Christian Thielemann, conductor

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great compositions/performances: F. Schubert – Symphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 (Harnoncourt)


[youtube.com/watch?v=CnoI-sYtCOU]

F. SchubertSymphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 Conductor – Nikolaus Harnoncourt
Wiener Philharmoniker
Musikvereinssaal Wien

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The symphony has four movements (a performance lasts around 30 minutes.)
  1. Adagio molto – Allegro vivace
  2. Andante in A flat major
  3. Menuetto. Allegro vivace – Trio in E flat major
  4. Allegro

The Symphony No. 4 in C minor, D. 417, commonly called the Tragic (German: Tragische), was composed by Franz Schubert in April 1816.[1] It was completed one year after the Third Symphony, when Schubert was 19 years old. However, the work was premiered only on November 19, 1849, in Leipzig, more than two decades after Schubert’s death.[citation needed]

The title Tragic is Schubert’s own. It was added to the autograph manuscript some time after the work was completed.[1] It is not known exactly why he added the title, but the work is one of only two symphonies (the Unfinished Symphony is the other) which Schubert wrote in a minor key.

The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 4 horns in A-flat, C and E-flat, 2 trumpets in C and E-flat, timpani and strings.

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Historic musical moments: Brahms – Symphony No. 2 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Leonard Bernstein – 1982


[youtube.com/watch?v=n-qMtWVf0NA]

Brahms – Symphony No. 2Wiener PhilharmonikerLeonard Bernstein – 1982

Johannes Brahms
Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 73

I. Allegro non troppo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (00:42)
II. Adagio non troppo – L’istesso tempo, ma grazioso . . . (21:53)
III. Allegretto grazioso (quasi andantino) . . . . . . . . . . . . (34:41)
IV. Finale. Allegro con spirito . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (40:13)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein

Recorded live at the Große Musikvereinssaal
Vienna, 1-6 September 1982

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Historic Musical Moments: Beethoven / Herbert von Karajan, 1952: Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93 – VPO, Entre LP


[youtube.com/watch?v=Soe8aJ3EAJk]

Beethoven / Herbert von Karajan, 1952: Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93 – VPO, Entre LP

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Great Compositions/Performances: Wagner Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg; Prelude to Act I; Solti


[youtube.com/watch?v=3nhcTllJgIY]

Wagner Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg; Prelude to Act I; Solti

Wilhelm Richard Wagner
Sir Georg Solti
Vienna Philharmonic

This piece introduces the first act of the composer’s music drama called The Mastersingers of Nuremberg. Similar to his other operas, he wrote the scenario and libretto in addition to the musical score.

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Happy Mother’s Day! Johann Strauss II – The Blue Danube Waltz – Vienna Philharmonic


[youtube.com/watch?v=PCge-suZLWw]

Happy Mother’s Day! Johann Strauss II – The Blue Danube WaltzVienna Philharmonic

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36 – Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra Christian Thielemann, conductor


[youtube.com/watch?v=JNsIe5AeEwI]

Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Christian Thielemann, conductor

This symphony consists of four movements:

  1. Adagio molto, 3/4 – Allegro con brio, 4/4
  2. Larghetto, 3/8 in A major
  3. Scherzo: Allegro, 3/4
  4. Allegro molto, 2/2

A typical performance runs 33 to 36 minutes.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, a year after the premiere of his Second Symphony.

The Symphony No. 2 in D major (Op. 36) is a symphony in four movements written by Ludwig van Beethoven between 1801 and 1802. The work is dedicated to Karl Alois, Prince Lichnowsky.

 

Background

 

Beethoven’s Second Symphony was mostly written during Beethoven’s stay at Heiligenstadt in 1802, at which time his deafness was becoming more apparent and he began to realize that it might be incurable. The work was premiered in the Theater an der Wien in Vienna on 5 April 1803, and was conducted by the composer. During that same concert, the Third Piano Concerto and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives were also debuted.[1] It is one of the last works of Beethoven’s so-called “early period”.

 

Beethoven wrote the Second Symphony without a standard minuet; instead, a scherzo took its place, giving the composition even greater scope and energy. The scherzo and the finale are filled with vulgar Beethovenian musical jokes, which shocked the sensibilities of many contemporary critics. One Viennese critic for the Zeitung fuer die elegante Welt (Newspaper for the Elegant World) famously wrote of the Symphony that it was “a hideously writhing, wounded dragon that refuses to die, but writhing in its last agonies and, in the fourth movement, bleeding to death.”[2]

Related articles

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Ottorino Respighi, The Pines of Rome, Karajan



Ottorino Respighi, The Pines of Rome. Maestro Herbert von Karajan conducting the Vienna Philharmonic.

Great Performances: Brahms, Symphony Nr 3 F Dur op 90 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker


 

Vienna New Year’s Concert 2013 – Richard Wagner: Prelude to Act III of ‘Lohengrin,’ WWV 75



Richard Wagner: Prelude to Act III of the Romantic Opera ‘Lohengrin‘ / Preludio del acto III de la ópera romántica “Lohengrin”, WWV 75

New Year’s Concert of the Vienna Philharmonic, conducted by Franz Welser-Möst, at the Golden Hall of the Musikverein in Vienna, Austria on January 1, 2013. 

Concierto de Año Nuevo de la Orquesta Filarmónica de Viena, dirigida por Franz Welser-Möst, en la Sala Dorada de la Musikverein de Viena (Austria) el 01/01/2013.

Playlist / Lista de reproducción:
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=..

 

Bruckner’s Symphony No.8 w/Karajan conducting “live” in St. Florian (1979)



This is perhaps THE most famous video recording of a Bruckner Symphony.
Many say Bruckner’s 8th is the mount Everest of all symphonies.
Recorded June 4th 1979, and filmed on location in the monastery church in St. Florian, Austria with Herbert von Karajan and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra.

1st Movement starts at: 0:59
2nd Movement starts at: 17:16
3rd Movement starts at: 33:09
4th Movement starts at: 59:36

This video testament is extremely historically important because it helped solidify the international Brucknerfest in Linz after the opening of the new concert hall, the “Brucknerhaus” in 1974. Herbert von Karajan was the first famous international conductor to conduct a symphony in the Stiftskirche in St. Florian, which helped establish the reputation of the yearly festival to this day.

Karajan later in an interview related that he was given special access to Bruckner’s underground tomb located beneath the great organ, where he was alone with Bruckner’s sarcophagus for a lengthy amount of time before the performance.

On a side note:
Boulez’s video version IMO greatly pales in comparison to Karajan’s power, sensitivity and spirituality in this 1979 recording…even Karajan’s video remake in 1988 (in Vienna) does not come as close.

One musical scholar stated about this concert: 
“Massive, glowing and infused with cosmic power”.

…so thankfully we can now finally enjoy the performance COMPLETE, and not in chunks!

 

Fabulous Compositions: Aram Khachaturian – Spartacus – Adagio



Aram KhachaturianSpartacusAdagio
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic

 

[La forza del destino] overure – Riccardo Muti, Wiener Philharmoniker



Verdi – La Forza del Destino ‘Overture’ (encore) 

Wiener Philharmoniker 
conducted by RICCARDO MUTI

Live at the Suntory Hall, Tokyo – Oct, 11, 2005.

Mahler Symphony No.5. IV Adagietto | Leonard Bernstein (4/5)



Gustav MahlerSymphony No. 5
IV Adagietto. Sehr langsam.
Vienna Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein

“In the Fourth movement, the famous Adagietto, harp and strings alone play. The opening melody recalls two of Mahler’s songs, “Nun seh’ ich wohl” (from Kindertotenlieder) and the separate Ruckert setting “Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen”. The long upbeats and expressive appoggiaturas of the melodic lines give the music a yearning, almost heart-breaking quality. The intensity that builds up inthis movement finaly assuages the darkness and doubts of the earlier movements, making the lighter mood and extrovert energy of the Rondo-Finale acceptable. Together, these two movements form the third part of the symphony. The formal function of the Adagietto is ambiguous. It acts as an introduction to the last movement, which follows without a break, and is thematically bound to it, for twice in the Finale we hear the Adagietto’s main theme, now at a fast tempo. The Adagietto also functions as a slow interlude in F major, between two faster movements in D major; but is also has an expressive weight sufficient for it to stand on its own – indeed, it is often performed by itself.

Even without a text or programme, the music’s emotional and referential content implies an existential dimension. Without an explicit programme or titles, we have few clues to the “meaning” of the Fifth Symphony other than the music itself. Mahler offers some guidance by grouping the five movements, which share some thematic Material, as well as an obsession with death, from the first part; the central scherzo stands alone as the second part; and the lat two movements, which are also linked thematically, form the third.
Continue reading

Wagner Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg; Prelude to Act I; Solti



Wilhelm Richard Wagner
Sir Georg Solti 
Vienna Philharmonic

This piece introduces the first act of the composer’s music drama called The Mastersingers of Nuremberg. Similar to his other operas, he wrote the scenario and libretto in addition to the musical score.

 

Brahms Symphony No. 3 in F Major Op. 90



Brahms’ third symphony, played by the legendary Vienna Philharmonic, conducted by Istvan Kertesz.

First movement: Beginning
Second movement: 13:29
Third movement: 22:12
Fourth movement: 28:16

Beethoven – Coriolan Overture (Op 62)



The Coriolanus Overture (German: Ouvertüre Coriolan, Op. 62) written in 1807 to Heinrich Joseph von Collin‘s 1804 tragedy. Continue reading

Johann Strauss II – The Blue Danube Waltz – Vienna Philharmonic



Vienna Philharmonic, 01.01.2011, New Year’s Concert, Conductor Franz Welser-Möst, Musikverein, German TV ZDF

New Year’s Concert 2011-Vienna Philharmonic ( What a treat!)


From Wikipedia: “The New Year’s Concert of the Vienna Philharmonic (German: Das Neujahrskonzert der Wiener Philharmoniker) is a concert of classical music that takes place each year in the morning of January 1 in Vienna, Austria. It is broadcast around the world to an estimated audience of 50 million in 73 countries (as of 2012). 

The music always includes pieces from the Strauss family—Johann Strauss IJohann Strauss IIJosef Strauss and Eduard Strauss—with occasional additional music from other mainly Austrian composers, including Joseph Hellmesberger, Jr.Joseph LannerWolfgang Amadeus MozartOtto Nicolai (the Vienna Philharmonic’s founder), Emil von ReznicekFranz Schubert,Franz von Suppé, and Karl Michael Ziehrer. In 2009, music by Joseph Haydn was played for the first time: the 4th movement of his “Farewell” Symphony to mark the 200th anniversary of his death. There are traditionally about a dozen compositions played, with an interval halfway through the concert and encores at the end. They include waltzespolkasmazurkas, and marches. Of the encores, the first is often a fast polka. The second is Johann Strauss II’s waltz The Blue Danube, whose introduction is interrupted by applause of recognition and a New Year greeting from the musicians to the audience. The last is Johann Strauss I’s Radetzky March, during which the audience claps along under the conductor’s wry direction. The complete duration of the event is around two and a half hours.

“Großer Saal” (Large Hall) of the Musikverein

The concerts have been held in the “Großer Saal” (Large Hall) of the Musikverein since 1939. The orchestra is joined by pairs of balletdancers in selected pieces during the second part of the programme. The dancers come from the Vienna State Opera Ballet and dance at different famous places in Austria, as Schönbrunn PalaceSchloss Esterházy, the Vienna State Opera or the Wiener Musikverein itself. Since 1980 the flowers that decorate the hall have been a gift from the city of SanremoLiguria, Italy.

Boskovsky, concertmaster of the orchestra 1936–1979, conducted the Vienna New Year’s concerts from 1955–1979. In 1980, Lorin Maazel became the first non-Austrian conductor of the concert. The practice of choosing a different star conductor every year (and occasional star soloists) began in 1987 after seven appearances in a row by Maazel. Members of the orchestra voted to rotate conductors. This may have occurred with the telecasts going worldwide, perhaps to make the audio and video recordings more marketable. The first of these rotating stars was Herbert von Karajan, an Austrian, then 78 and in frail health.

Conductors

 

Dvorak Slavonic Dance No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker -S. Ozawa


 Dvorak’s Slavonic Dance No.1 In c. (Live Performance with Vienna Philharmonic conducted by Seiji Ozawa)