Tag Archives: Violin concerto

great compositions/performances: ,Hilary Hahn – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 4 in D major, K 218


Hilary Hahn – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 4 in D major, K 218

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Historic Musical Bits: Wieniawski – Violin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22 Isaac Stern and Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy: conductor-1957


Isaak Stern plays Wieniawski-Violin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22 

YE EUN CHOI: Wieniawski Violin Concerto No.2 with Christoph Eschenbach (Schleswig-Holstein Musik Festival), great compositions/performances


YE EUN CHOI: Wieniawski Violin Concerto No.2 with Christoph Eschenbach

Itzhak Perlman – Beethoven Violin Concerto – Daniel Barenboim , great compositions/performances


Itzhak Perlman – Beethoven Violin Concerto – Daniel Barenboim

Hilary Hahn plays Johannes Brahms Violin Concerto in D Op 77


Hilary Hahn plays Johannes Brahms Violin Concerto in D Op 77

Itzhak Perlman – Ludwig van Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D Op 61 – Daniel Barenboim


Itzhak Perlman – Beethoven Violin Concerto – Daniel Barenboim

Max Bruch: Violin Concerto no. 1 in G minor, op. 26 – Akiko Suwanai (諏訪内 晶子), great compositions/performances ( 偉大な組成物/公演)


Max Bruch: Violin Concerto no. 1 in G minor, op. 26 – Akiko Suwanai (諏訪内 晶子)

Movements:

  1. Vorspiel: Allegro moderato

  2. Adagio

  3. Finale: Allegro energico

Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini: Cello Concerto No.3 in D major, (G.476): make music part of your life series


Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini: Cello Concerto No.3 in D major, (G.476)

Mendelssohn — Violin Concerto in e minor op 64: GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES


Isaac Stern – Beethoven, Thriple Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra Op.56: great compositions/performances


Isaac Stern – Beethoven, Thriple Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra Op.56

Mendelssohn-Piano Concerto No. 1 in g minor Op. 25, Rudolf Serkin/Philadelphia Orchestra- Eugene Ormandy: great compositions/perfornmances


Mendelssohn-Piano Concerto No. 1 in g minor Op. 25

Wieniawski-Violin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22: great compositions/performances


WieniawskiViolin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22

Antonín Dvořák – Romantische Stücke, Op. 75: make music part ofyour life series


Antonín Dvořák – Romantische Stücke, Op. 75

Oistrakh plays Wieniawski Legende in G minor, op.17: great compositions/performances


Oistrakh plays Wieniawski Legende in G minor, op.17

Tchaikovsky-Violin Concerto in D Major Op. 35: Great compositions/performances


Tchaikovsky-Violin Concerto in D Major Op. 35 (Complete)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
 

The Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35, was written by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky in 1878. It is one of the best known violin concertos, and is considered one of the most technically difficult works for the violin.

Tchaikovsky.gif

Composition

Tchaikovsky (right) with violinist Iosif Kotek

The piece was written in Clarens, a Swiss resort on the shores of Lake Geneva, where Tchaikovsky had gone to recover from the depression brought on by his disastrous marriage to Antonina Miliukova. He was working on his Piano Sonata in G major but finding it heavy going. Presently he was joined there by his composition pupil, the violinist Iosif Kotek, who had been in Berlin for violin studies with Joseph Joachim. The two played works for violin and piano together, including a violin-and-piano arrangement of Édouard Lalo‘s Symphonie espagnole, which they may have played through the day after Kotek’s arrival. This work may have been the catalyst for the composition of the concerto.[1] He wrote to his patroness Nadezhda von Meck, “It [the Symphonie espagnole] has a lot of freshness, lightness, of piquant rhythms, of beautiful and excellently harmonized melodies…. He [Lalo], in the same way as Léo Delibes and Bizet, does not strive after profundity, but he carefully avoids routine, seeks out new forms, and thinks more about musical beauty than about observing established traditions, as do the Germans.”[2] Tchaikovsky authority Dr. David Brown writes that Tchaikovsky “might almost have been writing the prescription for the violin concerto he himself was about to compose.”[3]

Tchaikovsky made swift, steady progress on the concerto, as by this point in his rest cure he had regained his inspiration, and the work was completed within a month despite the middle movement getting a complete rewrite (a version of the original movement was preserved as the first of the three pieces for violin and piano, Souvenir d’un lieu cher).[4] Since Tchaikovsky was not a violinist, he sought the advice of Kotek on the completion of the solo part.[5] “How lovingly he’s busying himself with my concerto!” Tchaikovsky wrote to his brother Anatoly on the day he completed the new slow movement. “It goes without saying that I would have been able to do nothing without him. He plays it marvelously.”[6]

Great compositions/performances: Ivry Gitlis: PAGANINI Violin Concerto No.2 – Stuttgart RSO, S.Skrowaczewski, live 1972


Ivry Gitlis: PAGANINI Violin Concerto No.2Stuttgart RSO, S.Skrowaczewski, live 1972

Ludwig van Beethoven: Romance for Violin No.1 in G major, Op.40: great compositions/performances


Ludwig van Beethoven: Romance for Violin No.1 in G major, Op.40

RONDO in C – IGNACE PLEYEL: make music part of your life series


RONDO  in C- IGNACE PLEYEL

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev) Erudite Music Channel: make music part of your life series


P. I. TchaikovskySerenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev)

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev): make music part of your life series


P. I. TchaikovskySerenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev)

Vivaldi – The Four Seasons / Autumn Op.8/3, RV 293 / Fabio Biondi: make music part of your life series


3. Vivaldi – The Four Seasons / Autumn Op.8/3, RV 293 / Fabio Biondi

Soyoung Yoon plays at 14th International Wieniawski Violin Competition (Stage 3): make music part of your life series


Soyoung Yoon plays at 14th International Wieniawski Violin Competition (Stage 3)

FROM:

 

Dvořák Humoresque Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman: great compositions/performances



From:  Silvio Finotti  Silvio Finotti

Dvořák Humoresque Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman, Boston Symphony Orchestra / Seiji Ozawa

Brahms-Violin Sonata No. 2 in A Major Op. 100: make music part of your life series


BrahmsViolin Sonata No. 2 in A Major Op. 100

FROM:
Kanaal van viool7

Isaac Stern: violin-Myra Hess: piano-Live-Edinburgh-1960

Antonín Dvořák – Sonatina in G major, Op. 100: make music part of your life series


Antonín Dvořák – Sonatina in G major, Op. 100

Bohuslav Matousek, violin. Petr Adamec, piano

Antonín Dvořák – Sonatina in G major, Op. 100
1. Allegro risoluto 5’52
2. Larghetto 4’02
3. Scherzo 2’56
4. Allegro 6’20

David Oistrakh plays Kodaly Three Hungarian Dances 1954 (great compositions/performances)


David Oistrakh plays Kodaly Three Hungarian Dances 1954

David Oistrakh (1908-1974), Russian violinist

Zoltan Kodaly (1882-1967)
Drei Ungarische Tanze (Three Hungarian Dances)

Naum Walter, piano

Recorded in 1954

Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 (make music part of your life series)


[youtube.com/watch?v=Rt9j8sypi00]

Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1, in G major, op. 40 

Igor Ozim, violin
Vienna Opera Orchestra
Moshe Atzmon

Beethoven’s reputation as a pianist often obscures the fact that he was a very capable violinist. Although not an accomplished master, he possessed a profound love for and understanding of the instrument, evident in his ten violin sonatas, the violin concerto, and numerous quintets, quartets, and other chamber works. The two Romances for violin stand out because they are single-movement works in concerto settings. The Romance in G major was published in 1803 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel in Leipzig; the date of its first performance is not known. Despite the lower opus number, it was composed at least five years after the Romance in F, Op. 50, which was published in 1805. He retained the early Classical orchestra he employed for his earlier Piano Concerto in B flat, Op. 19: one flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, and strings. Often described as a “preparation” for the Violin Concerto, Op. 61, of 1806, the Romance in G stands as a fine work in its own right, clearly demonstrating Beethoven’s mastery of the high-Classical style of Mozart and Haydn. Furthermore, Beethoven creates subtle connections between disparate sections of a work.

Cast in a two-episode rondo format (ABACA coda), the Romance in G is not imbued with sonata-form characteristics, as are many of Beethoven’s later rondo movements. The rondo theme (A) is in two parts, each performed first by the soloist then repeated by the orchestra. Descending sixteenth notes in the solo part mark the beginning of B, in which the orchestra is relegated to a purely accompanimental role, creating unity by including figures from the rondo. Section B spends a significant amount of time on the dominant (D major); however, this does not represent a modulation but a preparation for the return of the rondo in G major. Again, the soloist performs both segments of the A section alone, this time including a running eighth note accompaniment under each of the literally repeated themes. Beethoven set the second episode, C, in E minor. The minor mode, dotted rhythms, and staccato passages give the section a “gypsy” music tinge. The foray into a new key area ends with the return of the G major rondo theme, again played by the soloist, but with accompaniment by the orchestra. Beethoven forgoes the repetition of each of the two parts of the rondo and ends the work with a brief coda featuring a lengthy trill in the solo violin. The three fortissimo chords that close the piece seem oddly, possibly comically, out of place in this generally quiet work, but they do resemble the orchestral string parts at the end of each rondo section. [allmusic.com]

make music part of you life series: Igor Stravinsky – Symphony in C major


[youtube.com/watch?v=_590K7_Dtu0]

Igor Stravinsky – Symphony in C major

Published on Jul 5, 2014

Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971):  Symphony in C major

1. Moderato alla breve
2. Larghetto concertante
3. Allegretto
4. Largo – Tempo giusto, alla breve

L’Orchestre de la Suisse Romande Charles Dutoit, conducting

Fabulous musical moments: Kreisler plays Kreisler – Tambourin chinois


[youtube.com/watch?v=bHwqIL44MRA]

Kreisler plays Kreisler – Tambourin chinois

Fritz Kreisler playing his Tambourin Chinois, op. 3 in 1936. A virtuoso piece with a touch of Oriental ambience.
The pianist is Franz Rupp.

Ion Voicu – Felmake music part of your life series: Mendelssohn – Concerto In E minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 64


[youtube.com/watch?v=Stc6zJxEf-s]

Ion Voicu – Felix Mendelssohn – Concerto In E minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 64

 

make music part of your life series: Felix Bartholdy Mendelssohn – 4 pieces for String Quartet Op. 81 – III. Capriccio


[youtube.com/watch?v=p0JwIUhGtVM]

Felix Bartholdy Mendelssohn – 4 pieces for String Quartet Op. 81 – III. Capriccio  (SHARON QUARTET)

Fabulous musical moments: Dvořák Humoresque Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman


Dvořák Humoresque Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman

make music part of your life series: Antonin Dvorak – Romance in F minor Op 11 – Violin and piano


[youtube.com/watch?v=T0Fv9jKeKX8]

Antonin Dvorak – Romance in F minor Op 11 – Violin and piano

Dvorak museum, Prague

Dvorak museum, Prague (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Antonin Dvorak – Czech Composer, born September 8, 1841 and died 1 May 1904.

great compositions/performances: Dvořák Humoresque Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman


[youtube.com/watch?v=oBDmAxSFt6A]

Dvořák Humoresque Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman

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make music part of your life series: S.Riсhter plays P.Tchaikovsky L’espiegle, Op.72


[youtube.com/watch?v=LX-I89T-MEM]
make music part of your life series:  S.Riсhter plays P.Tchaikovsky L’espiegle, Op.72

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonin Dvorak – Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)


[youtube.com/watch?v=qP-ymoLlKMY]

Antonin Dvorak – Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)

Antonín Leopold Dvořák (September 8, 1841 — May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer. Following the nationalist example of Bedřich Smetana, Dvořák frequently employed features of the folk musics of Moravia and his native Bohemia (then parts of the Austrian Empire and now constituting the Czech Republic). Dvořák’s own style has been described as ‘the fullest recreation of a national idiom with that of the symphonic tradition, absorbing folk influences and finding effective ways of using them.’

Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)

1. Allegro agitato
2. Andante sostenuto (18:09)
3. Allegro con fuoco (26:21)

Rudolf Firkušný, piano and the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra conducted by Walter Susskind.

The Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in G minor, Op. 33, was the first of three concertos that Antonín Dvořák completed—it was followed by a violin concerto and then a cello concerto—and the piano concerto is probably the least known and least performed.

As the eminent music critic Harold Schonberg put it, Dvořák wrote “an attractive Piano Concerto in G minor with a rather ineffective piano part, a beautiful Violin Concerto in A minor, and a supreme Cello Concerto in B minor“.

(bartje11 totally disagrees with the eminent Harold Schonberg)

Dvořák composed his piano concerto from late August through 14 September 1876. Its autograph version contains many corrections, erasures, cuts and additions, the bulk of which were made in the piano part. The work was premiered in Prague on 24 March 1878, with the orchestra of the Prague Provisional Theatre conducted by Adolf Cech with the Czech pianist Karel Slavkovsky.

Dvořák himself realized that he had not created a piece in which the piano does battle with the orchestra, as it is not a virtuosic piece. As Dvořák wrote: “I see I am unable to write a Concerto for a virtuoso; I must think of other things.”
(bartje11: maybe not a work with obvious virtuoso fireworks, but still a very, very difficult piano part, not for the average pianist)

What Dvořák composed, instead, was a symphonic concerto in which the piano plays a leading part in the orchestra, rather than opposed to it.

In an effort to mitigate awkward passages and expand the pianist’s range of sonorities, the Czech pianist and pedagogue Vilém Kurz undertook an extensive re-writing of the solo part; the Kurz revision is frequently performed today.

The concerto was championed for many years by the noted Czech pianist Rudolf Firkušný, who played it with many different conductors and orchestras around the world before his death in 1994. Once a student of Kurz, Firkušný performed the revised solo part for much of his life, turning towards the original Dvořák score later on in his concert career.

Arranger:
Robert Keller (1828-1891)

Publisher Info.:
Breslau: J. Hainauer, n.d.(ca.1883). Plates J. 2579, 2581 H.

Copyright:
Public Domain

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Great Compositions/Performances: Mendelssohn / Frank Pelleg, 1954: Quartet in B minor for Piano and Strings, Op. 3


[youtube.com/watch?v=dSP9m_FK80o]

Mendelssohn / Frank Pelleg, 1954: Quartet in B minor for Piano and Strings, Op. 3

Frank Pelleg (1910-1968) is joined by Peter Rybar (1913-2002, violin), Heinz Wigand (viola), and Antonio Tusa (cello) — all members of the Winterthur String Quartet — in this 1954 recording of the first movement of the Mendelssohn piano quartet in B minor, Op. 3. I created this video from the LP depicted above, issued on the Concert Hall Society label, serial number E4KP 1420, Concert Hall release H-5.

Movement 1: Allegro molto
Movement 2: Andante
Movement 3: Allegro molto
Movement 4: Finale – Allegro vivace

(Note: Late last year I had uploaded this performance in four separate segments.)

—————————————-­————-
More from Mendelssohn:

Arthur Grumiaux, 1974: Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 – Complete – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LURD7h…

Mendelssohn / Igor Oistrakh: Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 – Movement 1, early 1950s: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Igqdql…
—————————————-­————-

Details about this LP are available at the Library of Congress website here: http://lccn.loc.gov/r54000657

More information about Pelleg here: http://www.doremi.com/pelleg.html

Rybar’s obituary is available for review here:http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2002/o…

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DAVORIN DOLINŠEK and POPV perform LEROY ANDERSON: PIANO CONCERTO IN C (Slovenian premiere!)



Concert of POPV – Symphonic Wind Orchestra of Premogovnik Velenje, 8.12.2012
Conductor: Matjaž Emeršič
Soloist: Davorin Dolinšek

Leroy Anderson: Concert for Piano and Orchestra in C major
Allegro Moderato [Cadenza I: at 7’39”]
Andante-Allegretto (starts at 8’35”)
Allegro Vivo (starts at 14’16”) [Cadenza II: at 18’40”]

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Carl Maria von Weber – Symphony No. 1 in C major, J. 50



John Georgiadis. Queensland Orchestra
Carl Maria von WeberSymphony No. 1 in C major, J. 50
I. Allegro con Fuoco 00:07:56
II. Andante 00:06:20
III. Scherzo and Trio 00:04:06
IV. Finale: Presto 00:06:47

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Great Compositions/Performances: Brahms, Symphony Nr 3 F Dur op 90 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker


From Wikipedia:

The Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90, is a symphony by Johannes Brahms. The work was written in the summer of 1883 at Wiesbaden, nearly six years after he completed his Second Symphony. In the interim Brahms had written some of his greatest works, including the Violin Concerto, two overtures (Tragic Overture and Academic Festival Overture), and the Second Piano Concerto.

The premiere performance was given on 2 December 1883 by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, under the direction of Hans Richter. The shortest of Brahms’ four symphonies, a typical performance lasts between 30 and 40 minutes.

Instrumentation

The symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, a contrabassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombonestimpani, and strings.

Form

The symphony consists of four movements, marked as follows:

  1. Allegro con brio (F major), in sonata form.
  2. Andante (C major), in a modified sonata form.
  3. Poco allegretto (C minor), in ternary form (A B A’).
  4. Allegro (F minor/F major), in a modified sonata form.

History

Hans Richter, who conducted the premiere of the symphony, proclaimed it to be Brahms’ Eroica. The symphony was well received, more so than his Second Symphony. Although Richard Wagner had died earlier that year, the public feud between Brahms and Wagner had not yet subsided. Wagner enthusiasts tried to interfere with the symphony’s premiere, and the conflict between the two factions nearly brought about a duel.[1]

After each performance, Brahms polished his score further, until it was published in May 1884. His friend and influential music critic Eduard Hanslick said, “Many music lovers will prefer the titanic force of the First Symphony; others, the untroubled charm of the Second, but the Third strikes me as being artistically the most nearly perfect.”[1]

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Joshua Bell – Tchaikovsky – Violin Concerto in D major, Op 35



Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Violin Concerto in D major, Op 35

1 Allegro moderato
2 Canzonetta: Andante
3 Finale. Allegro vivacissimo

Joshua Bell, violin

National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America
Valery Gergiev, conductor

Live recording. London, Proms 2013

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Max Bruch – Cancona für Violoncello und Orchester op. 55



Max Bruch (1838-1920) – Cancona für Violoncello und Orchester B-Dur op. 55

Julius Berger – Violoncello
Nationales Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Polen
Antoni Wit – Dirigent

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Make Music Part of Your Life: P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 3 in D major, Op. 29 (Fedoseyev)



Pyotr Ilyich TchaikovskySymphony No. 3 [“Polish”] in D major, Op. 29 (1875)
1. Introduzione e Allegro
2. Alla tedesca. Allegro moderato e semplice
3. Andante elegiaco
4. Scherzo. Allegro vivo
5. Finale. Allegro con fuoco

Moskow Radio Symphony Orchestra
Conductor – Vladimir Fedoseyev
Recorded live at the Alte Oper Frankfurt, 1991

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Fritz Kreisler, Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Caprice viennois, Op. 2 (arr. for piano), Caprice Viennois, Op. 2



Fritz Kreisler
Balazs Szokolay, Szokolay, Balazs
Caprice viennois, Op. 2 (arr. for piano)
Romantic Piano Favourites, Vol. 3
8.550107
http://www.classicsonline.com/catalog…
http://www.naxoslicensing.com/

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Ruggiero RICCI – LALO Violin Concerto Op.20 – L.de Froment, 1977



Edouard LALO: Violin Concerto in F major Op.20 (1873)
0:13 / I. Andante – Allegro [13’29”]
13:42 / II. Andantino [4’34”]
18:16 / III. Allegro con fuoco [6’06”]
Ruggiero Ricci, violin – Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Louis de Froment, conductor (Recorded: June, July 1977 – VOX)

 

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Make Music Part of your Life Series: Ruggiero RICCI at SAINT-SAËNS Havanaise Op.83 – P.Cao, 1972



Camille SAINT-SAËNS: Havanaise, in E Major Op.83 (1887)
Ruggiero RICCI – Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor (Recorded: Hamburg 1972)
________________________________________­__________
SAINT-SAENS, WORKS FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA:
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…
1) Violin Concerto No.2 in C Major Op.58 (1858)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
2) Violin Concerto No.1 in A Major Op.20 -Allegro (1859)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
3) Introduction and Rondo capriccioso, in A Minor Op.28 (1863)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
4) Romance, in C Major Op.48 (1874)
Philharmonia Hungarica – Reinhard Peters, conductor
5) Violin Concerto No.3 in B minor Op.61 (1880)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
6) Violin Concerto No.4 in G major Op.62 ‘Inachevé’ (Morceau de concert) (1880)
Philharmonia Hungarica – Reinhard Peters, conductor
7) Havanaise, in E Major Op.83 (1887)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
8) Caprice Andalous, in G Major Op.122 (1904)
Philharmonia Hungarica – Pierre Cao, conductor
(Ruggiero Ricci, violin / Hamburg, 1972 – (c)&(p) 1990 by VOX)
________________________________________­__________

 

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Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 in G major, Op. 40


[youtube.com/watch?v=L8bcKlEP_Mo]

Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 in G major, Op. 40

Emmy Verhey, Violin. Brabant Orchestra, Eduardo Marturet

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Isaac Stern Plays Dvorak’s Violin Concerto in A minor op. 53, Eugene Ormandy Conduction The Philharmonia Orchestra (the year is 1965)



Great Compositions/Performances: Isaac Stern Plays Dvorak’s Violin Concerto in A minor op. 53, Eugene Ormandy Conduction The Philharmonia Orchestra (the year is 1965)

Isaac Stern

Cover of Isaac SternRelated articles

Eugene Ormandy

Cover of Eugene Ormandy

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Great Composers/Compositions: Vivaldi Violin Concerto in C major, ‘Il piacere’ Op.8 No.6, RV180



Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678 † 1741)
Concerts for the Prince of Poland
Work: Violin Concerto in C major, ‘Il piacere’ Op.8 No.6, RV180

01. Allegro
02. Largo e cantabile
03. Allegro

Andrew Manze, violin & director
Academy of Ancient Music

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  

“Vivaldi” redirects here. For other uses, see Vivaldi (disambiguation).

Antonio Vivaldi in 1725

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (Italian: [anˈtɔːnjo ˈluːtʃo viˈvaldi]; 4 March 1678 – 28 July 1741), nicknamed il Prete Rosso (“The Red Priest”) because of his red hair, was an Italian Baroque composer, Catholic priest, andvirtuoso violinist, born in Venice. Recognized as one of the greatest Baroque composers, his influence during his lifetime was widespread over Europe. Vivaldi is known mainly for composing instrumental concertos, especially for the violin, as well as sacred choral works and over forty operas. His best known work is a series of violin concertos known as The Four Seasons.

Many of his compositions were written for the female music ensemble of the Ospedale della Pietà, a home for abandoned children where Vivaldi had been employed from 1703 to 1715 and from 1723 to 1740. Vivaldi also had some success with stagings of his operas in VeniceMantua and Vienna. After meeting the Emperor Charles VI, Vivaldi moved to Vienna, hoping for preferment. However, the Emperor died soon after Vivaldi’s arrival and Vivaldi himself died less than a year later.

Though Vivaldi’s music was well received during his lifetime, it later declined in popularity until its vigorous revival in the first half of the 20th century. Today, Vivaldi ranks among the most popular and widely recorded of Baroque composers, second only to Johann Sebastian Bach.[1]

 

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Best Classical Music YouTube Collection: Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part II (2/2)


Make this the best post of 2014: RATE, LIKE, COMMENT! Above all ENJOY!

Published on Mar 29, 2013 – 751,382 view to date

A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world. Part II

Compositions name list:

00:00 – Amilcare Ponchielli – Dance of the Hours
05:20 – Bach – Tocata And Fugue In D Minor
12:03 – Beethoven – 5th Symphony (1st movement)
19:08 – Beethoven – 9th Symphony (Ode To Joy)
25:23 – Beethoven – Für Elise (piano version)
28:18 – Carl Orff – O Fortuna (Carmina Burana)
30:57 – Georges Bizet – Habanera
33:06 – Frederic Chopin – Funeral March
38:16 – Delibes – The Flower Duet (Lakmé)
42:49 – Edvard GriegIn the Hall of the Mountain King
45:17 – Franz Liszt – Hungarian Rhapsody No 2 (orchestra version)
55:48 – Georges Bizet – Les Toreadors
58:07 – Händel – Messiah – Hallelujah Chorus
1:02:08 – Mozart – Serenade No 13 (Allegro)
1:07:53 – Offenbach – Can Can
1:10:05 – Rossini – William Tell Overture
1:13:29 Aram Khachaturian – Sabre Dance
1:15:53 – Tchaikovsky – 1812 Overture
1:24:19 – Tchaikovsky – Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy
1:26:48 – Vivaldi – Four Seasons (spring)

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