Tag Archives: vladimir horowitz

historic musical bits: Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)


Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)

historic musical bits: Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)


Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)

Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live): great compositions/performances


Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)

Horowitz plays Debussy L’isle joyeuse,: great compositions/performances


Horowitz plays Debussy L’isle joyeuse

Frédéric Chopin – 24 Études Op. 10 & Op. 25 and 3 Nouvelles Études | Claudio Arrau, piano: make music part of your life series


Frédéric Chopin – 24 Études Op. 10 & Op. 25 and 3 Nouvelles Études | Claudio Arrau, piano

Frédéric Chopin – 12 Études Opp. 10 & 25. 3 Nouvelles Études. (Claudio Arrau, “The Philosopher of the Piano”, 1956) (2007 Digital Remastering)
Recorded: 15-22 & 29.VI. and 5.IX.1956, No.3, Abbey Road Studios, London. First issued in 1957 by Columbia Ltd. Mono/ADD
“Great Recordings of the 20th Century”. EMI Icons, EMI Classics, 2011 & Warner Classics, 2013.

I. Book No.1: 12 Etudes for Piano Op.10, 1830-32.
Before Chopin, there was a tradition of writing studies for the development of keyboard technique, but the pieces were primarily didactic. This set of 12 Études, dedicated to Liszt, represents a new form: concert pieces that serve a secondary function as development of advanced piano skills. Each étude begins with a pattern of pianistic figuration, which creates the specific technical problem for the étude and persists for the duration of the piece. That Chopin was able to create poetry in spite of such controlled and limited means of expression is a testament to his creative genius. The twelve Études published as Chopin’s Opus 10 are an indispensable tool of the modern pianist’s craft: they are a rite of passage that no serious pianist can ignore.
00:00 Nº 1 in C major. Allegro
01:59 Nº 2 in A minor. Allegro
03:23 Nº 3 in E major. Lento ma non troppo (Tritesse – L’intimite) – http://youtu.be/FKDir13g7ow
07:55 Nº 4 in C sharp minor. Presto (Torrent)
10:10 Nº 5 in G flat major. Vivace (Black Keys)
11:55 Nº 6 in E flat minor. Andante
14:49 Nº 7 in C major. Vivace (Toccata)
16:26 Nº 8 in F major. Allegro
18:51 Nº 9 in F minor. Allegro molto agitato
21:00 Nº 10 in A flat major. Vivace assai
23:14 Nº 11 in E flat major. Allegretto
26:17 Nº 12 in C minor. Allegro con fuoco (Revolutionary – Fall of Warsaw)

II. Book No.2: 12 Etudes for Piano Op.25, 1835-37.
This Op.25 collection bears a dedication to Liszt’s mistress, Countess Marie d’Agoult, a writer who used the pseudonym Daniel Stern (the Op.10 Études are dedicated to Franz Liszt). One reason Chopin attempted to capture Liszt’s sympathies with the dedications had to do with the performance design of the pieces in the two sets: each was written to highlight some facet of pianism.
28:57 Nº 1 in A flat major. Allegro sostenuto (Aeolian Harp – Shepherd Boy)
31:21 Nº 2 in F minor. Presto (Balm)
33:05 Nº 3 in F major. Allegro (Carwheel)
35:08 Nº 4 in A minor. Agitato
37:28 Nº 5 in E minor. Vivace
40:52 Nº 6 in G sharp minor. Allegro (Thirds)
43:00 Nº 7 in C sharp minor. Lento (Cello)
48:21 Nº 8 in D flat major. Vivace (Sixths)
49:30 Nº 9 in G flat major. Allegro assai (Butterfly)
50:35 Nº 10 in B minor. Allegro con fuoco
55:04 Nº 11 in A minor. Lento – Allegro con brio (Winter Wind)
58:41 Nº 12 in C minor. Allegro molto con fuoco (Ocean)

III. Trois Nouvelles Études for piano, 1839-40.
Chopin composed this set of etudes for the Méthode des methods, a publication of Ignaz Moscheles, a leading pianist and composer of his day who was not always in agreement with Chopin’s compositional techniques, and François-Joseph Fétis, a now largely forgotten Belgian musicologist.
1:01:26 Nº 1 in F minor
1:03:31 Nº 2 in A flat major
1:05:56 Nº 3 in D flat major

As always with Arrau, the Pianist takes a back seat to Music Making, are a prime example of how myth making regarding Arrau’s Recordings. Arrau approaches Chopin’s Etudes as a genuinely mature musician and sensitive interpreter. In Opus 10, No. 3, for instance, he infuses the music with a deep sadness that recalls its XIX Century title, “La Tristesse.” Incidentally, this record received the Grand Prix du Disque Frédéric Chopin from the Warsaw Chopin Society when it was re-released in 1990.

The 24 Études of Frédéric Chopin (divided into two separate opuses, 10 and 25, but actually composed almost simultaneously) remain the most significant entries in that particular musical genre. Chopin refers, in a letter dating from the fall of 1829, to having written a study “in [his] own manner,” and indeed, a great chasm stands between his achievements and the far drier études of his predecessors (one thinks of Moscheles, Czerny, and Hummel in particular). It was not Chopin’s intent, as it was with many nineteenth-century pianist-composers, to create studies of mere technique and raw dexterity; here, instead, are works with an inexhaustible array of textures, moods, and colors to explore. These are works meant for the concert hall as well as for the practice room

Despite the slightly cramped, airless sonics, Arrau’s characteristically warm and ample sonority makes itself felt in these 1956 recordings. The pianist uncovers layers of depth and disquiet in the slower Études that others merely prettify. The treacherous extensions in the E-Flat Étude, for instance, are distinctly projected and balanced, rather than strummed. Arrau’s spectacularly honest technique enables him to articulate Chopin’s sparkling figurations with a liquid legato unaided by the pedal.

Vladimir Horowitz 1950 / Chopin Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35 “Funeral March”: unique musical moments



From:  ss sabu  ss sabu

Vladimir Horowitz 1950 / Chopin Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35 “Funeral March”

Vladimir Horowitz 1950
Chopin
Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35 “Funeral March”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chopin, 1835

Frédéric Chopin‘s Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35, popularly known as The Funeral March, was completed in 1839 at Nohant, near Châteauroux in France. However, the third movement, whence comes the sonata’s common nickname, had been composed as early as 1837.

The sonata comprises four movements:

  1. Grave – Doppio movimento

  2. Scherzo

  3. Marche funèbre: Lento

  4. Finale: Presto

Funeral march

As noted above, the third movement is structured as a funeral march played with a Lento interlude. While the term “funeral march” is perhaps a fitting description of the 3rd movement, complete with the Lento Interlude in D-flat major, the expression “Chopin’s Funeral March” is used commonly to describe only the funeral march proper (in B-flat minor).

It was transcribed for full orchestra in 1933 by the English composer Sir Edward Elgar (in D minor), and its first performance was at his own memorial concert the next year. It was also transcribed for large orchestra by the conductor Leopold Stokowski; this version was recorded for the first time by Matthias Bamert.

The emotive “funeral march” has become well known in popular culture. It was used at the state funerals of John F. Kennedy, Sir Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher and those of Soviet leaders, including Leonid Brezhnev. It was also played in the funeral of the Spanish poet Miguel Hernández and at thegraveside during Chopin’s own burial at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris.

 

great compositions/performances: Horowitz: Scriabin Etude for piano in minor, Op. 2/1 & Etude for piano in D minor, Op. 8/12


[youtube.com/watch?v=XawgKTDyBcM]

Horowitz: Horowitz in Moscow
7. Alexander Scriabin: Etude for piano in C sharp minor, Op. 2/1
8. Alexander Scriabin: Etude for piano in D sharp minor, Op. 8/12

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Great Compositions/Performances: Vladimir Horowitz – Carmen Variations



Variations on a Theme from “Carmen” by Georges Bizet
Composed and performed by Vladimir Horowitz

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Great Compositions/Performances: Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7



Robert Schumann 
Toccata in C Major, Op.7 
Vladimir Horowitz: piano

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Horowitz plays : Schubert’s Impromptu in G flat major D899 No.3 (in Vienna)


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VLADIMIR HOROWITZ – MASTER OF RACH 3 OPUS 30 [1909]


Sergei Rachmaninoff [1873-1943]

Konzert für Klavier und Orchester Nr. 3 in d-Moll op. 30 

I. Allegro ma non tanto [0:49]
II. Intermezzo: Adagio [17:24]
III. Finale: Alla breve [28:11]

Vladimir Horowitz, Klavier

New York Philharmonic Orchestra 

Zubin Metha, Leitung

Sunday, September 26, 1977

Rachmaninoff’s fatherly insights and advice regarding his own music were to prove invaluable to Horowitz. For Rachmaninoff, Horowitz was a champion of both his solo works and his Third Concerto, about which Rachmaninoff remarked publicly after the performance that “This is the way I always dreamed my concerto should be played, but I never expected to hear it that way on Earth.”

In 1985, in the movie The Last Romantic, Horowitz said: “Rachmaninoff is a pianist. I played with him [Arturo Toscanini, who is also mentioned in the conversation], Rachmaninoff and we… [plays the beginning of 3rd piano concerto]. He was a wonderful pianist and a nice friend. He was my best friend! First of all he was composer, pianist and conductor. Three things at once and first class, all three, I think so.

 

Fabulous Compositions/Great Performances: Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7



Robert Schumann 
Toccata in C Major, Op.7 
Vladimir Horowitz: piano

Horowitz, Schubert Impromptu op. 90 n° 4 in A flat major



Vladimir Horowitz, the last romantic”, 1985 filmed recital in his living room with his wife Wanda Toscanini-Horowitz.

1. Bach-Busoni, Chorale in G minor “Nun Komm der Heiden Heiland
2. Mozart, Sonata in C major K330
3. Schubert, Impromptu op. 90 n° 4 in A flat major
4. Chopin, Mazurka op. 17 n° 4 in A minor
5. Chopin, Scherzo n° 1 in B minor
6. Liszt, Consolation n° 3 in D flat major
7. Rachmaninoff, Prelude op. 32 n° 12 in G sharp minor
8. Schumann, Novelette op. 21 in F major
9. Scriabin, Etude op. 2 n° 1 in C sharp minor
10. Chopin, Polonaise op. 53 in A flat major
11. Chopin, Etude op. 10 n° 5 “Black keys”
12. Moszkowski, Etude in F major
13. Liszt, “Au bord d’une source

 

Emil Gilels spielt Robert Schumann: Arabeske Op. 18



Ort: Moskauer Konservatorium 1977

 

Frederic Chopin Polonaise in A flat Major, Op.40 No.1 “Military” Vladimir Horowitz: piano



Frederic Chopin
Polonaise in A flat Major, Op.40 No.1 “Military”
Vladimir Horowitz: piano

Vladimir Horowitz plays Schumann Humoresque Op. 20 (1/3)



Part 1
Schumann – Humoresque in B flat major, Op. 20
1. Einfach
2. Sehr rasch und leicht
3. Noch rascher
4. Hastig
5. Nach und nach immer lebhafter und starker

Robert Schumann – Kreisleriana opus 16 – Vladimir Horowitz



Robert Schumann
Kreisleriana opus 16
Vladimir Horowitz (1969)
1. Äußerst bewegt 00:00
2. Sehr innig und nicht zu rasch 2:34
3. Sehr aufgeregt 9:36
4. Sehr langsam 13:12
5. Sehr lebhaft 16:31
6. Sehr langsam 19:52
7. Sehr rasch 23:47
8. Schnell und spielend 26:02

Buy “Kreisleriana, Op. 16: 2. Sehr innig und nicht zu rasch” on

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Horowitz plays Schubert: Impromptu in B-flat Major, Op.142/3


The “last Romantic” Vladimir Horowitz plays Schubert’s Impromptu in B-flat Major, Op.142 no. 3 (D.935)
From the Moscow recital (1986)

Today’s Birthday: VLADIMIR SAMOYLOVICH HOROWITZ (1903) – Rachmaninoff 3rd Concerto Mehta NYPO 1978


 

Vladimir Samoylovich Horowitz (1903)

A Russian-American virtuoso pianist, Horowitz made his debut in Russia at 17. Within years, he was touring internationally, with much success. He eventually settled in the US, where his extraordinary technical virtuosity made him one of the most popular pianists of his time. Always susceptible to nervous strain, in 1953 he decided to quit performing publicly. He returned to the stage in 1965 and occasionally thereafter until his death. Why did Horowitz’s father lie about his son’s birthday? More… Discuss

Horowwitz plays the Rachmaninov 3rd Piano Concerto in Avery Fisher Hall, New York, 1978 with Zubin Mehta ( His last recording ever of this concerto and maybe the last time he played it. Horowitz was 75 years old in this recording!!!)