Tag Archives: W. Somerset Maugham

quotation: W. Somerset Maugham


Conscience is the guardian in the individual of the rules which the community has evolved for its own preservation. It is the policeman in all our hearts, set there to watch that we do not break its laws. It is the spy seated in the central stronghold of the ego.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

quotation: “Habits in writing as in life are only useful if they are broken as soon as they cease to be advantageous.” W. Somerset Maugham


Habits in writing as in life are only useful if they are broken as soon as they cease to be advantageous.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

quotation: W. Somerset Maugham


A man marries to have a home, but also because he doesn’t want to be bothered with sex and all that sort of thing.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

quotation: W. Somerset Maugham: “In the country the darkness of night is friendly and familiar, but in a city…”


In the country the darkness of night is friendly and familiar, but in a city, with its blaze of lights, it is unnatural, hostile and menacing. It is like a monstrous vulture that hovers, biding its time.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

QUOTATION: W. Somerset Maugham


The common idea that success spoils people by making them vain, egotistic, and self-complacent is erroneous; on the contrary, it makes them, for the most part, humble, tolerant, and kind. Failure makes people cruel and bitter.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

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Quotation: W. Somerset Maugham


There is nothing so degrading as the constant anxiety about one’s means of livelihood.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

Quotation: W. Somerset Maugham on lack of sympathy for others’ misfortune (quite primitive…indeed)


The world is quickly bored by the recital of misfortune, and willingly avoids the sight of distress.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

“I would think further that preying on people misfortune, is a state of internal and internationally acclaimed pastime for the mongrels of power acquired by any means”

QUotation: W. Somerset Maugham on charm vs. sincerity


Charm and nothing but charm at last grows a little tiresome…It’s a relief then to deal with a man who isn’t quite so delightful but a little more sincere.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965): Concealment (Moon and Sixpence0


No affectation of peculiarity can conceal a commonplace mind.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

Quotation: W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) on Youth


When you are young you take the kindness people show you as your right.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

Who said what and sometimes why: W. Somerset Maugham on guess what? …Yes, Marriage…


Marriage is a very good thing, but I think it’s a mistake to make a habit of it.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

 

Today’s Quotation: W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) on Writing Is a Calling


   We do not write because we want to;
   we write because we have to.

   W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) on Occasional Excess


Excess on occasion is exhilarating. It prevents moderation from acquiring the deadening effect of a habit.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

Today’s Quotation: W. Somerset Maugham on “When pretending catches”


Sometimes people carry to such perfection the mask they have assumed that in due course they actually become the person they seem.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

W. Somerset Maugham – On Human Fate


The rain fell alike upon the just and upon the unjust, and for nothing was there a why and a wherefore.
(From: “Of Human Bondage” (1915)
W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

Quotation Of The Day: April 30, 2011


Life wouldn’t be worth living if I worried over the future as well as the present.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss