Tag Archives: Washington

American voters reject Washington as it is.#uniteblue #BernieSanders— AlterNet (@AlterNet)


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today’s holiday: Aoi Matsuri


Aoi Matsuri

One of the three major festivals of Kyoto, Japan, the Aoi Matsuri, or Hollyhock Festival, is believed to date from the sixth century. The festival’s name derives from the hollyhock leaves adorning the headdresses of the participants; legend says hollyhocks help prevent storms and earthquakes. Today, the festival, which was revived in 1884, consists of a re-creation of the original imperial procession. Some 500 people in ancient costume parade with horses and large lacquered oxcarts carrying the “imperial messengers” from the Kyoto Imperial Palace to the shrines. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Irrigation Festival


Irrigation Festival

The Irrigation Festival is the oldest continuous festival in Washington, held since 1896 in Sequim. Originally known as “May Days,” the festival celebrated the opening of the first ditch to bring water from the Dungeness River to the arid Sequim prairie. In the early days, there were horse races, dancing, a keg of beer hidden in the brush, and tables loaded with food. Today, thousands come for a week of activities: a grand parade, a loggers’ show, a high school operetta, crafts and flower exhibits, dances, music, and the Ditchwalkers Clam and Spaghetti Dinner. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Emancipation Day (Washington, D.C.)


Emancipation Day (Washington, D.C.)

In Washington, DC, April 16th is celebrated as Emancipation Day, commemorating the day in 1862 when President Abraham Lincoln signed into law the District of Columbia Emancipation Act, nine months prior to the Emancipation Proclamation. More than 3,000 slaves were freed under this agreement. Since 2005, the date has been a legal holiday in the District. Events are scheduled throughout the preceding week, and the observance culminates on the 16th in a day of festivities and entertainment, beginning with a parade down Pennsylvania Avenue in the morning. More… Discuss

US President Ronald Reagan Is Shot (1981)


US President Ronald Reagan Is Shot (1981)

Just 69 days into his presidency, Ronald Reagan was shot in Washington, DC, along with three others. The would-be assassin, John Hinckley, Jr., was motivated by an obsession with actress Jodie Foster and the film Taxi Driver. Reagan soon recovered, and Hinckley was found not guilty by reason of insanity and confined to a psychiatric facility. While Reagan was hospitalized, Secretary of State Alexander Haig made a controversial statement about presidential succession. What did he say? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Gallaudet University Students Demand Deaf President (1988)


Gallaudet University Students Demand Deaf President (1988)

When their existing president resigned in 1987, students at Gallaudet University, a liberal arts university for the deaf in Washington, DC, began campaigning for a deaf successor to the post, which had never been held by a deaf person. When the school’s board selected a hearing candidate on March 6, 1988, students began to protest and issued four demands, including the immediate naming of a new deaf president and the resignation of the chair of the board. How many of their demands were met? More… Discuss

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

March 4

1152   Frederick Barbarossa is chosen as emperor and unites the two factions, which emerged in Germany after the death of Henry V.
1461   Henry VI is deposed and the Duke of York is proclaimed King Edward IV.
1634   Samuel Cole opens the first tavern in Boston, Massachusetts.
1766   The British Parliament repeals the Stamp Act, the cause of bitter and violent opposition in the colonies
1789   The first Congress of the United States meets in New York and declares that the Constitution is in effect.
1791   Vermont is admitted as the 14th state. It is the first addition to the original 13 colonies.
1793   George Washington is inaugurated as President for the second time.
1797   Vice-President John Adams, elected President on December 7, to replace George Washington, is sworn in.
1801   Thomas Jefferson becomes the first President to be inaugurated in Washington, D.C.
1813   The Russians fighting against Napoleon reach Berlin. The French garrison evacuates the city without a fight.
1861   The Confederate States of America adopt the “Stars and Bars” flag.
1877   The Russian Imperial Ballet stages the first performance of “Swan Lake” in Moscow.
1901   William McKinley is inaugurated president for the second time. Theodore Roosevelt is inaugurated as vice president.
1904   Russian troops begin to retreat toward the Manchurian border as 100,000 Japanese advance in Korea.
1908   The New York board of education bans the act of whipping students in school.
1912   The French council of war unanimously votes a mandatory three-year military service.
1914   Doctor Fillatre of Paris, France successfully separates Siamese twins.
1921   Warren G. Harding is sworn in as America’s 29th President.
1933   Franklin D. Roosevelt is inaugurated to his first term as president in Washington, D.C.
1944   Berlin is bombed by the American forces for the first time.
1952   North Korea accuses the United nations of using germ warfare.
1963   Six people get the death sentence in Paris plotting to kill President Charles de Gaulle.
1970   Fifty-seven people are killed as the French submarine Eurydice sinks in the Mediterranean Sea.
1975   Queen Elizabeth knights Charlie Chaplin.
1987   President Reagan takes full responsibility for the Iran-Contra affair in a national address.
Born on March 4
1394   Prince Henry the Navigator, sponsor of Portuguese voyages of discovery
1678   Antonio Vivaldi, Italian composer and violinist.
1747   Casimir Pulaski, American Revolutionary War general.
1852   Lady (Isabella Augusta) Gregory, Irish playwright, helped found the Abbey Theatre.
1888   Knute Rockne, football player and coach for Notre Dame.
1901   Charles Goren, world expert on the game of bridge.
1904   Ding Ling, Chinese writer and women’s rights activist.
1928   Alan Sillitoe, novelist (Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner).
1932   Miriam Makeba, South African singer.
1934   Jane Goodall, British anthropologist, known for her work with African chimpanzees.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.6XI5as8V.dpuf

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

March 4

1152   Frederick Barbarossa is chosen as emperor and unites the two factions, which emerged in Germany after the death of Henry V.
1461   Henry VI is deposed and the Duke of York is proclaimed King Edward IV.
1634   Samuel Cole opens the first tavern in Boston, Massachusetts.
1766   The British Parliament repeals the Stamp Act, the cause of bitter and violent opposition in the colonies
1789   The first Congress of the United States meets in New York and declares that the Constitution is in effect.
1791   Vermont is admitted as the 14th state. It is the first addition to the original 13 colonies.
1793   George Washington is inaugurated as President for the second time.
1797   Vice-President John Adams, elected President on December 7, to replace George Washington, is sworn in.
1801   Thomas Jefferson becomes the first President to be inaugurated in Washington, D.C.
1813   The Russians fighting against Napoleon reach Berlin. The French garrison evacuates the city without a fight.
1861   The Confederate States of America adopt the “Stars and Bars” flag.
1877   The Russian Imperial Ballet stages the first performance of “Swan Lake” in Moscow.
1901   William McKinley is inaugurated president for the second time. Theodore Roosevelt is inaugurated as vice president.
1904   Russian troops begin to retreat toward the Manchurian border as 100,000 Japanese advance in Korea.
1908   The New York board of education bans the act of whipping students in school.
1912   The French council of war unanimously votes a mandatory three-year military service.
1914   Doctor Fillatre of Paris, France successfully separates Siamese twins.
1921   Warren G. Harding is sworn in as America’s 29th President.
1933   Franklin D. Roosevelt is inaugurated to his first term as president in Washington, D.C.
1944   Berlin is bombed by the American forces for the first time.
1952   North Korea accuses the United nations of using germ warfare.
1963   Six people get the death sentence in Paris plotting to kill President Charles de Gaulle.
1970   Fifty-seven people are killed as the French submarine Eurydice sinks in the Mediterranean Sea.
1975   Queen Elizabeth knights Charlie Chaplin.
1987   President Reagan takes full responsibility for the Iran-Contra affair in a national address.
Born on March 4
1394   Prince Henry the Navigator, sponsor of Portuguese voyages of discovery
1678   Antonio Vivaldi, Italian composer and violinist.
1747   Casimir Pulaski, American Revolutionary War general.
1852   Lady (Isabella Augusta) Gregory, Irish playwright, helped found the Abbey Theatre.
1888   Knute Rockne, football player and coach for Notre Dame.
1901   Charles Goren, world expert on the game of bridge.
1904   Ding Ling, Chinese writer and women’s rights activist.
1928   Alan Sillitoe, novelist (Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner).
1932   Miriam Makeba, South African singer.
1934   Jane Goodall, British anthropologist, known for her work with African chimpanzees.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.jOb7FTDK.dpuf

today’s image: George Washington


George Washington

George Washington, born February 22, 1732, in Westmoreland County, Virginia, is revered as the ‘Father of His Country’ for the great services he rendered during America’s birth and infancy–a period of nearly 20 years. Well respected by Americans for his military exploits during the Seven Years’ War, Washington commanded the Continental Army that won American independence from Britain in 1783. In 1787, Washington was elected president of the Constitutional Convention that created the form of American democratic government that survives to this day. Washington was also elected in 1787 as the first president of the United States, serving two terms. One of his officers, ‘Light-horse Harry’ Lee, summed up how Americans felt about George Washington: ‘First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen.’ George Washington died at his Mount Vernon home on December 14, 1799, at the age of 67.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.xiQ00YZq.dpuf

today’s birthday: George Washington (1732)


George Washington (1732)

Washington is often called the “Father of his Country” because of the central role he played in the founding of the United States. As commander of the Continental Army, he led colonial forces to victory over the British and served as the new nation’s first president. He then relinquished that power and retired after two terms, thereby setting a key precedent for republican democracy. What other precedent of the US presidency did Washington set? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Babe Ruth (1895)


Babe Ruth (1895)

George Herman Ruth, better known as Babe Ruth, was arguably the greatest player in the history of baseball. His ability to hit home runs helped turn the game into the American national pastime in the 1920s and 30s, and two of his records stood for more than 30 years. In 1936, Babe Ruth became the second player to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. What is the origin of his nickname, “Babe”? More… Discuss

Dvorak – In nature overture op 91 cover by John Constable Paintings, great compositions/performances


Dvorak – In nature overture op 91 cover by John Constable Paintings

Haiku: We all are Charlie, poetic thought by George-B (the smudge and other poems page)


Haiku: We all are Charlie, poetic thought by George-B
(the smudge and other poems page)

We all are Charlie

dawn in and on assignment:

 open people’s hearts!

_______________________________ ________________
– ©George-B (allrightsreserved)

 

 

today’s Image: George Washington Carver (Library of Congress)



George Washington Carver
After devoting his life to helping fellow African Americans through education, George Washington Carver died on January 5, 1943, at Tuskegee, Alabama. Carver was born the son of a slave woman in the early 1860s, went to college in Iowa and then headed to Alabama in 1896. There, at the Tuskegee Institute, Carver served as an agricultural chemist, experimenter, teacher and administrator, working to improve life for African Americans in the rural South by teaching them better agricultural skills. One of the farming methods Carver devised, using peanut and soybean crops to enrich soil depleted by cotton crops, revolutionized Southern farming. Carver became somewhat of a benevolent example of the potential of black intellectuals. He was well-respected by people such as President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Mahatma Gandhi, Josef Stalin and Thomas Edison, whose offer of a job for more than $100 a year Carver refused. Carver worked at Tuskegee until his death.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.kQvgtdYP.dpuf

How did Edgar Alllan Poe Die? (greatest unsolved mysteries)


How did Edgar Alllan Poe Die? (greatest unsolved mysteries)

How did Edgar Alllan Poe Die? (greatest unsolved mysteries)

http://wtop.com/news/2014/07/how-did-edgar-allan-poe-really-die/slide/1/

How did Edgar Allan Poe really die?

this day in the yesteryear: George Washington Resigns as Commander-in-Chief (1783)


George Washington Resigns as Commander-in-Chief (1783)

After demonstrating exemplary leadership as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolution, George Washington resigned his commission and retired to Mount Vernon, Virginia. By resigning his military post, Washington established the important precedent that civilian-elected officials possess ultimate authority over the armed forces. After a brief retirement, he was elected the country’s first president. Why was he given a posthumous military promotion in 1976? More… Discuss

Japanese Cherry Blossoms: YouTube video 1,275,662 in 6 years


Japanese Cherry Blossoms

Ornamental cherry trees and their blossoms are a major symbol of Japan, where they are called sakura and are considered a metaphor for the ephemeral nature of life. As such, they are frequently depicted in art and are associated with both the samurai and kamikaze. In 1912, Japan gave 3,000 sakura as a gift to the US to celebrate the two nations’ growing friendship. These trees have since lined the shore of the Tidal Basin in Washington, DC. What is the practice of hanami? More… Discuss

Sakura “Cherry Blossoms”;Traditional Music of Japan, Classical Koto Music 日本の伝統音楽

Overdue Library Book Returned after 65 Years


Overdue Library Book Returned after 65 Years

A copy of Gone with the Wind has been returned to John R. Rogers High School in Spokane, Washington, after a very long absence. A slip inside the book shows that it was checked out of the school library by Betty Mandershied, one of the school’s students, on January 4, 1949. The book resurfaced this past October in Maine when Wayne Hachey discovered it in his father’s basement. Once Hachey saw that it belonged to the library, he offered to ship it back. In return, the school promised to waive the book’s nearly $500 in late fees. More… Discuss

Il était une bergère (Version playback instrumental) – Mister Toony

This Pressed: Army major general speaks to CNN from inside Ebola quarantine | Follow Ebola


STORY HIGHLIGHTS

American troops who helped fight Ebola in West Africa are under “controlled monitoring” in Italy
The Italian government expressed concern about the troops when they returned to Italy from Liberia
CNN spoke with Maj. Gen. Darryl Williams via a military video conferencing system

Washington (CNN) — They’re just back from the Ebola hot zone, they can’t have any physical contact with family or loved ones and their plastic forks are being burned after each use.

But American troops quarantined in Italy have good morale and are proud of their work against the “silent enemy” of Ebola, according to Major General Darryl Williams, who is being isolated alongside his men at the Army base in Vicenza.

via  Army major general speaks to CNN from inside Ebola quarantine | Follow Ebola.

this pressed for your right to know: The Big Bank Backlash Begins – ProPublica


From left: Robert Khuzami, Obama’s first enforcement director; Linda Chatman Thomsen, who served at the George W. Bush-era S.E.C.; and George Canellos, who just left the Obama S.E.C. (Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images, Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images, Brendan McDermid/Reuters /Landov)

From left: Robert Khuzami, Obama’s first enforcement director; Linda Chatman Thomsen, who served at the George W. Bush-era S.E.C.; and George Canellos, who just left the Obama S.E.C. (Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images, Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images, Brendan McDermid/Reuters /Landov)

Excerpts:  “Last week, I visited an alternate universe. The real world sees a pandemic of bank misconduct, but to the white-collar defense lawyers of Washington, the banks are the victims as they bow beneath the weight of regulators’ remarkably harsh punishments.

I was attending the Securities Enforcement Forum, a gathering of top regulators and white-collar defense worthies. The marquee section was a panel that included Andrew Ceresney, the current S.E.C. enforcement director, and five of his predecessors. Four of those former S.E.C. officials represent corporations at prominent white-collar law firms: Robert S. Khuzami, President Obama’s first enforcement director who now plies his trade at Kirkland & Ellis; Linda Chatman Thomsen, who served at the George W. Bush-era S.E.C. and now works for Davis Polk & Wardwell; William R. McLucas, the longest-serving agency enforcement director who is now at WilmerHale; and George S. Canellos, who just left the Obama S.E.C. to work for Milbank Tweed. (The well-known Stanley Sporkin, who served in the agency in the 1970s, rounded the panel out.)”

via The Big Bank Backlash Begins – ProPublica.

THIS PRESSED for your right to know: Homeland Security braces for flood of immigrants seeking work permits|The Truth23.com


WASHINGTON — The Homeland Security Department appears to be preparing for an increase in the number of immigrants applying for work permits after President Barack Obama announces his long-promised plans for executive actions on immigration reform later this year.

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services confirmed to The Associated Press that it has published a draft contract proposal to buy the card stock needed to make work permits and Permanent Resident Cards, more commonly known as green cards. The proposal calls for providing material for at least 5 million cards a year, with as many as 9 million “during the initial period … to support possible future immigration reform initiative requirements.” The contract calls for as many 34 million cards over five years.

USCIS, the Homeland Security agency that oversees immigration benefits, produces about 3 million work permits and Green Cards annually, so the new contract would at least provide the Obama administration with the flexibility to issue far more work permits or green cards even if it chose not to exercise that option.

USCIS spokesman Christopher Bentley described the proposal posted earlier this month a routine contract solicitation.

“Solicitations of this nature are frequent practice,” Bentley said. He said the number of immigration applications can rise “for any number of any reasons.”

The contract proposal was first reported by the online news site Breitbart.com.

Obama said earlier this year that he would act on his own if Congress failed to pass immigration legislation. He has twice delayed making any changes, saying as recently as last month that he would hold off on executive actions until after November’s midterm elections.

via| Homeland Security braces for flood of immigrants seeking work permits.

today’s birthday: John Willard Marriott (1900)


John Willard Marriott (1900)

A Mormon farm boy from Utah, Marriott left behind the life he knew to open a root beer stand far from home in Washington, DC, in 1927. His gamble quickly paid off. He soon had a chain of family-style drive-ins up and down the US East Coast. In 1957, he opened his first hotel. This too was a great success, and today Marriott International, Inc., is one of the world’s largest hospitality companies. Why did he choose Washington, DC, as the site of his first root beer stand? More… Discuss

todady’s holiday: Patriot Day


Patriot Day

Patriot Day in the United States commemorates the anniversary of the terrorist attacks that took place on September 11, 2001, in New York City, Washington, DC, and in the skies above Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Each year, the president proclaims a day of national observance in memory of the more than 2,700 people who lost their lives in the attacks. Throughout the nation, flags are flown at half-staff, and a moment of silence is observed at 8:46 AM, Eastern time, the exact moment the first plane flew into the North Tower of the World Trade Center. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Ellensburg Rodeo


Ellensburg Rodeo

The Ellensburg Rodeo is the richest rodeo in the state of Washington and also one of the top 25 rodeos of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. Prize money in recent years has been more than $200,000, and an estimated 20,000 people visit Ellensburg on this weekend. Events include a parade and displays of hand crafts, especially weaving and bead work, by the people of the Yakama Indian nation. Yakamas, many in feathered headdress, open each performance of the rodeo with a solemn horseback ride down a steep hill that overlooks the arena. More… Discuss


 

Korean War Veterans Memorial Dedicated (1995)

 

The Korean War Memorial is located on the US National Mall near the Lincoln Memorial and the Reflecting Pool in Washington, DC. Dedicated on the 42nd anniversary of the armistice ending the war, the memorial honors the American men and women who served in the conflict. The memorial is laid out in the form of a triangle intersecting a circle. Within the triangle are 19 statues of military personnel, representing a squad on patrol in the Korean landscape. A granite wall nearby bears what message? More… Discuss

 

The Kennedy Center


The Kennedy Center

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts opened in Washington, DC, in 1971 as a living memorial to its namesake. Designed by architect Edward Durell Stone, the center is surfaced in marble and makes use of the ornamental facade screens for which the architect was known. Its Grand Foyer faces the Potomac River. The cultural complex houses six stages, the largest of which—the Concert Hall—has been designated a national monument. Who ceremoniously broke ground on the Kennedy Center? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Festival of American Folklife


Festival of American Folklife

Since 1967, the Festival of American Folklife has been held on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to celebrate the richness and diversity of American and world cultures, emphasizing folk, tribal, ethnic, and regional traditions in communities throughout the U.S. and abroad. Recent festival programs have included musicians from the former Soviet Union, demonstrations of African-American coil basketry and Italian-American stone-carving, and the performance of a Japanese rice-planting ritual. More… Discuss

today’s holiday…also: Black Music Month (today: DUKE ELLINGTON & His Orchestra Memories Of Duke)


Black Music Month

Black Music Month is observed in June each year in the United States. Created by music executives Kenny Gable and Ed Wright as a way to celebrate and promote black music, the special designation has been proclaimed each year since 1979 by the president. At the White House in Washington, D.C., a concert and reception is held each year that features various genres of African-American music, including R&B, jazz, blues, and hip hop. Throughout the country, public and private organizations host numerous educational programs and cultural festivals recognizing the achievements of black musicians. More… Discuss

01.Satin Doll 02.Black & Tan Fantasy 03.Creole Love Call 04.The Mooche 05.Happy Go Lucky Local 06.Mexican Suite 07.Don’t Mean A Thing 08.I Got It Bad And That Ain’t Good 09.Thing’s Ain’t What They Used To Be 10.Mood Indigo 11.Take The A-Train 12.Sophistic 12.Sophisticated Lady 13.Do Nothing Till You Hear From Me
DUKE ELLINGTON & His Orchestra
Memories Of Duke
130119

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this day in the yesteryear: Lincoln Memorial Dedicated (1922)


Lincoln Memorial Dedicated (1922)

The Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, has been the site of many historic events, including Martin Luther King Jr.’s legendary “I Have a Dream” speech during the 1963 March on Washington. The building, designed by Henry Bacon and styled after a Greek temple, has 36 massive columns, representing the states of the Union at the time of Lincoln’s death. Inside the building is a heroic statue of Abraham Lincoln by Daniel Chester French. On what unit of American currency is the memorial depicted? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: WASHINGTON BECOMES FIRST ELECTED US PRESIDENT (1789)


 

Washington Gold

Washington Gold (Photo credit: Peter Liu Photography)

Washington Becomes First Elected US President (1789)

Washington, who served as commander-in-chief of the Continental army in the American Revolution, was elected the first President of the US after the adoption of the Constitution. His two-term administration was marked by the establishment of a number of key American institutions that continue to operate today. Because of his central role in the founding of the US, Washington is often called the “Father of His Country.” What are five places or institutions that are named after him?More… Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: PAN AMERICAN DAY


Pan American Day

The International Union of American Republics (now called the Pan American Union)—general secretariat of the Organization of American States (OAS)—designated April 14 as Pan American Day in 1930. Although each member country holds its own celebration, it is at the Pan American Union building in Washington, D.C., that one of the largest observances takes place. Students from all over the Western Hemisphere travel to Washington where, against a backdrop of flags in the courtyard of the House of the Americas, they perform folk songs and dances. More… Discuss

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ARTICLE: STARBUCKS


Starbucks

Over the past four decades, Starbucks has become a global phenomenon, transforming the way people—Americans in particular—consume coffee—whether for the better is still a matter of dispute. The first Starbucks store was opened in Seattle, Washington, in 1971 by two teachers and a writer who wanted to sell high-quality coffee beans and machines. It has since grown into a multibillion-dollar corporation with thousands of coffeehouses worldwide. What are the origins of the Starbucks name and logo? More… Discuss

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NEWS: EIGHT DEAD, MORE THAN 100 MISSING FOLLOWING MUDSLIDE


Eight Dead, More Than 100 Missing following Mudslide

Eight bodies have been recovered and more than 100 people are still missing following a mudslide in the US state of Washington that destroyed about 30 homes near the town of Oso on Saturday. The area has had problems with unstable land in the past, but this is the most devastating mudslide it has seen in recent years. Authorities believe recent heavy rain is to blame for the disaster.Search-and-rescue operations are ongoing, but dangerous conditions are hampering the effort. No survivors have been recovered since Saturday.More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE WELLINGTON AVALANCHE (1910)


The Wellington Avalanche (1910)

During a multi-day blizzard in February 1910, a passenger train and a mail train got stuck in Wellington, Washington, high in the Cascade Mountains. Once the snow finally let up, it changed to rain—with tragic consequences. Early on March 1, an avalanche threw the two trains off the tracks and into a valley below, killing 96 people. It was not the only deadly avalanche in the area that year—one struck British Columbia three days later. How did the disaster change railroading in the Cascades? More… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Booker T. Washington


One man cannot hold another man down in the ditch without remaining down in the ditch with him.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Booker T. Washington ABOUT WORK


Nothing ever comes to me, that is worth having, except as the result of hard work.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

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TODAY BIRTHDAY: MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. (1929)


Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929)

King was the inspirational leader of the US Civil Rights Movement. An advocate of nonviolence, he organized boycotts, marches, and demonstrations to protest segregation and racial injustice. In August 1963, he spearheaded the March on Washington, an assembly of more than 200,000 protesters at which he made his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. King’s work helped to assure the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, but he was killed just four years later in Memphis, Tennessee. Why was he there? More… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: 28,800 FLOATING BATH TOYS TOPPLE INTO OCEAN (1992)


28,800 Floating Bath Toys Topple into Ocean (1992)

Children’s bath toys may seem an unlikely source of oceanographic data, but that is just what they have been since 1992, when a shipment of Friendly Floatees from China went rogue while en route to Tacoma, Washington. It all began when 12 shipping containers went overboard during a storm in the Pacific. One broke open, releasing 28,800 toy ducks, beavers, frogs, and turtles into the water. Oceanographer Curtis Ebbesmeyer began tracking their progress after the first Floatees washed ashore where? More… Discuss

 

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Quotation: Booker T. Washington – about nations and slavery


I pity from the bottom of my heart any nation or body of people that is so unfortunate as to get entangled in the net of slavery.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

 

National Geographic Live! : Nalini Nadkarni: For the Love of Trees



National Geographic Live! Nalini Nadkarni: For the Love of Trees
National Geographic grantee and forest ecologist Nalini Nadkarni is known for using nontraditional pathways to raise awareness of nature’s importance to human lives, working with artists, preachers, musicians, and even prisoners.

Upcoming Events at National Geographic Live!
http://events.nationalgeographic.com/…

The National Geographic Live! series brings thought-provoking presentations by today’s leading explorers, scientists, photographers, and performing artists right to your YouTube feed. Each presentation is filmed in front of a live audience at National Geographic headquarters in Washington, D.C. New clips air every Monday.

 

Quotation: Booker T. Washington about oppression


Oppression of the unfortunate makes one weak.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

 

Syria Govenrnment’s: “No evidence has been shown” they are responsible for attack


http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-202_162-57601138/strike-on-syria-may-unleash-more-turmoil-u.n-secretary-general-ban-ki-moon-warns/

Syria gov’t: “No evidence has been shown” they are responsible for attack

September 3, 2013, 12:22 AM

Syrian Deputy Foreign Minister tells CBS NewsElizabeth Palmer that “armed groups” were behind Damascus attack which killed hundreds, and Washington should put forward credible evidence to prove their case that the Syrian government used chemical weapons.

Ralph Nader and Daniel Ellsberg_ We Need to See Courage and Mobilization Here as Well as the Middle East (Democracy Now November 18 2011)


Ralph Nader and Daniel Ellsberg_ We Need to See Courage and Mobilization Here as Well as the Middle East (Democracy Now November 18 2011)
Ralph Nader and Daniel Ellsberg_ We Need to See Courage and Mobilization Here as Well as the Middle East (Democracy Now November 18 2011) (Click here to find out more from Democracy Now)

Exerps from Ralph Nader’ s interview:  “So we have to get over this idea of making the least powerful pay the price for the corporate criminality that started, in the latest stage, from the Wall Street crooks and speculators who looted and drained trillions of dollars of pension funds and mutual fund savings, while they enriched themselves, tanked their companies, their banks, and sent them to Washington to be bailed out by the same workers in their role as taxpayers. It’s really time to raise our level of informed indignation, break our routine, and get involved as voters and citizens at the local, state and national level.”
(Source: http://www.democracynow.org/blog/2011/3/18/nader_and_ellsberg)

CNN: Pepper spray used on demonstrators at Air and Space Museum


Pepper spray used on demonstrators at Air and Space Museum

Pepper spray used on demonstrators at Air and Space Museum (Click on picture to access and read the story at CNN)

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

About Pepper Spray

Pepper spray, also known as OC spray (from “Oleoresin Capsicum“), OC gas, and capsicum spray, is a lachrymatory agent (a chemical compound that irritates the eyes to cause tears, pain, and even temporary blindness) that is used in riot control, crowd control, and personal self-defence, including defence against dogs and bears.[1] Its inflammatory effects cause the eyes to close, taking away vision. This temporary blindness allows officers to more easily restrain subjects and permits persons using pepper spray for self-defense an opportunity to escape.

Although considered a non-lethal agent, it may be deadly in rare cases, and concerns have been raised about a number of deaths where being pepper sprayed may have been a contributing factor.[2]

The active ingredient in pepper spray is capsaicin, which is a chemical derived from the fruit of plants in the Capsicum genus, including chilis. Extraction of oleoresin capsicum from peppers involves finely ground capsicum, from which capsaicin is extracted in an organic solvent such as ethanol. The solvent is then evaporated, and the remaining waxlike resin is the oleoresin capsicum. An emulsifier such as propylene glycol is used to suspend the OC in water, and pressurized to make it aerosol in pepper spray. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method is used to measure the amount of capsaicin and major capsaicinoids within pepper sprays.

A synthetic analogue of capsaicin, pelargonic acid vanillylamide (desmethyldihydrocapsaicin), is used in another version of pepper spray known as PAVA spray which is used in the United Kingdom. Another synthetic counterpart of pepper spray, pelargonic acid morpholide, was developed and is widely used in Russia. Its effectiveness compared to natural pepper spray is unclear.

Pepper spray typically comes in canisters, which are often small enough to be carried or concealed in a pocket or purse. Pepper spray can also be bought concealed in items such as rings. There are also pepper spray projectiles available, which can be fired from a paintball gun. It has been used for years against demonstrators. Many such canisters also contain dyes, either visible or UV-reactive, to mark an attacker’s skin and/or clothing to enhance identification by police.

The word Mace, a registered trademark of Mace Security International, is often used synonymously with pepper spray or tear gas; Mace was one of the original manufacturers of nonlethal security sprays in the US. However, not all of their products can be considered pepper spray.

The European Parliament Scientific and Technological Options Assessment (STOA) published in 1998 “An Appraisal of Technologies of Political Control”[5] with extensive information on pepper spray and tear gas. They write:

The effects of pepper spray are far more severe, including temporary blindness which lasts from 15–30 minutes, a burning sensation of the skin which lasts from 45 to 60 minutes, upper body spasms which force a person to bend forward and uncontrollable coughing making it difficult to breathe or speak for between 3 to 15 minutes.

For those with asthma, taking other drugs, or subject to restraining techniques which restrict the breathing passages, there is a risk of death. The Los Angeles Times has reported at least 61 deaths associated with police use of pepper spray since 1990 in the USA.[6] The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) documented 27 people in police custody who died after exposure to pepper spray in California since 1993.[2][7][8] However, the ACLU report counts any death occurring within hours of exposure to pepper spray. In all 27 cases, the coroners’ report listed other factors as the primary cause of death, though in some cases the use of pepper spray may have been a contributing factor.[2]

The US Army concluded in a 1993 Aberdeen Proving Ground study that pepper spray could cause “[m]utagenic effects, carcinogenic effects, sensitization, cardiovascular and pulmonary toxicity, neurotoxicity, as well as possible human fatalities. There is a risk in using this product on a large and varied population”.[9] However, the pepper spray was widely approved in the US despite the reservations of the US military scientists after it passed FBI tests in 1991. As of 1999, it was in use by more than 2000 public safety agencies. ( Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pepper_spray)