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Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two) sung by Londoner Pat Phillips: old tones never getting old


Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two) sung by Londoner Pat Phillips

 

Today’s Birthday: TOM LEHRER (1928) mathematician and song writer


Tom Lehrer (1928)

Despite being a mathematician who led a long career in academia, Lehrer is best known for the few dozen humorous songs he wrote in the 1950s and 60s. He largely tried to dodge the limelight, but his satirical treatment of serious subjects nevertheless gained him a significant cult following and influenced later performers of parody, like “Weird Al” Yankovic. According to an urban legend—one denied by the man himself—Lehrer gave up political satire after the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to whom? More… Discuss

Lyrics and Chords
If you visit American city
You will find it very pretty
Just two things of which you must beware
Don’t drink the water and don’t breathe the air

/ C G / – C / – F / C GC / 

Pollution, pollution
They got smog and sewage and mud
Turn on your tap
And get hot and cold running crud

/ Am G / F E / F C / G C / 

See the halibuts and the sturgeons
Being wiped out by detergeons
Fish gotta swim and birds gotta fly
But they don’t last long if they try

Pollution, pollution
You can use the latest toothpaste
And then rinse your mouth
With industrial waste

Just go out for a breath of air
And you’ll be ready for Medicare
The city streets are really quite a thrill
If the hoods don’t get you, the monoxide will

Pollution, pollution
Wear a gas mask and a veil
Then you can breathe
Long as you don’t inhale

Lots of things there that you can drink
But stay away from the kitchen sink
The breakfast garbage that you throw in to the bay
They drink as lunch in San José

So go to the city
See the crazy people there
Like lambs to the slaughter
They’re drinking the water
And breathing, cough, the air

/ Am G / F E / FEm CAm FEm CAm / FEm CAm / Dm G C – /
Thomas Andrew “Tom” Lehrer (born April 9, 1928) is an American singer-songwriter, satirist, pianist, and mathematician. He has lectured on mathematics and musical theater. Lehrer is best known for the pithy, humorous songs he recorded in the 1950s and 60s.

His work often parodied popular song forms, notably in “The Elements”, where he sets the names of the chemical elements to the tune of the “Major-General’s Song” from Gilbert and Sullivan’s Pirates of Penzance. Lehrer’s earlier work frequently dealt with trivial subject matter, but he also produced a number of songs dealing with the social and political issues of the day, particularly when he went on to write for the US version of the TV show That Was The Week That Was.
Born in 1928 to a Jewish-American family, Tom Lehrer began studying classical piano music at the age of 7. However, Lehrer was more interested in the popular music of the age. Eventually, his mother found him a popular-music piano teacher.[1] At this early age, he began writing his own show tunes that would eventually help him in his future adventures as a satirical composer/writer in his years at Harvard and beyond.[2]

Before attending college, Lehrer graduated from the Loomis Chaffee School in Windsor, Connecticut. As an undergraduate student at Harvard University, studying mathematics, he began to write comic songs to entertain his friends, including “Fight Fiercely, Harvard” (1945). Those songs later became The Physical Revue, a joking reference to a leading scientific journal, The Physical Review.
Early life

Born in 1928 to a Jewish-American family, Tom Lehrer began studying classical piano music at the age of 7. However, Lehrer was more interested in the popular music of the age. Eventually, his mother found him a popular-music piano teacher.[1] At this early age, he began writing his own show tunes that would eventually help him in his future adventures as a satirical composer/writer in his years at Harvard and beyond. 
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