Tag Archives: West Virginia

today’s holiday: Mother’s Day (United States)


Mother’s Day (United States)

The setting aside of a day each year to honor mothers was the suggestion of Anna M. Jarvis of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, whose own mother had died on May 9, 1906. She held a memorial service and asked those attending to wear white carnations—a gesture that soon became a tradition. By 1914, President Woodrow Wilson had proclaimed a national day in honor of mothers, and some people still wear carnations on the second Sunday in May—pink or red for mothers who are living and white for those who have died. More… Discuss

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today’s birthday: John Brown (1800)


John Brown (1800)

Brown was an American abolitionist who advocated and practiced armed insurrection as a means to abolish all slavery. After murdering five proslavery settlers in Kansas in 1856, Brown led an unsuccessful raid on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, in 1859. He was convicted of treason and hanged. His raid made him a martyr to northern abolitionists and increased the sectional animosities that led to the American Civil War. What future general captured Brown at Harpers Ferry? More… Discuss

today’s picture: Belle Boyd: Confederate Spy (Image: Library of Congress)



Belle Boyd: Confederate Spy

Ardent Confederate Isabelle (Belle) Boyd became one of the Civil War’s most notorious spies. In 1861, when only 16, she fatally wounded a Union soldier who entered her family’s home in Martinsburg, Virginia (now West Virginia). During the next year, she regularly provided intelligence to Rebel commanders. She was arrested several times and twice served sentences in Washington, D.C., prisons. When captured aboard a Confederate blockade-runner in 1864, Belle was banished to Canada. While traveling in England to further the Southern cause, she created a sensation by marrying Sam Hardinge, a Union officer. A widow with one child by war’s end, Boyd published her memoirs, returned to America and later earned a living by acting and lecturing on her wartime experiences.

***Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day?podMonth=1&podDay=16&pod=GO#sthash.5iNamI9h.dpuf

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: LINCOLN’S BIRTHDAY (PRESIDENTS’ DAY)


Lincoln’s Birthday

Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, was born on Feb. 12, 1809. A wreath-laying ceremony and reading of the Gettysburg Address at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., are traditional on Feb. 12. Lincoln’s actual birthday is a legal holiday in 11 states: California, Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, and West Virginia. In most other states, Lincoln’s and George Washington’s birthdays are combined for a legal holiday on the third Monday in February calledPresidents’ DayMore… Discuss

 

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Under the Affordable Care Act, are the uninsured getting insured? | Americans for Prosperity


Under the Affordable Care Act, are the uninsured getting insured? | Americans for Prosperity.

 

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Erin Brockovich: After Chemical Spill, West Virginians Organizing “Stronger Than I’ve Ever Seen” | Democracy Now!



Erin Brockovich: After Chemical Spill, West Virginians Organizing “Stronger Than I’ve Ever Seen” | Democracy Now!
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“The Real McCoy”

“The real McCoy” is an idiom used to mean “the real thing” or “the genuine article,” but who—or what—was McCoy? The origins of the phrase are hazy. It may have originated as a corruption of the Scottish phrase “the real MacKay.” Alternately, it may have been inspired by the infamous Hatfield and McCoy family feud in the late 19th-century US. Still others trace it back to William McCoy, a Prohibition-era rumrunner who reputedly never watered down his liquor. What are other possible explanations? More… Discuss