Tag Archives: wiener philharmoniker

historic musical bits: Leonard Bernstein “Overture König Stephan” Beethoven, Wiener Philharmoniker


Leonard Bernstein “Overture König Stephan” Beethoven

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historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

Happy Mother’s Day! Strauss Sphärenklänge Wien/Vienna 2010


 

 

Strauss Sphärenklänge Wien/Vienna 2010

best classical music: , Amilcare Ponchielli – La danza delle ore / La Danse des heures / Dance of the Hours , make music part of your life series


Amilcare Ponchielli – La danza delle ore / La Danse des heures / Dance of the Hours

Happy Birthday Mozart: Eine kleine Nachtmusik KV 525 Karl Bohm, Wiener Philharmoniker , great compositions/performances


Mozart, Eine kleine Nachtmusik KV 525 Karl Bohm, Wiener Philharmoniker

 

Happy Birthday Mozart: Requiem Mass in D minor (K. 626), Heerbert von Karajan, Wiener Philharmoniker, Wiener Singverein, great compositions/performances


mozart requiem karajan

Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker. , great compositions/performances


Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker

Published on Aug 9, 2013

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

September 8, 1988, Luzern

Sibelius, Symphonie Nr 7 C Dur op 105 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


Sibelius, Symphonie Nr 7 C Dur op 105 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker

Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

(September 8, 1988, Luzern)

Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

September 8, 1988, Luzern

 

 

great compositions/performances: F. Schubert – Symphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 (Harnoncourt)


[youtube.com/watch?v=CnoI-sYtCOU]

F. SchubertSymphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 Conductor – Nikolaus Harnoncourt
Wiener Philharmoniker
Musikvereinssaal Wien

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The symphony has four movements (a performance lasts around 30 minutes.)
  1. Adagio molto – Allegro vivace
  2. Andante in A flat major
  3. Menuetto. Allegro vivace – Trio in E flat major
  4. Allegro

The Symphony No. 4 in C minor, D. 417, commonly called the Tragic (German: Tragische), was composed by Franz Schubert in April 1816.[1] It was completed one year after the Third Symphony, when Schubert was 19 years old. However, the work was premiered only on November 19, 1849, in Leipzig, more than two decades after Schubert’s death.[citation needed]

The title Tragic is Schubert’s own. It was added to the autograph manuscript some time after the work was completed.[1] It is not known exactly why he added the title, but the work is one of only two symphonies (the Unfinished Symphony is the other) which Schubert wrote in a minor key.

The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 4 horns in A-flat, C and E-flat, 2 trumpets in C and E-flat, timpani and strings.

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Historic musical moments: Brahms – Symphony No. 2 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Leonard Bernstein – 1982


[youtube.com/watch?v=n-qMtWVf0NA]

Brahms – Symphony No. 2Wiener PhilharmonikerLeonard Bernstein – 1982

Johannes Brahms
Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 73

I. Allegro non troppo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (00:42)
II. Adagio non troppo – L’istesso tempo, ma grazioso . . . (21:53)
III. Allegretto grazioso (quasi andantino) . . . . . . . . . . . . (34:41)
IV. Finale. Allegro con spirito . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (40:13)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein

Recorded live at the Große Musikvereinssaal
Vienna, 1-6 September 1982

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart: Symphony No.29 – André Previn Wiener Philharmoniker(2000Live)


[youtube.com/watch?v=sXMRimMFV7M]

Mozart: Symphony No.29André Previn Wiener Philharmoniker (2000Live)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
Symphony No.29 in A major, K.201
André Previn
Wiener Philharmoniker
Festspielhaus, Salzburg, 28 1/2000

The Symphony No. 29 in A major, K. 201/186a, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on 6 April 1774.[1] It is, along with Symphony No. 25, one of his better known early symphonies. Stanley Sadie characterizes it as “a landmark … personal in tone, indeed perhaps more individual in its combination of an intimate, chamber music style with a still fiery and impulsive manner.”[2]

Structure

The symphony is scored for 2 oboes, 2 horns and strings, as was typical of early-period Mozart symphonies.

There are four movements:

  1. Allegro moderato, 2/2
  2. Andante, 2/4
  3. Menuetto: Allegretto – Trio, 3/4
  4. Allegro con spirito, 6/8

The first movement is in sonata form, with a graceful principal theme characterized by an octave drop and ambitious horn passages. The second movement is scored for muted strings with limited use of the winds, and is also in sonata form. The third movement, a minuet, is characterized by nervous dotted rhythms and staccato phrases; the trio provides a more graceful contrast. The energetic last movement, another sonata-form movement in 6/8 time, connects back to the first movement with its octave drop in the main theme.

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Great Compositions/Performances: Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker


Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

September 8, 1988, Luzern

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 




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The Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98 by Johannes Brahms is the last of his symphonies. Brahms began working on the piece in Mürzzuschlag. then in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, in 1884, just a year after completing his Symphony No. 3, and completed it in 1885.

Instrumentation

The symphony is scored for two flutes (one doubling on piccolo), two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, contrabassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani, triangle (third movement only), and strings

Reception

The work was given its premiere in Meiningen on October 25, 1885 with Brahms himself conducting. The piece had earlier been given to a small private audience in a version for two pianos, played by Brahms and Ignaz Brüll. Brahms’ friend and biographer Max Kalbeck, reported that the critic Eduard Hanslick, acting as one of the page-turners, exclaimed on hearing the first movement at this performance: “For this whole movement I had the feeling that I was being given a beating by two incredibly intelligent people.”[2] Hanslick later spoke more approvingly of it, however.[citation needed]

Progressive rock group Yes‘ keyboardist Rick Wakeman used part of the symphony on the instrumental “Cans and Brahms” from the 1971 album Fragile

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Great Compositions/Performances: Bernstein – Academic Festival Overture (Brahms)



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Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald op.325 – Johann Strauss II



Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald op.325 (Tales from Vienna Woods). Author: Johann Strauss II (1825-1899).
Conductor: Willi Boskovsky & Wiener Philharmoniker
Picture: Vienna Woods

[La forza del destino] overure – Riccardo Muti, Wiener Philharmoniker



Verdi – La Forza del Destino ‘Overture’ (encore) 

Wiener Philharmoniker 
conducted by RICCARDO MUTI

Live at the Suntory Hall, Tokyo – Oct, 11, 2005.

Hans Knappertsbusch “Funeral march” Götterdämmerung



Siegfried`s funeral march from
Götterdämmerung by Richard Wagner (1813-1883)
Wiener Philharmoniker
Hans Knappertsbusch, conductor
Wien VI.1956

 

Annen-Polka op. 117 – Johann Strauss II



Annen-Polka op 117 from Neujahrskonzert 2009. Author: Johann Strauss II (1825-1899).
Conductor: Daniel Barenboim & Wiener Philharmoniker

George Szell & Wiener Philharmoniker – Orchestra Concert of 1966 Wiener Festwochen


Beautiful music, as it was understood in the 20th century (Gosh it was like yesterday). Not only that, but also the entire video, in good old black  and white, maintaining the air of time long passed …Someday, today will too become part of the historic past as something always happen, each moment to make one thinking about it as… Memorable .

Thank you, friends for returning to my virtual home, and for following, and commenting: You’re always welcome!

 An Orchestra Concert of 1966 Wiener Festwochen on 5th June 1963 in Grossen Musikvereinssaal in Vienna.

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827):
Piano Concerto No.5 in E-flat Major, Op. 73 “Emperor” (Pianist: Friedrich Gulda)
Anton Bruckner (1824-1896):
Symphony No.3 in D Minor, WAB 103

Wiener Philharmoniker
George Szell