Tag Archives: William Shakespeare

word: scruple Definition


scruple

Definition: (noun) An uneasy feeling arising from conscience or principle that tends to hinder action.
Synonyms: misgiving, qualm
Usage: Lady Macbeth is impatient with her husband’s scruples and goads him into killing the king. Discuss.
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Today is Thursday, April 23, the 113th day of 2015. There are 252 days left in the year.


 

SOMEWHERE IN TIME

SOMEWHERE IN TIME

Today is Thursday, April 23, the 113th day of 2015. There are 252 days left in the year.

April 23, 2005

the recently created video-sharing website YouTube uploaded its first clip. Titled “Me at the Zoo,” the video consisted of 18 seconds of YouTube co-founder Jawed Karim standing in front of an elephant enclosure at the San Diego Zoo, commenting on the animals’ “really, really, really long, uh, trunks.” (Today, YouTube claims more than 1 billion users and says that 300 hours of video are uploaded every minute.)

1616

English poet and dramatist William Shakespeare, 52, died on what has been traditionally regarded as the anniversary of his birth in 1564.

1789

President-elect George Washington and his wife, Martha, moved into the first executive mansion, the Franklin House, in New York.

1791

the 15th president of the United States, James Buchanan, was born in Franklin County, Pennsylvania.

1910

former President Theodore Roosevelt delivered his famous “Man in the Arena” speech at the Sorbonne in Paris.

1914

Chicago’s Wrigley Field, then called Weeghman Park, hosted its first major league game as the Chicago Federals defeated the Kansas City Packers 9-1.

1935

Poland adopted a constitution which gave new powers to the presidency.

1940

about 200 people died in the Rhythm Night Club Fire in Natchez, Mississippi.

1954

Hank Aaron of the Milwaukee Braves hit the first of his 755 major-league home runs in a game against the St. Louis Cardinals. (The Braves won, 7-5.)

1965

the Four Tops’ single “I Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch)” was released by Motown.

1985

the Coca-Cola Co. announced it was changing the secret flavor formula for Coke (negative public reaction forced the company to resume selling the original version).

1995

sportscaster Howard Cosell died in New York at age 77.

2007

Boris Yeltsin, the first freely elected Russian president, died in Moscow at age 76.

Ten years ago:

Leaders of China and Japan met in Jakarta, Indonesia, to try to settle their nations’ worst dispute in three decades, but failed to reach an agreement in the bitter feud over Tokyo’s handling of its World War II atrocities. Silvio Berlusconi was sworn in as head of Italy’s 60th postwar government. Renowned British actor Sir John Mills died in Denham, England, at age 97.

Five years ago:

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signed the nation’s toughest illegal immigration law, saying “decades of inaction and misguided policy” had created a “dangerous and unacceptable situation”; opponents said the law would encourage discrimination against Hispanics. The Coast Guard suspended a three-day search for 11 workers missing after an explosion rocked the Deepwater Horizon oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico. Actress Sandra Bullock filed divorce papers in Austin, Texas, to end her five-year marriage to Jesse James.

One year ago:

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal signed a law allowing legally owned guns in bars without restriction and in some churches, schools and government buildings under certain circumstances. Facebook reported its earnings had nearly tripled and revenue had grown sharply in the first quarter, surpassing Wall Street’s expectations. Mark Shand, 62, the brother-in-law of the Prince of Wales and a chairman of an elephant conservation group, died in New York after sustaining a serious head injury in a fall.

Today’s Birthdays:

Actor Alan Oppenheimer is 85. Actor David Birney is 76. Actor Lee Majors is 76. Hockey Hall of Famer Tony Esposito is 72. Irish nationalist Bernadette Devlin McAliskey is 68. Actress Blair Brown is 67. Writer-director Paul Brickman is 66. Actress Joyce DeWitt is 66. Actor James Russo is 62. Filmmaker-author Michael Moore is 61. Actress Judy Davis is 60. Actress Valerie Bertinelli is 55. Actor Craig Sheffer is 55. Actor-comedian-talk show host George Lopez is 54. Rock musician Gen is 51. U.S. Olympic gold medal skier Donna Weinbrecht is 50. Actress Melina Kanakaredes (kah-nah-KAH’-ree-deez) is 48. Rock musician Stan Frazier (Sugar Ray) is 47. Country musician Tim Womack (Sons of the Desert) is 47. Actor Scott Bairstow (BEHR’-stow) is 45. Actor-writer John Lutz is 42. Actor Barry Watson is 41. Rock musician Aaron Dessner (The National) is 39. Rock musician Bryce Dessner (The National) is 39. Actor-writer-comedian John Oliver is 38. Actor Kal Penn is 38. MLB All-Star Andruw Jones is 38. Actress Jaime King is 36. Pop singer Taio Cruz is 32. Actor Aaron Hill is 32. Actor Jesse Lee Soffer is 31. Actress Rachel Skarsten is 30. Singer-songwriter John Fullbright is 27. Tennis player Nicole Vaidisova (vay-deh-SOH’-vuh) is 26. Actor Dev Patel (puh-TEHL’) is 25. Actor Matthew Underwood is 25. Actor Camryn Walling is 25.

Thought for Today:

“In the future everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes.” — Andy Warhol, American pop artist (1928-1987).

Copyright 2015, The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

 

Leonard Bernstein – Maria (from West Side Story) , great compositions/performances


English: Leonard Bernstein, conductor and musi...

English: Leonard Bernstein, conductor and musical director of New York City Symphony Español: Leonard Bernstein, director de orquesta y director musical de la New York City Symphony (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

quotation: Ignorance is the curse of God, Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven. William Shakespeare


Ignorance is the curse of God, Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

Grieg: Peer Gynt, Op. 23 – (IX. In the Hall of the Mountain King): great compositions/performances


Shakespeare’s Sonnets Audiobook by William Shakespeare


Shakespeare’s Sonnets Audiobook by William Shakespeare

read more HERE

The Sonnet


The Sonnet

A sonnet is a poem with 14 lines, invented in 13th-century Italy and perfected by Petrarch. The Italian sonnet is divided into an octave and a sestet. The octave states a problem, and the sestet gives its resolution, with a clear break between the two sections. When the sonnet reached England in the 16th century—chiefly through translations of Petrarch’s works—poets changed its meter, rhyme scheme, and line grouping, creating the Elizabethan sonnet. What is the origin of the term “sonnet”? More… Discuss

Word of the Day: Disciple


Word of the Day

disciple

Definition: (noun) One who embraces and assists in spreading the teachings of another.
Synonyms: adherent
Usage: An avowed disciple of Jonson and his classicism and a greater poet than Fletcher is Robert Herrick, who, indeed, after Shakespeare and Milton, is the finest lyric poet of these two centuries. Discuss.

quotation: A peace is of the nature of a conquest; for then both parties nobly are subdued, and neither party loser. William Shakespeare


A peace is of the nature of a conquest;  for then both parties nobly are subdued, and neither party loser.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

quotation: A jest’s prosperity lies in the ear of him that hears it, Never in the tongue of him that makes it. William Shakespeare


A jest’s prosperity lies in the ear of him that hears it, Never in the tongue of him that makes it.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.2, LGO|Masur (1997), Great compositions/performances,


Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)

quote: The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils. (William Shakespeare)


The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils. The motions of his spirit are dull as night, And his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

quotation: O! beware, my lord, of jealousy; It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock The meat it feeds on. William Shakespeare (1564-1616)


O! beware, my lord, of jealousy; It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock The meat it feeds on.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy – Suite ‘Ein Sommernachtstraum’ / A Midsummer Night’s Dream Op. 61 (Live): make music part of your life series


from:  thiagoblanco:
F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy – Suite ‘Ein Sommernachtstraum’ / A Midsummer Night’s Dream Op. 61 (Live)

Suite – “Ein Sommernachtstraum” op. 61 / Suite – A Midsummer Night’s Dream Op. 61 (Live)

– Overture
– Scherzo
– Intermezzo
– Nocturne
Wedding March

Orchestra: WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln
Conductor: Ton Koopman
Composer: Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809 – 1847)

 

 

make music part of your life series: Leonard Bernstein – Maria (from West Side Story)


[youtube.com/watch?v=kpF1IZ4xLuE]

Leonard Bernstein – Maria (from West Side Story)

Leonard Bernstein (1918 – 1990) was probably best known to the public as the longtime music director of the New York Philharmonic, for conducting concerts by many of the world’s leading orchestras, and for writing the music for West Side Story, a musical based on William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.

quotation: There is nothing like a dream to create the future. Victor Hugo


QUOTATION

There is nothing like a dream to create the future.

Victor Hugo (1802-1885) Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Globe Theatre Burns to the Ground (1613)


Globe Theatre Burns to the Ground (1613)

 

English: The Globe Theatre. The Globe Theatre,...

English: The Globe Theatre. The Globe Theatre, Southwark. This is a reconstruction of the Globe Theatre, made famous by Shakespeare. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The first Globe Theatre was an Elizabethan theatre where several of Shakespeare’s plays were originally staged. It was built around 1598 in London using timber from an earlier theater and was jointly owned by members of the theatrical company to which Shakespeare belonged. The Globe burned down in 1613 during a performance of Henry VIII. It was rebuilt in 1614, but Puritans closed it and all other theaters in 1642, and it was demolished soon after. What caused the fire in 1613? More… Discuss

quotation: “The whirligig of time brings in his revenges.” William Shakespeare


The whirligig of time brings in his revenges.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

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Quotation: William Shakespeare


Men are April when they woo, December when they wed. Maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

QUOTATION: William Shakespeare – “The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.”


The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (1564)


William Shakespeare (1564)

Though his true date of birth remains unknown, the birthday of famed playwright and poet William Shakespeare is traditionally observed on April 23, the same day on which he died 52 years later. Since his death, his plays, such as Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet, have been performed and studied all over the world. Some scholars have speculated that Shakespeare did not write all of the works attributed to him. Who do they suggest was responsible for authoring the Shakespearean canon? More…Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Leonard Bernstein – Maria (from “West Side Story”)


[youtube.com/watch?v=kpF1IZ4xLuE]

Leonard Bernstein – Maria (from “West Side Story”)

Leonard Bernstein (1918 – 1990) was probably best known to the public as the longtime music director of the New York Philharmonic, for conducting concerts by many of the world’s leading orchestras, and for writing the music for West Side Story, a musical based on William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.

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QUOTATION: Miguel de Cervantes


 

Busto de Miguel de Cervantes / Bust of Miguel ...

Busto de Miguel de Cervantes / Bust of Miguel de Cervantes (Photo credit: Lumiago)

Take care, your worship, those things over there are not giants but windmills.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

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QUOTATION: William Shakespeare


Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleeve of care The death of each day’s life, sore labour’s bath Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course, Chief nourisher in life’s feast.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

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ARTICLES: THE TAMING OF THE SHREW


The Taming of the Shrew

The Taming of the Shrew is one of William Shakespeare’s earlier comedies. Its main plot involves the marriage of the violently tempered Katherina to Petruchio, who claims he can tame her wild ways and make her an obedient bride. Though modern scholars bristle at the play’s misogynistic tones, it has inspired films, a Broadway musical, and a Brazilian soap opera. The Taming of the Shrew even sparked a pseudo-sequel by John Fletcher in Shakespeare’s lifetime. What was it called? More… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: IAMBIC PENTAMETER: SHAKESPEARE’S RHYTHM


Iambic Pentameter: Shakespeare’s Rhythm

Shakespeare’s plays are written largely in iambic pentameter, a poetic meter in which each pair of syllables contains an unstressed syllable and a stressed syllable. It creates a rhythm like that of a human heartbeat: lubb-dupp. Strictly speaking, iambic pentameter refers to five iambs in a row, but poets vary their iambic pentameter a great deal. A common departure is the addition of a final unstressed syllable, which Shakespeare uses in one of his most famous lines. Which line is it?More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: William Shakespeare


Friendship is constant in all other things Save in the office and affairs of love.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Felix Mendelssohn – Songs without Words – Op.53, No.1



Felix MendelssohnSongs without Words – Op.53, No.1
András Schiff
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QUOTATION: William Shakespeare


In time we hate that which we often fear.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

Encore: Compositions/Performances: Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)


Great Compositions/Performances:  Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)
Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy:
A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21
Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Kurt Masur, Conductor
Live at Gewandhaus, Leipzig

visit:  http://www.shakespeare-navigators.com/dream/quotesdream.html
for quotes, like the one bellow,  from Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream

So quick bright things come to confusion.—Lysander again speaks to Hermia of the fragility of happiness. (“Confusion” means darkness and destruction.)

Related articles

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Kurt Masur, conducts the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig in Mendelssohn’s ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21’ (1997)


Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy:
A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21

Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Kurt Masur, Conductor
Live at Gewandhaus, Leipzig
Reupload from Lyricholic’s Channel

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Great Performances: Barenboim plays Mendelssohn Songs Without Words Op.30 no.6 in F sharp Minor – Venetian Gondellied


Mendelssohn aged 12 (1821) by Carl Joseph Begas

Mendelssohn aged 12 (1821) by Carl Joseph Begas (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

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Quotation: William Shakespeare about adversity


Sweet are the uses of adversity which, like the toad, ugly and venomous, wears yet a precious jewel in his head.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616):  As You Like It: Act 2, Scene 1
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Discuss>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Prokofiev – Romeo And Juliet – Juliet As A Young Girl (wonderful, expressive composition)



Prokofiev – Romeo And Juliet – Juliet As A Young Girl

 

F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy – Suite ‘Ein Sommernachtstraum’ / A Midsummer Night’s Dream Op. 61


Suite – “Ein Sommernachtstraum” op. 61 / Suite – A Midsummer Night’s Dream Op. 61 

– Overture
– Scherzo
– Intermezzo 
– Nocturne 
Wedding March

Orchestra: WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln
Conductor: Ton Koopman
Composer: Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809 – 1847)

 

THE MERCHANT OF VENICE by William Shakespeare – FULL AudioBook | Greatest Audio Books



THE MERCHANT OF VENICE by William Shakespeare – FULL AudioBook | Greatest Audio Books
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This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org.
This video: Copyright 2013. Greatest Audio Books. All Rights Reserved.

 

Quotation of the Day: Francis Bacon – How to Paradise (on Paradise Lost)


The desire of power in excess caused the angels to fall; the desire of knowledge in excess caused man to fall.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Discuss

My take on this: The Garden of Eden might have been a place of bliss (ignorant of Power and Knowledge.) What good are they both if they displace you from your natural place: The fruits of power and knowledge are deemed to fall out of grace and loose it.

Mel Gibson’s Hamlet:”To Be Or Not To Be”


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Hamlet‘s Third Soliloquy – From Hamlet 3/1 by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) – Performed by Mel Gibson

To be, or not to be: that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, ’tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep;
To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law’s delay,
The insolence of office and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover’d country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pith and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,

And lose the name of action.

 

 

 

 

 

Read more about Hamlet at
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamlet

To This Coda, A Prologue


(“Whereof what’s past is prologue; what to come,
In yours and my discharge.”
William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act 2, scene 1)


To This Coda,  A Prologue 
(by George)

Were this a prologue,
one would find

a body of a story, maybe
a flight of stairs as many as to take one to the Moon
maybe a Phoenix ever so close to The Star Father,
anywhere, closer to margins of the universoid

 or whatever other shape still unknown to word,
still undiscovered,
dreams never dreamed of yet
answers to nonexistent questions:
none of them can break, like real glass…
not before the matter acquires a taste of 
life, death and in-between .


There are no heights unreached

while dreaming, there is no real death
There is no life…This is a lifeless dream.

What doesn’t exist breaks not. 
What doesn’t exist  breaks not.