Tag Archives: World Health Organization

today’s holiday/celebration: Liberia National Unification Day


Liberia National Unification Day

This annual observance in Liberia draws attention to the animosity between the Americo-Liberian elite and the indigenous majority. Under the leadership of President William V. S. Tubman, who led from 1944 to 1971, the divide between these two groups was diminished. Tubman introduced the National Unification Policy, which featured among other things an extension of the vote to women and the country’s indigenous people. The anniversary emerged as a means to draw support for the policy. The day reminds Liberians to remember what they hold in common and not to dwell on how they diverge. More… Discuss

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En Argentina: Hallan hongo que mata al transmisor del dengue y del Chikungunya (Scientists find a fungus that kills the transmitter of dengue and Chikungunya): “Leptolegnia chapmanii”


In Argentina: Hallan fungus that kills the transmitter of dengue and Chikungunya

SALUD | En Argentina

Científicos hallan un hongo que mata al transmisor del dengue y Chikungunya

Un hongo denominado “Leptolegnia chapmanii” puede sobrevivir en aguas turbias o cristalinas de temperaturas variables y es cultivable a bajo costo, por lo que aparece como una prometedora arma para destruir las larvas de los mosquitos transmisores.

EL UNIVERSAL
miércoles 20 de agosto de 2014  04:01 PM

Buenos Aires.- Científicos argentinos hallaron un hongo, adaptable a múltiples hábitat, que destruye las larvas de los mosquitos transmisores del dengue y Chikungunya, dos epidemias virales sin vacunas comerciales y cuyo control se basa en la prevención.

Este hongo, denominado “Leptolegnia chapmanii”, puede sobrevivir en aguas turbias o cristalinas, con distintos PH, a temperaturas variables y es cultivable a bajo costo por lo que aparece como una prometedora arma biológica.

Su poder mortífero probó ser efectivo en larvas de 15 especies de mosquitos, entre ellas las del Aedes Aegypti y Aedes Albopistus, vectores del dengue, una enfermedad viral tropical que puede llegar a ser mortal en su variante hemorrágica y es endémica en muchos países. >>>>>>>>>>more HERE<<<<<<<<<<

Google Translator said:    https://translate.google.com/#auto/en/

HEALTH | In Argentina


Scientists find a fungus that kills the transmitter of dengue and Chikungunya
A fungus called “Leptolegnia chapmaniican survive in cloudy or clear waters of varying temperatures and is cultivated at low cost, so it appears as a promising weapon to destroy the larvae of mosquitoes.
EL UNIVERSAL
Wednesday August 20, 2014 4:01 PM
BUENOS AIRES Argentine scientists have found a fungus, adaptable to multiple habitat, which destroys the larvae of mosquitoes that carry dengue and Chikungunya, two viral epidemics no commercial vaccines and whose control is based on prevention.

This fungus, called “Leptolegnia chapmaniican survive in cloudy or clear waters with varying pH at varying temperatures and is cultivated at low cost so it appears as a promising biological weapon.

Its lethality proved effective in larvae of 15 species of mosquitoes, including Aedes aegypti and Aedes of Albopistus, vectors of dengue, a viral tropical disease that can be fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever and is endemic in many countries.

 

 

Malnutrition a Global Problem


Malnutrition a Global Problem

When we think of malnutrition, we typically think of undernutrition, but in truth the term refers to all types of bad nutrition, including overnutrition. With this definition in mind, a new report finds that malnutrition has become a serious public health issue for every nation in the world, with all but China having already crossed a “malnutrition red line.” Complicating the problem is the fact that about half of the world’s nations are grappling with both undernutrition and overnutrition at the same time. More… Discuss

The Ebola virus The Search for a Cure |BBC Full Documentary 2014 (ignorance, fear, unfounded hope: fight back with knowledge!)


The Ebola virus The Search for a Cure BBC Full Documentary 2014

this pressed: Family of 6 quarantined in Connecticut over Ebola fears


Family of 6 quarantined in Connecticut over Ebola fears. |The Truth24.com

this pressed for your peace of mind: Travelers entering the U.S. from Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia to be monitored for 21 days starting Monday| Lucy Westcott (@lvzwestcott)


thi spressed-for your right to know: Governments seize colloidal silver being used to successfully treat Ebola patients | Starship Earth: The Big Picture


Governments seize colloidal silver being used to successfully treat Ebola patients | Starship Earth:

The Big Picture.

this pressed: WHO, CDC dissect Ebola transmission risk | CIDRAP ( Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy)


Levent Konuk / iStock
A study in a patient-care setting found little Ebola virus persistence in non-bloody samples.

In the wake of suggestions from some experts that the Ebola virus could evolve into an airborne pathogen, the World Health Organization (WHO) took pains to explain today that the virus is known to spread only through contact with bodily fluids—mainly blood, feces, and vomit.

The agency also said that the virus has been detected in breast milk, urine, and semen, and that even saliva and tears may pose some risk.

Meanwhile, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in updated guidance for infection control in hospitals, said the virus can persist on environmental surfaces for a few days. But with daily cleaning and disinfection in a US hospital environment, it would be unlikely to survive longer than a day, the agency said.

via WHO, CDC dissect Ebola transmission risk | CIDRAP.

New Ebola Projections: 1.4 Million Cases by Late January


New Ebola Projections: 1.4 Million Cases by Late January

Last month, the World Health Organization estimated that 20,000 people could contract Ebola by mid-2015, but revised projections now indicate that this number could be reached as early as November. By January, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of infected could rise as high as 1.4 million. New data also indicate that this outbreak is deadlier than previously believed, killing 70 percent of those who contract the illness. More… Discuss

$1 Billion Needed to Fight Ebola (doctors without borders are needed at….borders without doctors)


$1 Billion Needed to Fight Ebola

With the Ebola outbreak in West Africa still uncontained, the UN is increasing its calls for funding in the fight against the epidemic from $100 million just a month ago to $1 billion today. This health crisis, the World Health Organization’s assistant director-general says, is “unparalleled in modern times,” with thousands infected thus far and the number of cases projected to double every three weeks if containment efforts are not stepped up. According to the president of the medical charity Doctors Without Borders, the response to the outbreak has been insufficient thus far and the window of opportunity to contain the outbreak is closing. More… Discuss

Suicide Takes a Life Every 40 Seconds


Suicide Takes a Life Every 40 Seconds

The suicide of beloved actor and comedian Robin Williams last month brought the typically taboo subject to the fore, yet this “major public health problem” is all too often ignored. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), around 800,000 people take their own lives each year. That is about one person every 40 seconds. The introduction of a national suicide prevention strategy has proven effective, but just 28 countries have done so. The WHO is therefore calling on the nations of the world to take action, with the goal of reducing suicide deaths by 10 percent by 2020. More… Discuss

this pressed: BBC News – Ebola outbreak: West Africa food harvests ‘at risk’


BBC News – Ebola outbreak: West Africa food harvests ‘at risk’.

Experimental Ebola Drug Shows Promise


Experimental Ebola Drug Shows Promise

Some good Ebola news is being reported on the heels of the World Health Organization’s projections that the current outbreak could spread to another 10 countries and infect over 20,000 people before it is contained: the experimental drug ZMapp was 100% effective in monkey studies. All of the Ebola-infected monkeys treated with ZMapp survived, even when they received the treatment five days after infection—considered late stage in the animals and equivalent to about nine to 11 days in humans. Still, these results do not mean the drug will be as effective in humans, and, in fact, two of the seven human Ebola patients treated with the drug have nevertheless died. More… Discuss

this pressed from THe Washington Post: Ebola virus has mutated during course of outbreak – The Washington Post


Community portrait of Yambuku, Zaire -- 1976

Community portrait of Yambuku, Zaire — 1976 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Ebola virus virion. Created by CDC mi...

English: Ebola virus virion. Created by CDC microbiologist Cynthia Goldsmith, this colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ebola virus has mutated during course of outbreak – The Washington Post.

 

 

WHO Mulling Experimental Ebola Treatments


WHO Mulling Experimental Ebola Treatments

With the death toll from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa still rapidly rising, the World Health Organization (WHO) is exploring the ethical implications of using an experimental drug to combat the virus. Currently, there are no approved vaccines or medications for Ebola, but a number are under development. One experimental drug has already been used to treat two US aid workers infected in the outbreak, and some of the world’s leading Ebola experts are calling for experimental treatments to be made more widely available given the current crisis. The WHO is to convene a meeting of medical ethicists to examine this issue next week. More… Discuss

Ebola Crisis Deepens


Ebola Crisis Deepens

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has claimed 729 lives in four countries thus far, making it the deadliest and widest ranging such outbreak the world has ever seen. Dozens of healthcare workers have fallen victim, complicating efforts to combat it. Though the disease is outpacing current efforts to contain its spread, the head of the World Health Organization (WHO) still believes that the “unprecedented” outbreak could be stopped if proper steps are taken at both the national and international levels. To this end, a new, $100 million (75 million euro) Ebola response plan is being launched to combat the disease. More… Discuss

WHO Launches Program to Eliminate TB in 33 Rich Countries


WHO Launches Program to Eliminate TB in 33 Rich Countries

The burden of tuberculosis falls most heavily on poor countries, but the World Health Organization is hoping that programs targeting tuberculosis in wealthy nations will serve as a model that harder-hit countries will later be able to implement. Thirty-three rich countries are included in the new plan to reduce the tuberculosis infection rate 10-fold by 2035 and effectively eliminate it by 2050. Currently, these countries see about 155,000 new cases of tuberculosis each year, 10,000 of which prove fatal. More… Discuss

health: “Drastic Action” Needed to Contain Ebola Outbreak in West Africa


“Drastic Action” Needed to Contain Ebola Outbreak in West Africa

The World Health Organization is calling for “drastic action” to contain the outbreak of Ebola currently raging in West Africa. Since the outbreak began four months ago, it has spread from Guinea to nearby Sierra Leone and Liberia, infected more than 600 people, and claimed nearly 400 lives, making it the largest Ebola outbreak in terms of cases, deaths, and geographical spread. Despite the presence of 150 experts, the number of reported cases and deaths is still rising daily, threatening the entire region and beyond. The charity Médecins Sans Frontières, or Doctors Without Borders, says the outbreak is out of control. More… Discuss

Brazil Sewage Tests Positive for Polio


Brazil Sewage Tests Positive for Polio

Air travel has made it easier for people to see the world—and, unfortunately, for infectious agents to hitch a ride along with them. Sewage samples near São Paulo, Brazil, one of the World Cup venues, have tested positive for poliovirus. Brazil has been polio-free since 1989, and the presence of the virus in sewage does not change its status, but it does highlight how easily diseases can be spread from place to place in this day and age. More… Discuss

EUZICASA: 200 DIFFERENT COUNTRIES HAVE VISITED THIS SITE! THANKS TO EVERYONE OF MY VISITORS!


EUZICASA - 200 DIFFERENT COUNTRIE HAVE VISITED THIS SITE

EUZICASA: 200 DIFFERENT COUNTRIES HAVE VISITED THIS SITE! MANY THANKS TO EVERYONE OF MY VISITORS!

 

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Antibiotic Resistance Is Global Threat


Antibiotic Resistance Is Global Threat

The “post-antibiotic era” is bearing down on us, and if we do not make some changes soon, it will only be a matter of time before antibiotics are powerless to protect us from diseases that have been treatable for decades. World Health Organization (WHO) data reveal that antibiotic-resistan t bacteria are now apparent in “every region of the world,” posing a major threat to public health. The WHO is urging governments around the globe to prioritize the development of new lines of antibiotics while at the same time taking steps to slow the progression of resistance. More… Discuss

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Polio Is Global Public Health Emergency


Polio Is Global Public Health Emergency

Recent gains in the fight against polio are at risk of being undone if the international community does not take swift action, says the World Health Organization (WHO). This year is currently on track to see a greater number of polio cases worldwide than last year, with Pakistan, Syria, and Cameroon posing the greatest threat of exporting the virus to other countries, having already spread it to Afghanistan, Iraq, and Equatorial Guinea respectively. The WHO is therefore recommending emergency measures to curtail the spread, including having affected countries vaccinate people planning to travel abroad prior to their departure. More… Discuss

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NEWS: WE NEED TO CLEAR THE AIR


We Need to Clear the Air

Pollution is going to be the death of us. According to World Health Organization estimates, air pollution contributed to the deaths of seven million people in 2012, making it the world’s greatest environmental health risk. The deaths were concentrated most heavily in low- and middle-income countries, primarily in Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific region. Indoor air pollution appears to be a greater threat than outdoor air pollution, contributing to 3.3 million deaths in 2012 compared to 2.6 million for the latter. More… Discuss

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NEWS: AND THEN THERE WERE THREE


And Then There Were Three

It’s official: India is polio-free. Having gone three years without a single new case, India has been certified by the World Health Organization as free of the crippling disease. An incredible achievement in public health, theeradication of polio around much of the globe, and now India, shows just what can be accomplished when governments, healthcare agencies, and people work together toward a common goal. In 1988, when the Global Polio Eradication Initiative was first launched, more than 350,000 people in 125 countries were contracting polio annually. Last year, there were just 406 reported cases, and only three countries now remain polio-endemic. More… Discuss

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NEWS: HALVE YOUR SUGAR INTAKE IF THE WHO KNOWS WHAT’S GOOD FOR YOU


Halve Your Sugar Intake if the WHO Knows What’s Good for You

The World Health Organization (WHO) is recommending that people aim to get no more than five percent of their daily caloric intake from sugar, half the long-standing recommendation of 10 percent. For an adult with a normal body mass index, or BMI, this new recommendation translates to about six teaspoons’ worth of sugar a day. Excess sugar consumption can lead to weight gain and associated health risks, such as heart disease, diabetes, and even certain cancers, as well as dental damageMore… Discuss

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MULTINATIONAL DISEASE PREVENTION AND CONTAINMENT INITIATIVE


Multinational Disease Prevention and Containment Initiative

In our increasingly globalized world, the threat ofepidemics and pandemics looms larger with each passing day. We have seen several outbreaks of dangerous, potentially fatal, contagious illnesses in recent years, some of which spread across borders and even oceans. In an effort to prevent avoidable epidemics, twenty-seven countries jointly launched the Global Health Security Agenda, a multinational initiative to improve the prevention, detection, response to, and containment of infectious disease outbreaks.More… Discuss

 

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Codex Alimentarius Explained



This is from documentary called “Waking Up Canada To The New World Order”
found on http://youtube.com/WakingUpCanada

 

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Nutricide – Criminalizing Natural Health, Vitamins, and Herbs


 

Nutricide – Criminalizing Natural Health, Vitamins, and Herbs

 

WHO

WHO (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

The Codex Alimentarius is a threat to the freedom of people to choose natural healing and alternative medicine and nutrition. Ratified by the World Health Organization, and going into Law in the United States in 2009, the threat to health freedom has never been greater.

This is the first part of a series of talks by Dr. Rima Laibow MD, available on DVD from the Natural Solutions Foundation, an non-profit organization dedicated to educating people about how to stop Codex Alimentarius from taking away our right to freely choose nutritional health.

Natural Solutions Foundation
: Dr. Rima Laibow MD.

 

 

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NEWS: INDIA MARKS THREE YEARS POLIO-FREE


India Marks Three Years Polio-Free

Since 1995, India has spent $2.5 billion on its campaign to eradicate polio, mobilizing millions to stamp out thecrippling disease. Just a few years ago, hundreds of new polio cases were still being reported there each year, but in 2011, there was just one—the country’s last. Three years have passed since polio was last seen in India, and the World Health Organization (WHO) is set to declare the nation polio-free in the coming months. The only countries where polio remains endemic are Afghanistan, Pakistan, and NigeriaMore… Discuss

 

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POSSIBLE POLIO CASES REPORTED IN WAR-TORN SYRIA


Possible Polio Cases Reported in War-Torn Syria

Intense global eradication efforts over the past quarter century have cut polio incidence by more than 99% and eliminated it in much of the world. Today, it remains endemic in only three countries—Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan. However, the ongoing civil war in Syriahas made it impossible to effectively vaccinate much of the population, and now the World Health Organization has received reports of two suspected cases of polio there. Before this possible outbreak, wild poliovirus had not been reported in Syria in 14 years. More… Discuss

 

WATER POLITICS


Water Politics

According to the World Health Organization, each person requires about 5 gallons (20 liters) of water per day to adequately meet drinking and hygiene needs. Yet billions live without sufficient water resources. The Middle East, for instance, shares about 1 percent of the world’s available water among 5 percent of the world’s population, and its major rivers cross international borders. Such discrepancies can lead to conflict. Which Middle Eastern conflicts have been fueled by water politics? More… Discuss

 

DEADLY NEW CORONAVIRUS CAPABLE OF PASSING FROM PERSON TO PERSON


 

CoronavirusDeadly New Coronavirus Capable of Passing from Person to Person

The hospital roommate of a man infected with novel coronavirus (NCoV)—a SARS-related virus first identified last year and already linked to 18 deaths—has contracted the illness himself, intensifying concerns about the virus’s ability to spread from person to person. Thus far, the human-to-human transmission of this virus has been somewhat limited, but given the ease of global travel today, it has managed to spread from the Middle East, where it was first detected, to Germany, the UK, and France. The World Health Organization is therefore advising public health officials to remain vigilant in evaluating and tracking cases of severe acute respiratory infectionMore…Discuss

 

World Health Organisation says has found new SARS-like virus (via Reuters)


 

World Health Organisation says has found new SARS-like virus (From Reuters)

World Health Organisation says has found new SARS-like virus (From Reuters) (click to access report)

(Reuters) – A new virus belonging to the same family as the SARS virus that killed 800 people in 2002 has been identified in Britain in a man who had recently been in Saudi Arabia, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Sunday.  More

 
 
Coronavirus
Virus classification
Group: Group IV ((+)ssRNA)
Order: Nidovirales
Family: Coronaviridae
Genus: Coronavirus
Species: SARS coronavirus

The SARS coronavirus, sometimes shortened to SARS-CoV, is the virus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).[1] On April 16, 2003, following the outbreak of SARS in Asia and secondary cases elsewhere in the world, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a press release stating that the coronavirus identified by a number of laboratories was the official cause of SARS. Samples of the virus are being held in laboratories in New YorkSan FranciscoManilaHong Kong, and Toronto.

On April 12, 2003, scientists working at the Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre in Vancouver, British Columbia finished mapping thegenetic sequence of a coronavirus believed to be linked to SARS. The team was led by Dr. Marco Marra and worked in collaboration with theBritish Columbia Centre for Disease Control and the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg, Manitoba, using samples from infected patients in Toronto. The map, hailed by the WHO as an important step forward in fighting SARS, is shared with scientists worldwide via the GSC website (see below).

Dr. Donald Low of Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto described the discovery as having been made with “unprecedented speed.”[2]

The sequence of the SARS coronavirus has since been confirmed by other independent groups. More

 

WHO SAYS DIESEL EXHAUST DEFINITELY CAUSES CANCER


WHO Says Diesel Exhaust Definitely Causes Cancer

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has concluded that exhaust from diesel engines is definitely a cause oflung cancer in humans. The IARC, which is part of the World Health Organization, had previously labeled diesel exhaust fumes as “probably carcinogenic.” The new label is based on research on workers in high-risk occupations, such as truck driving and mining. Such workers are believed to have a 40 percent higher chance of developing lung cancer. However, the expert panel recommends that everyone avoid exposure to diesel exhaust. More… Discuss

WHO Labels Cell Phones “Possibly Carcinogenic”


WHO Labels Cell Phones “Possibly Carcinogenic”

After reviewing epidemiological studies relating to mobile phone use and to exposure to elec tromagnetic fields in the workplace, the World Health Organization‘s International Agency for Research on Cancer has concluded that current evidence does not establish a strong link between cell phone use and increased risk of a malignant type of brain cancer. However, it also does not rule it out. It has therefore classified the devices as “possibly carcinogenic” and recommends that, until additional research into the long-term effects of heavy mobile phone use provides more definitive data, consumers consider reducing their exposure. More… Discuss