Category Archives: Fitness, running, biking, outdoors

Chilia parintelui Arsenie Boca din Valea Sambetei Ep.2

Chilia parintelui Arsenie Boca din Valea Sambetei Ep.2

Facebook: Tara Fagarasului: Dejani

Click on image to access Facebook Page, “Tara Fagarasului”

Dejani. Ca tot omul din Tara Fagarasului, de 1 Mai, plecam spre poalele muntelui, la iarba verde… respectam protocolul zonei si inlocuim gratarul cu un ceaun vechi, in care aruncam ceva carnita de mistret, pastrata bine din sezonul de iarna, coplesita cu cartofi, ceapa, smantana, un piculet de vin si alte mirodenii… sa te lingi pe deste, nu alta! (bucatar Alex Boeriu – vanator:) ( in proiectul nostru Slow Food Tara Fagarasului ne descopera gusturile de acasa)
— with Ranea Cornel Marian, Alex Boeriu, Marius Schumi and Casa Terra.

Source: Facebook

Translation by Google Translate: Dejani. Like every man in Fagaras, May 1, we go to the mountain, green grass with the Protocol and replace the grill area with an old pot, which take a wild boar, keep well in the winter season, overwhelmed with potatoes, onions, sour cream, a wee bit of wine and other spices you lick enough, nothing else! (chef Alex Boeriu hunter :) (in our project Slow Food Fagaras reveals the tastes of home) with Rane CornelMarian, Alex Boeriu, Marius Schumi and Casa Terra.

Description Dejani, Romania (1).jpg

Description Dejani, Romania (1).jpg 4272 x 2848 | 5294KB

Scuba Diving

Scuba Diving

Deep sea diving is generally performed with the aid of a breathing apparatus. Scuba (an acronym for Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus) is a system that delivers air to the diver at the same pressure exerted by the surrounding water. Most scuba divers limit their descent to about 130 ft (40 m), though certain record setters have reached depths of 300 ft (91 m) or more. At depths beyond 130 ft, nitrogen narcosis may set in; how does this condition impair a diver’s judgment? More… Discuss

word: amylum


Definition: (noun) A complex carbohydrate found chiefly in seeds, fruits, tubers, roots and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice.
Synonyms: starch
Usage: She was on a strict diet and avoided foods with high levels of amylum, sugar, and saturated fat. Discuss.

this day in the yesteryear: Johnny Weissmuller Breaks One-Minute Barrier in 100-Meter Freestyle (1922)

Johnny Weissmuller Breaks One-Minute Barrier in 100-Meter Freestyle (1922)

During the 1920s, Weissmuller earned himself recognition as the best all-around amateur swimmer in the US. In 1922, he broke the world record in the 100-meter freestyle, swimming it in 58.6 seconds, and went on to win gold in that event at the 1924 Summer Olympics. He eventually won 5 Olympic gold medals and set 67 world records before parlaying his celebrity into an acting career. After starring as Tarzan in 12 films between 1932 and 1948, Weissmuller went on to play what comic book adventurer? More… Discuss

Pool parasite can live in chlorine for ten days –

The Centers for Disease Control recommends that swimmers shower before geting in the pool to prevent them from carrying infectious bacteria into the water. Photo: Monkey Business Images/shutterstock

The Centers for Disease Control recommends that swimmers shower before geting in the pool to prevent them from carrying infectious bacteria into the water. Photo: Monkey Business Images/shutterstock

ATLANTA, June 29 (UPI) — The Centers for Disease Control is warning swimmers to shower before going into the pool in order to avoid spreading the chlorine-resistant pathogen cryptosporidium, which has caused several outbreaks in recent years.

While E. coli and norovirus are killed within hours by chemicals used for treating pools, cryptosporidium survives in pools and hot tubs for up to ten days, and can cause gastrointestinal problems such as diarrhea.

“This parasite is extremely chlorine-resistant,” Michele Hlavsa, an epidemiologist at the CDC, told CBS News. “Swimmers bring it into the water when they are sick with diarrhea.”

Researchers reviewed data from 2011 and 2012, finding that 90 outbreaks related to recreational water resulted in at least 1,788 cases, 95 hospitalizations and 1 death, according to the CDC’s study, which is published on its website.

Of the outbreaks, 77 percent of them were in treated bodies of water such as pools and spas.

Cryptosporidium was responsible for 52 percent of the treated water outbreaks, and was also responsible for 54 percent of all the outbreaks cause by infectious pathogens.

“Since 1988, the year that the first U.S. treated recreational water-associated outbreak of Cryptosporidium was detected, the number of these outbreaks reported annually has significantly increased,” researchers wrote in the report.

If contracted, the parasite can be cleared from the body in about two to three weeks, however it can be fatal in a person with a weakened immune system, Hlavasa said.

“With these outbreaks, we see they disproportionately affect young children,” Hlavasa told ABC News. “They’re the ones who can go to a pool and young children tend to carry lots of germs.”

The CDC recommends swimmers shower before entering the pool, not swallow the water, and not urinate or defecate in the water while swimming; swimmers are discouraged from entering pools altogether if they have diarrhea.

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via Pool parasite can live in chlorine for ten days –

8 Simple Ways To Eat Less Sugar

Eating too much sugar is bad for your health. You’ve heard it before. Excessive consumption can increase your risk for obesity, heart disease and a host of other health complicatio sugary sugar giphy

The World Health Organization recommends the average adult consume no more than 25 grams of sugar a day, but exceeding this is all too easy. A single 12-ounce can of Coca-Cola, for instance, packs 39 grams of the stuff. And added sugar sneaks into unsuspecting edibles, like hamburgers and “healthy” Greek yogurts.

Cutting back on your sugar intake is a smart choice, but it’s tough to know where to start. If you’re looking to taper off, start with a few of the tweaks below. Introduce them to your everyday routine, and eventually they’ll turn into a habit.

1. Make over your morning coffee.

The two sugars you routinely put into your cup of joe can add up. Try reducing the amount of sugar you use little by little, and rely on full-fat dairy to provide satisfaction. See if your taste buds respond well to cinnamon; the spice pairs perfectly with coffee’s nutty hints, and is, above all, sugar free.

2. Quit your soda habit.

Diet or regular, drinking any kind of pop promotes weight gain and amplifies sugar cravings. We’ve mentioned that a standard can of Coke contains 39 grams of sugar, enough to fill a person’s daily recommended intake and then some. And even though the diet kind has no sugar marked on its label, it won’t do any good in the war against sugar. According to a study published in the Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, the artificial sweeteners in these drinks lead people to overeat, or overcompensate, for the lack of calories contained in the beverages. Artificial sweeteners don’t offer the same hunger-dampening biological rewards that natural sweeteners do, causing the drinker to seek out something caloric. The sweetness in both diet and non-diet soda prompts side effects similar to addiction, making drinkers crave more sugar.

3. Snack on something healthy before food shopping.

Researchers from Cornell University found that snacking on something nutritious before supermarket shopping, like an apple, can actually encourage shoppers to purchase 25 percent more fruits and vegetables than they normally would. Fewer sugary items in your cart means there will be fewer sugary items at home, and fewer sugary items in your belly.

4. Shop the perimeter of the grocery store.

Now that you’ve had your apple, stick to the outer aisles of the supermarket, where conventional stores place the produce, meat and seafood departments — the foods you should focus on. If you avoid the aisles that contain shelves of near-irresistible sugary sweets, you’ll be less likely to buy them.

5. Find a new favorite condiment.

Ketchup is a miracle flavor, but one of the reasons we all love it so much could be because it contains a whole lot of sugar. The sad reality is that dousing your fries in the red stuff is comparable to pouring a couple sugar packets on top. If you’re already eating fries, consider switching to a condiment with less sugar — like mustard or vinegar — instead.

6. Drink more water.

Are you sure you’re hungry? Thirst and dehydration can often disguise themselves as hunger. To determine whether you’re actually hungry or simply thirsty, drink a cup of water and wait a moment. If you’re feeling good, your body was probably trying to tell you it was parched.

7. Eat the grape, not the raisin.

When given the choice, choose fresh over dried fruit. Dried fruit boasts many of the same benefits of its plumper counterparts, but removing a food’s water content concentrates the amount of sugar and calories per serving. A cup of grapes, for instance, contains 15 grams of sugar and around 60 calories. A cup of raisins contains 98 grams of sugar and nearly 500 calories.

8. Make your own salad dressing.

Even if they taste savory, bottled salad dressings typically contain lots of sugar. Two tablespoons of Kraft’s Tuscan House Italian dressing, for example, contains two grams. This seems pretty minuscule, but chances are you’ll be dousing your greens in a serving way over two measly tablespoons. Making your own dressing at home is incredibly easy — and cheap! — and will help you control how much sugar you’re ingesting when you’re eating something as healthy-seeming as a salad.

via 8 Simple Ways To Eat Less Sugar.

Climb ‘El Capitan’ with Google’s first vertical Street View— Engadget (@engadget) June 24, 2015

#NationalDonutFreeDay: Celebrate your new found health, by eating healthier! Create your health culture!


#NationalDonutFreeDay: Celebrate your new found health, by eating healthier! Create your health culture!Screenshot_2

From the Hill : ON SUMAC TRAIL

From the Hill : ON SUMAC TRAIL

San Gabriel River Bikeway River End Cafe to Liberty Park (Speedified X6)

San Gabriel River Bikeway River End Cafe to Liberty Park (Speedified X6)

Accompany me on a road bike outing: San Gabriel River Bikeway: Destination Seal Beach River End Cafe (SPEEDIFIED X6)

On Peppergrass Trail Heading Southwest

On Peppergrass Trail Heading Southwest

From the Hill : 1000 Yards up un Peppergrass Trail

From the Hill : 1000 Yards up un Peppergrass Trail

Hash tag: #TurnbulCynHikingTrail

Hash tag: #TurnbulCynHikingTrail

One of the best hiking trails in Los Angeles, Turnbul Canyon is now practically beyond access due to extensive parking restriction on Beverly Blvd. Both Greenleaf St. and Turnbull Cyn, (off Beverly) are now, together with the side streets restricted for Parking (without a Permit) These streets are Public roads, so the area is not a residential zoning. In addition, there are no bike lines, and no oppotyyunity to use the Stste funded Recreation area, to maintain health, and fitness, for a population that spends life behind the wheel of a car, everyday.

Instead of creating a real parking facility at Turnbull, For those of us who choose to workout, the city of Whittier decided that not using these parks and recreation facilities is more important!

New at the #Vatican: Palestinian Liberation Organization –> State of Palestine.— Religion NewsService (@RNS) May 13, 2015

Cabbage leaf mustard – Recipes Wiki


Mustard greens

Wikipedia Article About Mustard greens on Wikipedia

The mustards are several plant species in the genus Brassica whose proverbially tiny mustard seeds are used as a spice and, by   grinding and mixing them with water, vinegar or other liquids, are turned into a condiment also known as mustard. The seeds are also pressed to make mustard oil, and the edible leaves can be eaten as mustard greens.

Mild white mustard (Brassica hirta) grows wild in North Africa, the Middle East and Mediterranean Europe and has spread farther by long cultivation; brown or Indian mustard (B. juncea), originally from the foothills of the Himalaya, is grown commercially in the UK, Canada and the US; black mustard (B. nigra) in Argentina, Chile, the US and some European countries. Canada grows 90% of all the mustard seed for the international market.

In addition to the mustards, the genus Brassica also includes cabbages, cauliflower, rapeseed and turnips.

There has been recent research into varieties of mustards that have a high oil content for use in the production of biodiesel, a renewable liquid fuel similar to diesel fuel. The biodiesel made from mustard oil has good cold flow properties and cetane ratings. The leftover meal after pressing out the oil has also been found to be an effective pesticide.

An interesting genetic relationship between many species of mustard have been observed, and is described as the Triangle of U.

via Cabbage leaf mustard – Recipes Wiki.

Brassica juncea
Brassica juncea - Köhler–s Medizinal-Pflanzen-168.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Brassicales
Family: Brassicaceae
Genus: Brassica
Species: B. juncea
Binomial name
Brassica juncea
(L.) Vassiliĭ Matveievitch Czernajew (1796 – 1871)


Pope Francis and the drink of Peace: Yerba Mate | Look South


Ucranian immigrants cropping yerba mate in Tre...

Ucranian immigrants cropping yerba mate in Tres Capones, Misiones, Argentina. House of V. Hnatiuk (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Plantation in Misiones, Argentina.

Plantation in Misiones, Argentina. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)






Pope Francis and the drink of Peace: Yerba Mate


June 21, 2013 · by Look South · in Argentina, South America, Tourism, Tours, Travel. ·


In the midst of political, religious, national, economic or personal problems, there is one thing that unites all Argentines: Mate.

Mate (pronounced máh-teh) despite what many people may say, is NOT in fact a herbal green tea although it is similar to one. Mate is a tea-like drink made from a green-colored jerboa (herb) that is a lot more robust than tea. For Argentines, mate is the very heart of life and is part of their tradition. It is drunk by the old and young, rich and poor, Peronists and Radicals, parents and children, during winter and summer

After years of conflict, Argentina’s President Cristina Kirchner greeted the new Pope Francis with a beautiful mate set – el “mate de la paz” – after which the pope asked her to stay for lunch with “unos mates” to follow”. Rocco Palmo noted on the occasion that: “A longstanding Vatican protocol forbids the Pope being seen consuming anything but the Eucharist”, but this did not stop him being photographed enjoying the drink.

via Pope Francis and the drink of Peace: Yerba Mate | Look South.



Eating healthy is much more expensive than 10%— Fitness Motivation

How to Prepare Gaucho Mate (powdery yerba mate)

How to Prepare Gaucho Mate (powdery yerba mate)

this day in the yesteryear: First Ascent of Shishapangma (1964)

First Ascent of Shishapangma (1964)

Located in south-central Tibet near the border of Nepal, Shishapangma is the fourteenth highest mountain in the world and the lowest of the eight-thousanders—peaks in the Himalayan and Karakoram mountain ranges that exceed a height of 8,000 m (26,247 ft). Scaled in 1964, it was the last eight-thousander to be climbed because China imposed severe travel restrictions on foreigners at the time. It is considered one of the easiest eight-thousanders to summit; nevertheless, how many have died trying? More… Discuss

The History of Auto Racing

The History of Auto Racing

Automobile racing originated in France in 1894, almost immediately after the construction of the first successful petrol-fueled autos, and it appeared in the US the following year. Open-road races were banned in France in 1903, however, after they led to 8 fatalities. Today, there are several different categories of racing. In open-wheel, stock-car, and other types of circuit auto races, flags are displayed to communicate instructions to competitors. What does a black flag signify? More… Discuss

Science of Breath, by Yogi Ramacharaka, pseud. William Atkinson, [1904], at

Science of Breath, by Yogi Ramacharaka, pseud. William Atkinson, [1904], at

p. 8

Chapter II


Life is absolutely dependent upon the act of breathing. “Breath is Life.”

Differ as they may upon details of theory and terminology, the Oriental and the Occidental agree upon these fundamental principles.

To breathe is to live, and without breath there is no life. Not only are the higher animals dependent upon breath for life and health, but even the lower forms of animal life must breathe to live, and plant life is likewise dependent upon the air for continued existence. The infant draws in a long, deep breath, retains it for a moment to extract from it its life-giving properties, and then exhales it in a long wail, and lo! its life upon earth has begun. The old man gives a faint gasp, ceases to breathe, and life is over. From the first faint breath of the infant to the last gasp of the dying man, it is one long story of continued breathing. Life is but a series of breaths.

Breathing may be considered the most important of all of the functions of the body, for, indeed, all the other functions depend upon it. Man may exist some time without eating; a shorter time without drinking; but without breathing his existence may be measured by a few minutes.

And not only is Man dependent upon Breath for life, but he is largely dependent upon correct habits of breathing for continued vitality and freedom from disease. An intelligent control of our breathing power will lengthen our days upon earth by giving us increased vitality and powers of resistance, and, on the

p. 9

other hand, unintelligent and careless breathing will tend to shorten our days, by decreasing our vitality and laying us open to disease.

Man in his normal state had no need of instruction in breathing. Like the lower animal and the child, he breathed naturally and properly, as nature intended him to do, but civilization has changed him in this and other respects. He has contracted improper methods and attitudes of walking, standing and sitting, which have robbed him of his birthright of natural and correct breathing. He has paid a high price for civilization. The savage, to-day, breathes naturally, unless he has been contaminated by the habits of civilized man.

The percentage of civilized men who breathe correctly is quite small, and the result is shown in contracted chests and stooping shoulders, and the terrible increase in diseases of the respiratory organs, including that dread monster, Consumption, “the white scourge.” Eminent authorities have stated that one generation of correct breathers would regenerate the race, and disease would be so rare as to be looked upon as a curiosity. Whether looked at from the standpoint of the Oriental or Occidental, the connection between correct breathing and health is readily seen and explained.

The Occidental teachings show that the physical health depends very materially upon correct breathing. The Oriental teachers not only admit that their Occidental brothers are right, but say that in addition to the physical benefit derived from correct habits of breathing, Man’s mental power, happiness, self-control, clear-sightedness, morals, and even his spiritual growth may be increased by an understanding of the

p. 10

“Science of Breath.” Whole schools of Oriental Philosophy have been founded upon this science, and this knowledge when grasped by the Western races, and by them put to the practical use which is their strong point, will work wonders among them. The theory of the East, wedded to the practice of the West, will produce worthy offspring.

This work will take up the Yogi “Science of Breath,” which includes not only all that is known to the Western physiologist and hygienist, but the occult side of the subject as well. It not only points out the way to physical health along the lines of what Western scientists have termed “deep breathing,” etc., but also goes into the less known phases of the subject, and shows how the Hindu Yogi controls his body, increasing his mental capacity, and develops the spiritual side of his nature by the “Science of Breath.”

The Yogi practices exercises by which he attains control of his body, and is enabled to send to any organ or part an increased flow of vital force or “prana,” thereby strengthening and invigorating the part or organ. He knows all that his Western scientific brother knows about the physiological effect of correct breathing, but he also knows that the air contains more than oxygen and hydrogen and nitrogen, and that something more is accomplished than the mere oxygenating of the blood. He knows something about “prana,” of which his Western brother is ignorant, and he is fully aware of the nature and manner of handling that great principle of energy, and is fully informed as to its effect upon the human body and mind. He knows that by rhythmical breathing one may bring himself into harmonious vibration with

p. 11

nature, and aid in the unfoldment of his latent powers. He knows that by controlled breathing he may not only cure disease in himself and others, but also practically do away with fear and worry and the baser emotions.

To teach these things is the object of this work. We will give in a few chapters concise explanation and instructions, which might be extended into volumes. We hope to awaken the minds of the Western world to the value of the Yogi “Science of Breath.”

today’s birthday: Haile Gebrselassie (1973)

Haile Gebrselassie (1973)

Widely considered one of the greatest distance runners in history, Haile Gebrselassie is an Ethiopian long-distance track and road running athlete. Over the course of his career, he has set more than 20 records and won numerous Olympic and World Championship titles, achieving major competition wins in outdoor, indoor, cross country, and road running races as short as 1,500 meters and as long as full marathons. In 1995, he beat the world record for the 5,000-meter run by how many seconds? More… Discuss

New at EUZICASA: Widget – The University of Sydney – Glycemic Index

The University of Sydney- Glycemic Index

The University of Sydney- Glycemic Index (access website by clicking!)

Measuring the GI

To determine a food’s GI value, measured portions of the food containing 50 grams of available carbohydrate (or 25 grams of available carbohydrate for foods that contain lower amounts of carbohydrate) are fed to 10 healthy people after an overnight fast. Finger-prick blood samples are taken at 15-30 minute intervals over the next two hours. These blood samples are used to construct a blood sugar response curve for the two hour period. The incremental area under the curve (iAUC) is calculated to reflect the total rise in blood glucose levels after eating the test food. The GI value is calculated by dividing the iAUC for the test food by the iAUC for the reference food (same amount of glucose) and multiplying by 100 (see Figure 1). The use of a standard food is essential for reducing the confounding influence of differences in the physical characteristics of the subjects. The average of the GI ratings from all ten subjects is published as the GI for that food.

The GI of foods has important implications for the food industry. Some foods on the Australian market already show their GI rating on the nutrition information panel. Terms such as complex carbohydrates and sugars, which commonly appear on food labels, are now recognised as having little nutritional or physiological significance. The WHO/FAO recommend that these terms be removed and replaced with the total carbohydrate content of the food and its GI value. However, the GI rating of a food must be tested physiologically and only a few centres around the world currently provide a legitimate testing service. The Human Nutrition Unit at the University of Sydney has been at the forefront of glycemic index research for over two decades and has tested hundreds of foods as an integral part of its program. Jennie Brand Miller is the senior author of International Tables of Glycemic Index published by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 1995 and 2002 and by Diabetes Care in 2008.

GI Graph

Buckwheat: A low GI (glycemic Index) healthier choice for your diet


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about a commonly cultivated crop plant. For other uses, see Buckwheat (disambiguation).
Fagopyrum esculentum
Japanese Buckwheat Flower.JPG
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Core eudicots
Order: Caryophyllales
Family: Polygonaceae
Genus: Fagopyrum
Species: F. esculentum
Binomial name
Fagopyrum esculentum
  • Fagopyrum cereale Raf.
  • Fagopyrum dryandrii Fenzl
  • Fagopyrum emarginatum (Roth) Meisn.
  • Fagopyrum emarginatum Moench
  • Fagopyrum fagopyrum (L.) H.Karst. nom. inval.
  • Fagopyrum polygonum Macloskie nom. illeg.
  • Fagopyrum sagittatum Gilib. nom. inval.
  • Fagopyrum sarracenicum Dumort.
  • Fagopyrum vulgare Hill ex Druce nom. inval.
  • Fagopyrum vulgare T.Nees
  • Polygonum emarginatum Roth
  • Polygonum fagopyrum L.

Field of buckwheat in Bumthang (Bhutan)

Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is a plant cultivated for its grain-like seeds, and also used as a cover crop. To distinguish it from a related species, Fagopyrum tataricum that is also cultivated as a grain in the Himalayas, and from the less commonly cultivated Fagopyrum acutatum, it is also known as Japanese buckwheat[2] and silverhull buckwheat.[2]

Despite the name, buckwheat is not related to wheat, as it is not a grass. Instead, buckwheat is related to sorrel, knotweed, and rhubarb. Because its seeds are eaten, it is referred to as a pseudocereal. The cultivation of buckwheat grain declined sharply in the 20th century with the adoption of nitrogen fertilizer that increased the productivity of other staples.


From the top: fine, medium and coarsely cut oats groats (i.e. steel-cut oats) Bottom: Uncut oat groats (Click to access full size image!)

The name ‘buckwheat’ or ‘beech wheat’ comes from its triangular seeds, which resemble the much larger seeds of the beech nut from the beech tree, and the fact that it is used like wheat. The word may be a translation of Middle Dutch boecweite: boec (Modern Dutch beuk), “beech” (see PIE *bhago-) and weite (Mod. Dut. weit), wheat, or may be a native formation on the same model as the Dutch word.[3]


Common buckwheat in flower

The wild ancestor of common buckwheat is F. esculentum ssp.ancestrale. F. homotropicum is interfertile with F. esculentum and the wild forms have a common distribution, in Yunnan. The wild ancestor of tartary buckwheat is F. tataricum ssp. potanini.[4]

Common buckwheat was domesticated and first cultivated in inland Southeast Asia, possibly around 6000 BCE, and from there spread to Central Asia and Tibet, and then to the Middle East and Europe. Domestication most likely took place in the western Yunnan region of China.[5] Buckwheat is documented in Europe in Finland by at least 5300 BCE [6] as a first sign of agriculture and in the Balkans by circa 4000 BCE in the Middle Neolithic. In Russian and Ukrainian buckwheat is called гречка (grechka) meaning of Greek, due to its introduction in the 7th century by the Byzantine Greeks, the same is the case in Russian.

The oldest known remains in China so far date to circa 2600 BCE while buckwheat pollen found in Japan dates from as early as 4000 BCE. It is the world’s highest elevation domesticate, being cultivated in Yunnan on the edge of the Tibetan Plateau or on the Plateau itself. Buckwheat was one of the earliest crops introduced by Europeans to North America. Dispersal around the globe was complete by 2006, when a variety developed in Canada was widely planted in China.

Buckwheat is a short season crop that does well on low-fertility or acidic soils, but the soil must be well drained. Too much fertilizer, especially nitrogen, will reduce yields. In hot climates, it can only be grown by sowing late in the season, so that it will bloom in cooler weather. The presence of pollinators greatly increases the yield. The nectar from buckwheat flower makes a dark-colored honey. Buckwheat is sometimes used as a green manure, as a plant for erosion control, or as wildlife cover and feed.

Agricultural production

Seed and withered flower of buckwheat

The plant has a branching root system with one primary root that reaches deeply into the moist soil.[7] Buckwheat has triangular seeds and produces a flower that is usually white, although can also be pink or yellow.[8] Buckwheat branches freely, as opposed to tillering or producing suckers, causing a more complete adaption to its environment than other cereal crops.[7] The seed hull density is less than that of water, making the hull easy to remove.[8]

Buckwheat is raised for grain where a short season is available, either because it is used as a second crop in the season, or because the climate is limiting. Buckwheat can be a reliable cover crop in summer to fit a small slot of warm season. It establishes quickly, which suppresses summer weeds.[9] Buckwheat has a growing period of only 10–12 weeks[10] and it can be grown in high latitude or northern areas.[11] It grows 30 to 50  inches (75 to 125 cm) tall.[9]

Historical data

A century ago, the Russian Empire was the world leader in buckwheat production.[12] Growing areas in the Russian Empire were estimated at 6.5 million acres (2,600,000 ha), followed by those of France at 0.9 million acres (360,000 ha).[13] In 1970, the Soviet Union grew an estimated 4.5 million acres (1,800,000 ha) of buckwheat. It remains in 2014 a key cereal.[14] Production in China expanded greatly during the 2000s, to rival Russia’s output.

In the northeastern United States, buckwheat was a common crop in the 18th and 19th centuries. Cultivation declined sharply in the 20th century due to the use of nitrogen fertilizer, to which maize and wheat respond strongly. Over 1,000,000 acres (400,000 ha) were harvested in the United States in 1918. By 1954, that had declined to 150,000 acres (61,000 ha), and by 1964, the last year annual production statistics were gathered by USDA, only 50,000 acres (20,000 ha) were grown. However it may benefit from an “explosion in popularity of so-called ancient grains” reported in the years 2009-2014.[15]

Present-day production

FAO world production estimates 2013

Country Area harvested (ha) Production (tonnes)
Russia Russia 905,911 833,936
China China 705,000 733,000
Kazakhstan Kazakhstan 202,008 276,840
Ukraine Ukraine 168,400 179,020
United States USA 77,500 81,000
Poland Poland 70,384 90,874
Japan Japan 61,400 33,400
Brazil Brazil 48,000 62,000
France France 44,500 154,800
Belarus Belarus 31,403 30,353
Lithuania Lithuania 30,500 28,200
Nepal Nepal 10,681 10,056
Tanzania Tanzania 10,500 10,500
Latvia Latvia 9,800 10,800
Bhutan Bhutan 3,000 4,500
South Korea Korea 2,392 1,923
Slovenia Slovenia 1,401 1,052
Czech Republic Czech Republic 1,000 2,400
Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina 633 977
South Africa South Africa 630 250
Estonia Estonia 600 400
Croatia Croatia 190 390
Hungary Hungary 110 110
Georgia (country) Georgia 100 100
Slovakia Slovakia 92 68
Moldova Republic of Moldova 61 40
Kyrgyzstan Kyrgyzstan 26 25

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The Philly Cheesesteak

The Philly Cheesesteak

The Philly Cheesesteak is a sandwich of steak, cheese, and onions that is considered to be a city icon. Responsibility for its invention is claimed by Philadelphia’s Olivieri brothers, who began selling it at their hot dog stand near south Philadelphia’s Italian Market in the 1930s. Today, a number of long-running rival establishments each claim loyal followings, and Philadelphians enthusiastically debate the merits of each shop’s recipe. What types of cheese are commonly used on cheesesteaks? More… Discuss

Blue, White and Green (Nature’s Music)

Blue, White and Green

White clouds, blue skies, all seen through the green branches of the trees, with a background of running breeze through the fresh, green leafage…If we are lucky enough we can just let it fill us with the miracle of nature we take for granted every moment because:
There is nothing to replace it, nothing to act as its surrogate, nothing in waiting, after all this natural creation is destroyed.
Respect and preserve nature, find its meaning keep it clean, as you would your garden…It is your garden!

This insignificant video was taken under a tree along the trail at Turnbull Canyon, yesterday. Enjoy!
This is my personal video: As such it cannot be used by any for profit organization, including any TV station in the USA, or Abroad (this selection does not appear anywhere in the long list…)

Leg muscles of the first perfect 10 in Olympic history, at age 14. Nadia Comaneci.— Classic Pics (@classicepics)

today’s birthday: Chuck Norris (1940) (Chuck Norris vs. Bruce Lee in “The Way of the Dragon”)

Chuck Norris (1940)

Carlos “Chuck” Norris is an American martial artist and action star best known for his titular role on the television series Walker, Texas Ranger. After serving in the US Air Force, Norris became a martial arts champion and an actor, starring in many action films. In 2005, Norris became the subject of an Internet phenomenon known as “Chuck Norris Facts,” which document fictional, often absurdly heroic feats and characteristics about him. Which “fact” is reportedly Norris’s favorite? More… Discuss

Bruce Lee Vs Chuck Norris (Way of the Dragon) Climactic Fight to Death


Article: Quinoa


Quinoa is a tall annual herb whose seeds have provided a staple food for peoples of the higher Andes since pre-Columbian times. In the Inca Empire, where only the potato was more widely grown, quinoa is said to have been sacred. The year’s first furrows were opened ceremoniously with a gold implement. In the US and other non-Andean nations, quinoa is now a popular alternative to rice and other grains for its higher protein content. What is typically removed from freshly harvested quinoa seeds? More… Discuss

this pressed for your HEALTH: BBC News – Male fertility: Losing weight and cancer drugs ‘boost sperm’

Obesity has long been suspected as a factor in male infertility.

Two approaches to boosting obese men’s sperm have been presented at the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society.

The first suggested that obese men who lost weight were more likely get their partners pregnant.

The second found that a cancer drug helped some infertile men have children.

Experts said the approaches were interesting alternatives to IVF and were opening up “real possibilities” for men.

Weight loss is already widely advised for women struggling to conceive and obesity has long been suspected as a factor in male infertility.

A team at the University of Sherbrooke in Canada say they have conducted the first study to help men lose weight and see if it improved the chances of conception.

more…via BBC News – Male fertility: Losing weight and cancer drugs ‘boost sperm’.

Missed opportunities are the greatest cause of regret — Fitness Motivation

today’s birthday: Michael Jordan (1963)

Michael Jordan (1963)

Considered by many to be the greatest basketball player of all time, Michael Jordan ended his career with a regular-season scoring average of 30.1 points per game, the highest in NBA history. He won six NBA championships, was league MVP five times, and earned two Olympic gold medals. Jordan’s mid-air acrobatics and slam dunk skills are legendary and earned him the nickname “Air Jordan.” After retiring from basketball in 1993, Jordan surprised fans by beginning a career in what sport? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Mark Spitz (1950)

Mark Spitz (1950)

During the 1972 Summer Olympic Games in Munich, Germany, Jewish-American swimmer Mark Spitz shot to sporting fame when he captured seven gold medals, a feat unequaled by any other athlete in a single Olympiad until 2008. Spitz also set new world records for each of the events in which he took the gold. Having thus brought his total Olympic medal count up to 11—he had won two gold, one silver, and one bronze in 1968—Spitz retired from competition. What other historic event marked the 1972 Games? More… Discuss

Access Mark Spitz’s official website    HERE

this day in the yesteryear: William G. Morgan Invents Volleyball (1895)

William G. Morgan Invents Volleyball (1895)

William G. Morgan invented volleyball in Holyoke, Massachusetts, just four years after basketball was invented in the neighboring town of Springfield. Morgan, a physical education director, created “Mintonette” for older athletes who wanted to play indoor sports but deemed basketball too rough. The name volleyball came from the nature of the game: “volleying” a ball back and forth over a net. Players can also “spike” the ball and drive it downward into the opponents’ court. What is a “pancake”? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Babe Ruth (1895)

Babe Ruth (1895)

George Herman Ruth, better known as Babe Ruth, was arguably the greatest player in the history of baseball. His ability to hit home runs helped turn the game into the American national pastime in the 1920s and 30s, and two of his records stood for more than 30 years. In 1936, Babe Ruth became the second player to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. What is the origin of his nickname, “Babe”? More… Discuss

today’s birthday; Oscar De La Hoya (1973)

Oscar De La Hoya (1973)

At age 19, De La Hoya made his professional debut in the world of boxing, following in the footsteps of his pugilist grandfather and father. It came hot on the heels of an impressive Olympic performance, where he earned gold for the US Boxing Team, and he quickly made a name for himself as an international superstar. When De La Hoya defeated Felix Sturm in 2004, he became the first boxer in history to win world titles in six different weight divisions. How many punches did he throw in the fight? More… Discuss

this pressed: How Backpacking Can Put You in Touch With Your Inner Saint|National Geographic

Picture of signs along the Appalachian Trail
Picture of signs along the Appalachian Trail

Frequent mileposts break down the roughly 2,200-mile Appalachian Trail, which runs from Georgia to Maine.

Photograph by Michael Melford, National Geographic Creative

via How Backpacking Can Put You in Touch With Your Inner Saint. |National Geographic


The first bicycle, probably created by the German Baron Karl de Drais de Sauerbrun in the early 1800s, was a form of hobby-horse that was propelled by the rider’s feet pushing against the ground. The first treadle-propelled cycle was designed by the Scottish blacksmith Kirkpatrick Macmillan around 1839. By the end of the 19th century, bicycles had wire wheels, metal frames, and pneumatic tires. What did 19th-century suffragists and feminists call the bicycle? More… Discuss

“Search all you want for the answer without, you’ll find it within -George-B”: 12 Hours Sublime Flute Relaxation – Living Mandala Video -Gentle Music – Relax Reading Meditation

12 Hours Sublime Flute Relaxation – Living Mandala Video -Gentle Music – Relax Reading Meditation

because you matter! How poor posture is causing you back pain & ways to treat it !!!!!!!!

today’s birthday: Spiridon Louis (1873)

Spiridon Louis (1873)

Following the decision to revive the Olympic Games at the end of the 19th century, all eyes were on Athens, where the first modern games were held in 1896. Greek competitor Spiridon Louis won the first marathon event of the games and instantly became a national hero. He was first across the finish despite having allegedly taken a break from the race to have a glass of wine at an inn. It helped that some of his competitors collapsed along the way. Why was the third-place finisher disqualified? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Insulin First Used to Treat Diabetes (1922)

Insulin First Used to Treat Diabetes (1922)

Insulin, a hormone produced in clusters of pancreatic cells called islets of Langerhans, regulates carbohydrate metabolism and allows the body to use and store glucose. Patients with diabetes have a decreased ability to either produce or absorb insulin. Canadian physiologists Charles Best and Sir Frederick Banting revolutionized the treatment of diabetes when they discovered how to isolate insulin in 1921. What happened when a 14-year-old diabetic was given the first insulin injection in 1922? More… Discuss

Health-Diets: DASH Diet Rated Best Overall

DASH Diet Rated Best Overall

For the fifth year in a row, US News & World Report has named the DASH diet the best overall diet. DASH—which stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension—is a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products; low in saturated and total fat; low in cholesterol; and high in fiber. DASH was rated by a panel of experts above 34 other diets, including such popular options as Weight Watchers, the Mediterranean diet, and the Paleo diet. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Jackie Robinson Retires (1957)

Jackie Robinson Retires (1957)

Robinson, a vocal member of the Civil Rights movement, was the first African-American baseball player in the modern major leagues and the first African American to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1949, he led the National League in both stolen bases and batting average and was named its most valuable player. In recognition of his accomplishments both on and off the field, Major League Baseball retired Robinson’s number in 1997. How many times did he “steal home” during his career? More… Discuss

Ways To Burn Off Your Favorite Fast Foods — Walter Whitman (perfect timing: after the holidays!!!)

Rattlesnake Hilltop (Turnbull Canyon) Puente Hills, California August 3, 2013

Rattlesnake Hilltop (Turnbull Canyon) Puente Hills, California August 3, 2013

this day in the yesteryear: Roberto Clemente Dies in Plane Crash (1972)

Roberto Clemente Dies in Plane Crash (1972)

Right fielder Roberto Clemente played 18 seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates, winning the National League MVP award in 1966, as well as 12 Gold Glove Awards throughout his career. In 1973, he became the first Latin-American player to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Clemente, who was dedicated to charity work, was traveling to Nicaragua to deliver aid to earthquake victims when his plane crashed off the coast of Puerto Rico. Why did Clemente’s teammate and good friend miss his funeral? More… Discuss

From the BBC: Life choices ‘behind many cancers’

Life choices ‘behind more than four in 10 cancers’

unhealthy habits

Related Stories

More than four in 10 cancers – 600,000 in the UK alone – could be prevented if people led healthier lives, say experts.

Latest figures from Cancer Research UK show smoking is the biggest avoidable risk factor, followed by unhealthy diets.

The charity is urging people to consider their health when making New Year resolutions.

Life choices ‘behind many cancers’