Tag Archives: China

today’s holiday: Frost Saints’ Days


Frost Saints’ Days

These three consecutive days in May mark the feasts of St. Mammertus, St. Pancras, and St. Servatus. In the wine-growing districts of France, a severe cold spell occasionally strikes at this time of year, inflicting serious damage on the grapevines; some in rural France have believed that it is the result of their having offended one of the three saints, who for this reason are called the “frost saints.” French farmers have been known to show their displeasure over a cold snap at this time of year by flogging the statues and defacing the pictures of Mammertus, Pancras, and Servatus. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Kublai Khan Becomes Ruler of the Mongol Empire (1260)


Kublai Khan Becomes Ruler of the Mongol Empire (1260)

The grandson of Genghis Khan, Kublai Khan was a Mongol emperor who founded China’s Yuan Dynasty and became the first Yuan emperor in 1271.    In 1279, he completed his grandfather’s conquest of China by overthrowing the Sung dynasty. He promoted economic prosperity by rebuilding the Grand Canal, repairing public granaries, extending highways, and encouraging foreign commerce. His magnificent capital at Cambuluc—now Beijing—was visited by several Europeans, including what notable figure? More… Discuss

Read more about the expansion of the Mongol (Hordes) empire

this day in the yesteryear: First Ascent of Shishapangma (1964)


First Ascent of Shishapangma (1964)

Located in south-central Tibet near the border of Nepal, Shishapangma is the fourteenth highest mountain in the world and the lowest of the eight-thousanders—peaks in the Himalayan and Karakoram mountain ranges that exceed a height of 8,000 m (26,247 ft). Scaled in 1964, it was the last eight-thousander to be climbed because China imposed severe travel restrictions on foreigners at the time. It is considered one of the easiest eight-thousanders to summit; nevertheless, how many have died trying? More… Discuss

Today’s holiday: Feast of Excited Insects (2015)


Feast of Excited Insects (2015)

Known as Gyeongchip in Korea and as Ching Che in China, the Feast of Excited Insects marks the transition from winter to spring. It is the day when the insects are said to come back to life after hibernating all winter. In China, it is the day when “the dragon raises his head,” summoning the insects back to life, and people perform various rituals designed to prepare for the onslaught. In Korea, this is one of 24 days in the lunar calendar that marks the beginning of a new season. Farmers prepare their fields and begin planting their barley, cabbage, and other vegetables. More… Discuss

China’s version of ‘An Inconvenient Truth’ is going viral— msnbc (@msnbc)


How to meditate for beginners at home (www.ishakriya.com for FULL guided meditation technique)


How to meditate for beginners at home (www.ishakriya.com for FULL guided meditation technique)

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

January 28

28   The Roman Emperor Nerva names Trajan, an army general, as his successor.
1547   Henry VIII of England dies and is succeeded by his nine-year-old son Edward VI.
1757   Ahmed Shah, the first King of Afghanistan, occupies Delhi and annexes the Punjab.
1792   Rebellious slaves in Santo Domingo launch an attack on the city of Cap.
1871   Surrounded by Prussian troops and suffering from famine, the French army in Paris surrenders. During the siege, balloons were used to keep contact with the outside world.
1915   The U.S. Coast Guard is founded to fight contraband trade and aid distressed vessels at sea.
1915   The German navy attacks the U.S. freighter William P. Frye, loaded with wheat for Britain.
1921   Albert Einstein startles Berlin by suggesting the possibility of measuring the universe.
1932   The Japanese attack Shanghai, China, and declare martial law.
1936   A fellow prison inmate slashes infamous kidnapper, Richard Loeb, to death.
1941   French General Charles DeGaulle‘s Free French forces sack south Libya oasis.
1945   Chiang Kai-shek renames the Ledo-Burma Road the Stilwell Road, in honor of General Joseph Stilwell.
1955   The U.S. Congress passes a bill allowing mobilization of troops if China should attack Taiwan.
1964   The Soviets down a U.S. jet over East Germany killing three.
1970   Israeli fighter jets attack the suburbs of Cairo.
1986   The space shuttle Challenger explodes just after liftoff.
Born on January 28
1693   Anna “Ivanovna”, Tsarina of Russia.
1706   John Baskerville, inventor of the “hot-pressing” method of printing.
1853   Jose Marti, Cuban poet and journalist, known as the “Apostle of the Cuban Revolution.”
1912   Jackson Pollock, influential abstract expressionist painter.

today’s holiday: Harbin Ice and Snow Festival (2015)


Harbin Ice and Snow Festival (2015)

This extravaganza of ice sculptures takes place from January 5 through February in the port city of Harbin, the second largest city of northeast China, located in Heilongjiang Province. The sculptures, using themes of ancient legends and stories and modern historic events, depict pavilions, temples, and mythic animals and persons. Located in Zhaolin Park, they shimmer in the sun by day, and at night are illuminated in a rainbow of colors. Theatrical events, art exhibitions, and a photo exhibition mark festival time, and wedding ceremonies are often scheduled in the ice-filled park. More… Discuss

today’s Birthday: King C. Gillette (1855)


King C. Gillette (1855)

Advised to create a product for which there would be constant demand, traveling salesman and inveterate “tinkerer” King C. Gillette secured his place in history with the invention of a safety razor with a disposable blade. The razor was nothing new, but the blade was a groundbreaking innovation. In his first year of production, Gillette sold 51 razors and 168 blades. By the next year, sales had skyrocketed to 90,000 razors and over 12 million blades. How did World War I grow Gillette’s business? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Mao Zedong (1893)


Mao Zedong (1893)

Chairman Mao established the People’s Republic of China in 1949. His Great Leap Forward, an economic plan launched in 1958 to modernize and industrialize China, was an unmitigated disaster that eventually led to the starvation of tens of millions of people. He later launched a movement to eliminate counterrevolutionary elements in the country’s institutions, leading to the destruction of much of China’s cultural heritage and the imprisonment of many Chinese intellectuals. What was it called? More… Discuss

from the Washington Post: When a female mantis is hungry, she fakes fertility to snack on duped mates – The Washington Post


A praying mantis at the Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens in Washington, DC on July 31, 2014. (Photo by Linda Davidson / The Washington Post)

By Rachel Feltman December 23 at 12:35 PM

As you probably know, the female praying mantis will sometimes bite her mate’s head off. It’s not something that the insects make a habit of, exactly — they probably only do it when a male is particularly aggressive, or when the female really needs a nutrient boost in order to successfully lay her eggs.

But when a lady is really hungry, she sometimes throws off fake fertility signals to get a guy into bed. And when that happens, he’s pretty much always on the menu.

via When a female mantis is hungry, she fakes fertility to snack on duped mates – The Washington Post.

I’m watching the latest FRANCE 24 weather forecasthttp://f24.my/app


I’m watching the latest FRANCE 24 weather forecast
http://f24.my/app

Want to know why? Well, because like BBC, they are not so concerned with me  subscribing to their news agency, as they are to providing the news for my knowledge! unlike the LA times, the New York Times, the NBC, ABC, etc, which have taken over the public airwaves and deny access t the news, unless one subscribes (or they allow 5-10 stories /month!) I got an app, weather and newsstand from Google: the shame of any app: it takes for ever to download, but only because of being bloated with commercials, cookies etc.! Same stories, can be accessed and shared directly and very fast, from their news app!

Table Tennis


Article of the Day

Table Tennis

Table tennis originated in 19th-century England and soon spread to several European countries and to the US. In 1926, the International Table Tennis Federation was founded to standardize rules and equipment. The sport won publicity in 1971 when a US team was invited to play in China, thereby initiating the first officially sanctioned Sino-American cultural exchange in almost 20 years. The name “ping pong” is derived from the sound generated in play, as is what other nickname for the sport? More… Discuss

new at #euzicasa: Widget – KINJI SAN-Martial Arts Supplies (Access Here or from the sidebar…your choice!)


KUNJI SAN-Martial Arts Supplies

KUNJI SAN-Martial Arts Supplies (Access here or visit the widget on the sidebar (way down with 100+ others!) they should open all in anew window, but only WPRESS can secure that!  

     新しい#euzicasaアット:ウィジェットKINJI SAN-格闘技用品(アクセスここまたはサイドバー…あなたの選択から!

Please blame (or held in higher respect) Google Translate service @ https://translate.google.com/:
because while you may not agree with all Google is doing, I think many of their initiatives are awesome, and I include Google Translate among those initiatives!
Once you accessed the website, save the page to your browser’s bookmarks, and for easy access place it on the bookmark toolbar! That way it is always in sight and at the tip of your finger! :)

Get back to me with how it worked for you here, by a  welcome comment!: go do it noow, what you’re waiting for!

todayd’s holiday: Burning the Devil


Burning the Devil

La Quema del Diablo takes place in Guatemala. Men dressed as devils chase children through the streets from the start of Advent until December 7, the eve of the Immaculate Conception. On this day, trash fires are lit in the streets of Guatemala City and other towns, and the devils’ reign of terror comes to an end. More… Discuss

Market and fireworks, Chichicastenango

China Adopts its Current Constitution (1982)


China Adopts its Current Constitution (1982)

Adopted under the watchful eye of Deng Xiaoping, China’s de facto leader from 1977 until his death in 1997, the 1982 Constitution of the People’s Republic of China reflects his determination to lay a lasting foundation for domestic stability and modernization within the confines of socialism. It provides a legal framework for the liberalizing economic policies of the 1980s and encourages foreign participation in China’s economy. How many times has it been amended since its adoption? More… Discuss

Ancient Burial Ground Unearthed along Silk Road


Ancient Burial Ground Unearthed along Silk Road

A 1,700-year-old cemetery has been uncovered in the city of Kucha in northwest China on part of the ancient trade route known as the Silk Road. The discovery was made in 2007 and only recently published in an English-language journal. Ten tombs have been excavated at the site, which dates to a time when Kucha was a powerful city-state in the region. The tombs, which were the target of grave robbers in the past, were apparently reused several times. Although the individuals buried there were most likely wealthy citizens, their identities remain a mystery. More… Discuss

American Chinese Food


American Chinese Food

The Chinese immigrants who brought their cuisine to the US in the 19th century soon modified their cooking for Western tastes and ingredients. Today, “American Chinese food” differs greatly from authentic Chinese cuisine. One of the many differences is the types of vegetables used; Chinese cuisine relies on leafy greens like bok choy and gai-lan, while Americanized dishes often feature more readily available produce like broccoli and carrots. What is the origin of the fortune cookie? More… Discuss

this pressed for the environmental health: Mounting Electronic Waste Poses Major Threat to Environment, Health


Mounting Electronic Waste Poses Major Threat to Environment, Health

By Lauren Walker 11/28/14 at 1:32 PM
E-waste

E-waste

An employee arranges discarded computers at a newly opened electronic waste recycling factory in Wuhan, Hubei province. Stringer/ REUTERS

 

Filed Under: Tech & Science, Technology, Electronics, e-waste, Black Friday, Environment, Pollution

Excerpts: “…While the fact that 95.5 million Americans said they would shop on Black Friday is good news for retailers, it is a far less positive figure for the environment. Cheap electronics are one of the biggest draws for shoppers on the day (and indeed the rest of the year), but these immediate savings hide the ultimate collective cost – old electronics (e-waste) that are improperly disposed can result in environmental pollution with its attendant health risks, as well as data theft.

In 2012, the world amassed almost 49 million metric tons of e-waste, including everything from last generation cellphones and laptops to televisions and…”

via Mounting Electronic Waste Poses Major Threat to Environment, Health.

36 Million Slaves Worldwide


36 Million Slaves Worldwide

Slavery may seem like a relic of the past, but in fact 0.5 percent of the world’s population—36 million people—are currently enslaved. The survey, by anti-slavery group Walk Free, identifies as slaves those subjected to forced labor, debt bondage, trafficking, sexual exploitation for money, and forced or servile marriage. India hosts the greatest number of slaves of any country, with 14 million, followed by China, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, and then Russia. Mauritania, meanwhile, has the ignominious distinction of having the highest percentage of slaves, at 4 percent of its population. More… Discuss

Malnutrition a Global Problem


Malnutrition a Global Problem

When we think of malnutrition, we typically think of undernutrition, but in truth the term refers to all types of bad nutrition, including overnutrition. With this definition in mind, a new report finds that malnutrition has become a serious public health issue for every nation in the world, with all but China having already crossed a “malnutrition red line.” Complicating the problem is the fact that about half of the world’s nations are grappling with both undernutrition and overnutrition at the same time. More… Discuss

Is it OK to leave objects on the Moon?


 

Is it OK to leave objects on the Moon?
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-magazine-monitor-30130941

 

this pressed: The Rise of Invisible Unemployment – The Atlantic


Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

In the last year, the most important question for US economists and economic journalists has changed from Where are the jobs? to Where are the wages?

It’s a problem best summed up by Matthew O’Brien in the Washington Post. As the labor market approaches full employment, there should be more pressure on wages to rise. In the graph below, that would look like a trend-line pointing up and to the left. Instead, as you can see in a half-a-second glance, the trend-line is a blob and it’s certainly not pointing up. The unemployment rate has fallen below 6 percent, and earnings growth is flat.

via The Rise of Invisible Unemployment – The Atlantic.

today’s birthday: Chiang Kai-shek (1887)


Chiang Kai-shek (1887)

After the Qing dynasty was overthrown and a republic established in China, Chiang joined the Kuomintang (KMT)—the Nationalist Party—and rose through the ranks to become commander in chief of the revolutionary army and eventual successor to leader Sun Yat-sen. Under Chiang’s direction, the KMT broke with its former allies, the Communists, and began a protracted civil war. Despite some initial success, Chiang ultimately failed, and his government was driven from mainland China to where? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: US Government Prohibits All Exports to Cuba (1960)


US Government Prohibits All Exports to Cuba (1960)

After Cuba gained independence from Spain in 1898, US influence over the island grew. The two countries traded heavily until Fidel Castro rose to power in a bloody coup, and Cuba expropriated many American-owned land holdings. The US then enforced a prohibition of all exports to Cuba in 1960. Two years later, the US blockaded the island in order to compel the Soviet Union to dismantle its nuclear missile base. Although the word “embargo” exists in Spanish, what is the US embargo called in Cuba? More… Discuss

Part 2 of 2: The BBC is allowed to film in Cuba and show life under the absurd US trade embargo. Whilst the US moralises over a tiny Cuba, they do nothing about the likes of Iran, China and North Korea, who all have dubious human rights records. But of course, it’s easy to pick on a little island instead of a big country.
Recorded from BBC 1pm News, 26 February 2010.

this pressed for your right to know: Where Do the World’s Wealthiest People Live? – Real Time Economics – WSJ


Of course, the U.S. has a lot of wealthy people because it’s a big country. But the analysis suggests that the U.S. is punching above its weight, even after accounting for population. Total wealth per adult increased by $340,340 in North America, or an increase of 10.2% from the prior year. Total wealth per adult grew by nearly $146,000 in Europe, an increase of 10.4%.

By contrast, wealth per adult grew just 2.3% in China and it fell 1.9% in Latin America and 3.1% in India.

via Where Do the World’s Wealthiest People Live? – Real Time Economics – WSJ.

The Weeping Willow


The Weeping Willow

Easily recognized by its long drooping branches and leaves, the weeping willow belongs to the Salicaceae family of deciduous trees and shrubs. It is native to China, but, as willow cuttings generally take root quite easily, it has been cultivated elsewhere for millennia. Legend has it that all of England‘s weeping willows are descended from a cutting sent to Lady Suffolk from Spain. Though it is widely cultivated for ornamental purposes, the weeping willow is used by some to serve what function? More… Discuss

LEONARD COHEN LYRICS “Suzanne (…And when he knew for certain Only drowning men could see him He said “All men will be sailors then Until the sea shall free them”…): great compositions/performances



LEONARD COHEN LYRICS

“Suzanne”

Suzanne takes you down to her place near the river
You can hear the boats go by
You can spend the night beside her
And you know that she’s half crazy
But that’s why you want to be there
And she feeds you tea and oranges
That come all the way from China
And just when you mean to tell her
That you have no love to give her
Then she gets you on her wavelength
And she lets the river answer
That you’ve always been her lover
And you want to travel with her
And you want to travel blind
And you know that she will trust you
For you’ve touched her perfect body with your mind.

And Jesus was a sailor

When he walked upon the water
And he spent a long time watching
From his lonely wooden tower
And when he knew for certain
Only drowning men could see him
He said “All men will be sailors then
Until the sea shall free them”
But he himself was broken
Long before the sky would open
Forsaken, almost human
He sank beneath your wisdom like a stone
And you want to travel with him
And you want to travel blind
And you think maybe you’ll trust him
For he’s touched your perfect body with his mind. Now Suzanne takes your hand
And she leads you to the river
She is wearing rags and feathers
From Salvation Army counters
And the sun pours down like honey
On our lady of the harbour
And she shows you where to look
Among the garbage and the flowers
There are heroes in the seaweed
There are children in the morning
They are leaning out for love
And they will lean that way forever
While Suzanne holds the mirror
And you want to travel with her
And you want to travel blind
And you know that you can trust her
For she’s touched your perfect body with her mind.

quotation: “Thus, what is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy’s strategy.” Sun Tzu (544 BC-496 BC)


Thus, what is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy’s strategy.

Sun Tzu (544 BC496 BC) Discuss

news: Tens of Thousands Protest in Hong Kong


Tens of Thousands Protest in Hong Kong

Tens of thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators have taken to the streets in Hong Kong to protest Beijing‘s plan to vet candidates for the post of chief executive of Hong Kong in the 2017 elections. Since 1997, when Britain handed Hong Kong back to China, the chief executive has been selected by a 1,200-member election committee with pro-Beijing leanings. Last month, China agreed to allow direct elections in 2017, with the proviso that voters will only be able to choose from a list of pre-approved, almost undoubtedly pro-Beijing candidates. The protesters are demanding the freedom to choose their candidates. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Japan Resumes Diplomatic Relations with China (1972)


Japan Resumes Diplomatic Relations with China (1972)

The first Sino-Japanese War in the late 19th century damaged relations between the two countries for decades, as it marked the emergence of imperial Japan and saw harsh terms imposed on a badly defeated China. Relations did not improve until Kakuei Tanaka was elected prime minister of Japan in 1972. Shortly after his election, Tanaka visited China and signed an agreement establishing diplomatic relations between Japan and the Beijing regime. Who else made a historic visit to China in 1972? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Confucius’s Birthday


Confucius’s Birthday

This is a time to commemorate the birth of the teacher Confucius, perhaps the most influential man in China’s history. In Qufu, Shandong Province, China, the birthplace of Confucius, there is a two-week-long Confucian Culture Festival. During the Cultural Revolution in the late 1960s, Red Guards defaced many of the buildings in Qufu. They have since been restored, and the festival held there attracts scholars from China and abroad. The festival opens with a ceremony accompanied by ancient music and dance and includes exhibitions and lectures on the life and teachings of Confucius. More… Discuss

Would You Like Opium with That?


Would You Like Opium with That?

In an effort to hook his customers and keep them coming back for seconds, a Chinese noodle shop owner added a little something extra to his recipe: opium poppy seeds. The scheme was discovered when one of the shop’s patrons failed a drug test after being stopped by police. Suspecting the noodles he had eaten earlier were to blame, the man enlisted some of his relatives test out his theory. After eating noodles from the same shop, they too tested positive for drugs. When confronted by police, the shop owner admitted to having laced his noodles with the banned substance. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Empress Dowager Cixi Ends Hundred Days of Reform in China (1898)


Empress Dowager Cixi Ends Hundred Days of Reform in China (1898)

Empress Dowager Cixi was the de facto ruler of China for much of the period between 1861 and 1908. After the death of Emperor Xianfeng, as well as that of his only heir—his son by Cixi—she violated normal succession order and named her adoptive infant nephew Guangxu to the throne. In 1898, during the “hundred days of reform,” Guangxu issued a series of radical decrees modernizing China’s political and social structure. Cixi opposed the reforms and engineered a coup. What became of Guangxu? More… Discuss

People and places: The Mekong Delta


Brick factory - Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

Brick factory – Mekong Delta, Vietnam. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mekong Delta

The Mekong River—the longest river in Southeast Asia—flows from southern China through Tibet, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam, where it enters the South China Sea. The sediments it carries on the 2,700-mile (4,350-km) journey form the vast, extremely fertile Mekong Delta, which occupies southeast Cambodia and southern Vietnam. One of the greatest rice-growing areas in Asia, the densely populated delta region has been called a “biological treasure trove.” What did scientists recently discover there? More… Discuss

 

endangered species: Yangtze Fish Nearing Extinction


Yangtze Fish Nearing Extinction

The Chinese sturgeon, considered a “living fossil” due to its 140-million-year history, may not be around for much longer. It is teetering on the brink of extinction, thanks in large part to rising pollution levels and the construction of numerous dams along the Yangtze River it calls home. Only 100 specimens are thought to remain in the wild, and for the first year on record, none reproduced naturally in the river in 2013. Without additional conservation efforts, there is little hope for the future of this ancient creature. More… Discuss

Filigree


Filigree

Filigree is an ornamental work of fine gold or silver wire, often wrought into an openwork design and joined with matching solder under the flame of a blowpipe. It was made in ancient Egypt, China, and India. Saxons, Britons, and especially the Celts in Ireland were skilled at devising intricate and ingenious designs in the Middle Ages. Today, it is employed in Mediterranean areas, as well as in Mexico, India, and Scandinavian countries. What is the origin of the word “filigree“? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Ginseng Festival


Ginseng Festival

This festival is a celebration of ginseng in Fusong, a county in the Changbai Mountains of China and the largest ginseng grower in the country. The people of Fusong have traditionally celebrated the ginseng harvest, and, in 1987, the government officially set aside three days for both a festival and a trade fair of ginseng products. The festival features performances of yangko, dragon, and lion dances; story-telling parties with a ginseng theme; art and photo exhibits; and a fireworks display. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Taiwan Armed Forces Day


Taiwan Armed Forces Day

Founded in 1955, Armed Forces Day in Taiwan honors the country’s military and celebrates their victory over the Japanese in World War II (called the War of Resistance in Taiwan). The day is marked by military parades featuring special units chosen for their precision and outstanding performance. A troop-cheering by the onlookers is part of the celebration, as are educational activities covering the history of the war period and the role of the Taiwanese military in defeating the enemy. The day is also marked by the members of the armed forces having a rare day off from work. More… Discuss

this pressed: Ebola Outbreak in Sierra Leone Is Tied to One Funeral – NYTimes.com


Sierra Leone’s explosion of Ebola cases in early summer all appears to stem from one traditional healer’s funeral at which 14 women were infected, according to scientists studying the blood of victims.

The funeral, which took place in mid-May, constitutes a “super-spreader” event comparable to a 2003 one in a Hong Kong hotel in which one doctor from China dying of SARS infected nine other guests who spread the virus throughout the city and to Vietnam and Canada.”

via Ebola Outbreak in Sierra Leone Is Tied to One Funeral – NYTimes.com.

Led Zeppelin – Immigrant Song (Live Video) : make music part of your life series



from

Led Zeppelin – Immigrant Song (Live Video)


“Immigrant Song”

Ah, ah,

We come from the land of the ice and snow,

From the midnight sun where the hot springs flow.

The hammer of the gods will drive our ships to new lands,

To fight the horde, singing and crying: Valhalla, I am coming!On we sweep with threshing oar, Our only goal will be the western shore.

Ah, ah,
We come from the land of the ice and snow,
From the midnight sun where the hot springs blow.
How soft your fields so green, can whisper tales of gore,
Of how we calmed the tides of war. We are your overlords.

On we sweep with threshing oar, Our only goal will be the western shore.

So now you’d better stop and rebuild all your ruins,
For peace and trust can win the day despite of all your losing.

Bubonic Plague Death Prompts Quarantine in China


Bubonic Plague Death Prompts Quarantine in China

The bubonic plague has a prominent place in history books, having killed about a quarter of the European and Asian population in the 14th century in a pandemic now known as the Black Death, but its story does not end there. Periodic outbreaks on a much smaller scale have taken place since that time, with 60 succumbing to the disease in Madagascar not long ago. Thus, when a man in Yumen city, China, died of the plague last week, officials acted quickly to quarantine anyone he had contact with—151 people—and establish four quarantine zones in the city, setting up checkpoints to ensure the areas remain sealed off until they are certain the danger has passed. More… Discuss

Pagodas


Pagodas

A pagoda is a tiered tower with multiple eaves common to China, Japan, Korea, and other parts of Asia. The pagoda evolved from the Indian stupa—a dome-shaped shrine for Buddhist relics—and, like the stupa, is typically built for religious, often Buddhist, purposes. Whether octagonal, hexagonal, or square, pagodas are intended mainly as monuments and tend to have very little usable interior space. What is the “demon-arrester” that tops some pagodas? More… Discuss

US Moving to Join Landmine Convention


US Moving to Join Landmine Convention

The Ottawa Convention, a UN treaty banning landmines, currently has 161 signatories, but noticeably absent are several world powers, including the US, Russia, and China. Though the number of people killed or maimed each year by landmines has fallen considerably since the convention came into force in 1999, thousands—the vast majority of whom are civilians—still fall victim to these weapons each year. Now, the US has announced its intention to eventually join the treaty, and it is taking steps toward this by committing to end production and purchasing of anti-personnel landmines, allowing existing stockpiles to dwindle as they expire. More… Discuss

The Abacus


The Abacus

An abacus is a calculation tool, often a frame with beads sliding on wires. Used for centuries before the adoption of the written Arabic numeral system, it is still utilized by merchants in China and elsewhere. Though often attributed to the Chinese, it is thought to have been invented by the ancient Babylonians. The first abacus was probably a flat tablet covered in sand. Lines were drawn in the sand and pebbles were used to make calculations. What is the origin of the instrument’s name? More…

Saint of the Day for Thursday, June 5th, 2014: St. Boniface of Mainz


Saint of the Day

Image of St. Boniface of Mainz

St. Boniface of Mainz

Winfrith had expected to return to England from Friesland (in what is now Holland) in triumph. He had left the land where he was a respected scholar, teacher, and priest because he was convinced he … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

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Tiananmen Square Anniversary



Tiananmen: Australias Witnesses – The rarely heard perspectives of Australia‘s embassy staff

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In the weeks leading up to June 3, 1989 tens of thousands of students massed in Beijing’s enormous central square, drawn together by the death of liberal Communist Party figure Hu Yaobang and their collective desire for significant and immediate change. They wanted their hard-line leaders to yield and reform.
They wanted a free, fairer China. For China’s communist rulers it was a great affront to their authority. A provocation. They answered with soldiers, tanks and wholesale slaughter. “We went to see the two major student leaders and that’s when one told us crying that that night the soldiers would come, that there would be a lot of bloodshed, that a lot of people would die.” PETER EVERETT Defence Attaché, Australian Embassy Beijing, 1989. A lot of people did die. Precisely how many, we’ll never know. And to this day many Chinese themselves don’t even know the massacre took place. Despite the warp-speed advances in China’s economy and — to a limited extent — its openness, Tiananmen is still an officially forbidden subject. Until now the collective perspectives of Australia’s witnesses to Tiananmen have pretty much stayed under wraps as well. But in this extraordinarily revealing Foreign Correspondent key Embassy staffers have assembled for the first time to give their accounts of what happened.

ABC Australia – Ref 6149

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Tiananmen Square Anniversary

Each year thousands of people in Hong Kong, China, gather on June 4 to commemorate the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre with a candlelight vigil. On that day in 1989, Chinese government tanks rolled into Beijing‘s Tiananman Square, killing hundreds of demonstrators calling for democratic reforms in China, and injuring 10,000 more. Since 1997, the Chinese government has discouraged the Hong Kong commemorations and pressured foreign news correspondents not to cover the yearly event. In the year 2002 about 45,000 people attended the vigil. More… Discuss

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Chopsticks


Chopsticks

Chopsticks, developed about 3,000 to 5,000 years ago in China, are the traditional eating utensils of East Asia. Various materials, including wood, ivory, bamboo, and metal, have been used to produce the tapered sticks, which range from the plain to the ornately decorated. The etiquette surrounding chopstick use, and in fact the style of the sticks themselves, varies from culture to culture. To avoid unintentional insult at the table, one should keep in mind what rules when dining in China? More… Discuss

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Gunpowder tea (green tea): From Wikipedia


Gunpowder tea

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

China-Zhejiang.pngGunpowder tea (; pinyin: zhū chá) is a form of green Chinese tea produced in Zhejiang Province of China in which each leaf has been rolled into a small round pellet. It is believed to take its English name from the fact that the tea resembles grains of black powder. This rolling method of shaping tea is most often applied either to dried green tea (the most commonly encountered variety outside China) or Oolong tea.

Chinese Gunpowder Green Tea
Type: Green

Other names: Lo Chu Ch’a, Zhu Cha, 珠茶
Origin: Zhejiang Province China and others

Quick description: Popular worldwide. Flavor varies according to the growing location of tea used for production

Gunpowder tea production dates back to the Tang Dynasty 618–907. It was first introduced to Taiwan in the 19th century. Gunpowder tea leaves are withered, steamed, rolled, and then dried. Although the individual leaves were formerly rolled by hand, today most gunpowder tea is rolled by machines (though the highest grades are still rolled by hand). Rolling renders the leaves less susceptible to physical damage and breakage and allows them to retain more of their flavor and aroma. In addition, it allows certain types of oolong teas to be aged for decades if they are cared for by being occasionally roasted.

When buying gunpowder tea it is important to look for shiny pellets, which indicate that the tea is relatively fresh. Pellet size is also associated with quality, larger pellets being considered a mark of lower quality tea. High quality gunpowder tea will have small, tightly rolled pellets.[citation needed]

Varieties

When sold as a variety of tea, gunpowder tea has several varieties:

  • Pingshui gunpowder (平水珠茶): The original and most common variety of gunpowder tea with larger pearls, better color, and a more aromatic infusion, which is commonly sold as Temple of Heaven Gunpowder or Pinhead Gunpowder, the former, a common brand of this tea variety.[1][2]
  • Formosa gunpowder: A gunpowder style tea grown in Taiwan near Keelung, it is claimed to have its own characteristic aroma, different from that of Zhejiang Province gunpowder grown in mainland China. Formosa gunpowder teas are typically fresh or roasted oolongs.
  • Ceylon gunpowder: A gunpowder variant grown in Sri Lanka, usually at altitudes exceeding 1,800 metres (6,000 ft), see Green Ceylon teas.

Several types of green teas are commonly rolled into “gunpowder” form, including Chunmee, Tieguanyin, Huang Guanyin, and Dong Ding, as well as many other oolong and higher-end jasmine teas.

Etymology

In Chinese, gunpowder tea is called zhū chá (; literally “pearl tea” or “bead tea”; not to be confused with boba tea).

The origin of the English term may come from the tea’s similarity in appearance to actual gunpowder: greyish, dark pellets of irregular shape used as explosive propellant for early guns. The name may also have arisen from the fact that the grey-green leaf is tightly rolled into a tiny pellet and “explodes” into a long leaf upon being steeped in hot water. Another explanation is that the tea can also have a smoky flavor.

It is also possible that the English term may stem from the Mandarin Chinese phrase for “freshly brewed”, gāng pào de (), which sounds like the English word “gunpowder.”

Brewing methods

While brewing methods vary widely by tea and individual preferences, 1 teaspoon of looseleaf tea is recommended for every 150ml (5.07 oz) of water. Ideal water temperature for this type of tea is between 70 °C (158 °F) to 80 °C (176 °F). For the first and second brewing, leaves should be steeped for around one minute. It is also recommended that the tea cup or tea pot used should be rinsed with hot water prior to brewing the tea to warm the vessels. When brewed, gunpowder tea is a yellow color.

The flavor of brewed gunpowder tea is often described as thick and strong like a soft honey, but with a smokey flavor and an aftertaste that is slightly coppery. This type of tea is often seen as having a flavor that is somewhat grassy, minty, or peppery.

Use in the Maghreb

Moroccan tea ritual

Gunpowder tea is exported to the Maghreb where it is used in the preparation of traditional North African mint tea. The Moroccan tea ritual is at the heart of any social gathering, from an informal visit to a neighbour to lavish soirees with dignitaries. A minimum of two cups need to be drunk so as not to offend the host. Moroccan mint tea is made by adding mint and sugar or honey to gunpowder tea after brewing.

 

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Green tea: Is made from the leaves from Camellia sinensis


  • Green tea is made from the leaves from Camellia sinensis that have undergone minimal oxidation during processing. Green tea originated in China, but it has become associated with many cultures throughout Asia. Green tea has recently beco…
     
  • en.wikipedia.org
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