Tag Archives: Soviet Union

this day in the yesteryear: Operation Barbarossa: Nazi Germany Invades the Soviet Union (1941)


Operation Barbarossa: Nazi Germany Invades the Soviet Union (1941)

The largest military operation of World War II, Operation Barbarossa was the codename for Nazi Germany’s invasion of the Soviet Union. Named for 12th-century crusader and Holy Roman Emperor Frederick Barbarossa, the Axis operation included more than 4.5 million troops over a 1,800-mile (2,900-km) front. Though the Red Army suffered heavy losses, Operation Barbarossa failed and marked a turning point in the war that many believe sealed the Nazis’ fate. How many were killed during the operation? More… Discuss

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this day in the yesteryear: Soviet Union Lifts Blockade of Berlin (1949)


Soviet Union Lifts Blockade of Berlin (1949)

One of the first major crises of the Cold War, the Berlin blockade began in June 1948 during the multinational occupation of post-WWII Germany. In an attempt to force its former wartime allies—the US, the UK, and France—out of Berlin, the USSR began a blockade of all rail, road, and water traffic through East Germany to West Berlin. Rather than withdraw, the Western powers bypassed the blockade by airlifting thousands of tons of supplies into the city each day. What was Operation Little Vittles? More… Discuss

Fr Gustavo Gutierrez: the poor are the starting point of liberation theology :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Fr. Gustavo Gutierrez Merino, O.P., who is regarded as the father of liberation theology. Photo courtesy of Notre Dame/Matt Cashore

Vatican City, May 8, 2015 / 01:41 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Attention to the poor was the point of departure for liberation theology claimed Fr. Gustavo Gutierrez Merino, widely acknowledged as the founder of the movement, in a May 8 article in the Vatican‘s newspaper.

Fr. Gutierrez underscored that this attention to the poor came from what liberation theologians experienced in their own lives and lands.

“We referred to the poor as non-persons, but not in philosophical sense, because it is obvious that each human being is a person, rather in a sociological sense; the poor, that is, are not accepted as persons in our society. They are invisible and have not rights, their dignity is not recognized,” the Peruvian theologian wrote.

The publication of the article may be considered a sort of response to the assertions of Ion Mihai Pacepa, a former general in communist Romania’s secret police during the Cold War who defected to the West in the 1970s. In an interview with Catholic News Agency, Pacepa said the KGB created liberation theology and helped to foster it in Latin America, a claim which garnered attention within the Vatican’s walls.

The article published in L’Osservatore Romano is in fact an excerpt from one of Fr. Gutierrez’ books. It begins by saying there are two schools of thought about poverty, and both come from the Gospel: the first is focused on Christ’s sensitivity toward the poor and their suffering, and the second, that Christ himself “had lived a life of poverty, and so Christians, from their origin, understood that in order to be his disciples they also had to live a life of poverty.”

“Both of these schools are true,” he said, but “we have to interpret these two points of view on the bases of our historical context and of our lives.”

Fr. Gutierrez said the first perspective may be found in Luke’s version of the beatitude of the poor (Blessed are you poor, for the kingdom of God is yours), while the second is reflected in Matthew’s (Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven).

“I think both lines of thought – poverty as scandal and poverty of spirit – can be useful, although their meaning must be actualized in our historical period,” reflected Fr. Gutierrez.

He explained that “a new notion of poverty” has emerged in the past century. “Poverty, in Bible and in our times, is not a merely economic issue. Poverty is very much more than this. The economic dimension is important, perhaps primary, but it is is not the only one.”

Noting that we have become more aware of the multiple dimensions of poverty, Fr. Gutierrez said, “poverty was clearly the starting point of liberation theology, though we had not fully understood its complexity or variety.”

The Dominican priest, who will speak at next week’s general assembly of Caritas Internationalis, stressed that liberation theologians referred to the poor in a sociological sense, as persons “who are invisible and and have no rights.”

“We also defined them as the “insignificant.” It is possible to be insignificant for several reasons: if you do not have money, in our society you are insignificant; the colour of your skin may be another reason to be deemed insignificant … what is common among the poor is insignificance, invisibility, and a lack of respect,” Fr. Gutierrez said.

He then added that “these mutual complexities are different from one another” and that “the sense of non-person can be caused by several prejudices,” whether based on race, sex, culture, or economic status.

Fr. Gutierrez provided the example of a black Protestant pastor, who began a 1969 speech with the words: “We must feel that we exist!” “That strong declaration is the shout of the poor,” Fr. Gutierrez said.

The Dominican also provided the example of Peru’s indigenous people, who “are invisible, irrelevant … this is the sad story of an Indian’s daily life: even when he goes to the hospital to be cured, he is ignored,” wrote Fr. Gutierrez.

He then added that “poverty today is a phenomenon of our globalized civilization. For centuries, the poor have been close to us, they lived more or less near us, in the city or in the countryside. However, today we have realized that poverty goes very much beyond our gaze, it is a global phenomenon, if not universal. The majority of human beings in the world live in the condition we call poverty.”

This is a turning point, according to Fr. Gutierrez. He emphasized that in spiritual, moral or liturgical books of the past, writers “merely spoke of how to directly help the poor, who were close to us.” But “today we should be aware that our neighbors are both near and far. We must understand that a relation of ‘neighborhood’ is the result of our commitment.”

via Fr Gustavo Gutierrez: the poor are the starting point of liberation theology :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

this day in the yesteryear: Victory Day (1945)


Victory Day (1945)

Still celebrated in most of the Soviet successor states, Victory Day marks Nazi Germany‘s capitulation to the USSR in WWII. Signed on the evening of May 8, 1945—May 9 in Moscow’s time zone—the surrender followed Germany’s initial capitulation to the Allies. When the first surrender document was being signed, only one Soviet representative was present, and he had no instructions from Moscow nor any means of immediate contact with Soviet leaders. Was he punished or lauded for deciding to sign it? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Hitler Commits Suicide (1945)


Hitler Commits Suicide (1945)

In the final days of World War II, as the Red Army of the Soviet Union was closing in on his underground bunker in Berlin, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler committed suicide by shooting himself while simultaneously biting into a cyanide capsule. Hitler’s body and that of Eva Braun—his mistress whom he had wed the day before—were then placed in a bomb crater, doused with gasoline, and set on fire by German officials. How did Soviet soldiers identify Hitler’s remains? More… Discuss

Today In History: What Happened This Day In History (Tuesday, February 10, 2015)


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

February 10

1258   Huegu, a Mongol leader, seizes Baghdad, bringing and end to the Abbasid caliphate.
1620   Supporters of Marie de Medici, the queen mother, who has been exiled to Blois, are defeated by the king’s troops at Ponts de Ce, France.
1763   The Treaty of Paris ends the French-Indian War. France gives up all her territories in the New World except New Orleans and a few scattered islands.
1799   Napoleon Bonaparte leaves Cairo, Egypt, for Syria, at the head of 13,000 men.
1814   Napoleon personally directs lightning strikes against enemy columns advancing toward Paris, beginning with a victory over the Russians at Champaubert.
1840   Queen Victoria marries Prince Albert.
1846   Led by religious leader Brigham Young, the first Mormons begin a long westward exodus from Nauvoo, Il., to Utah.
1863   P.T. Barnum’s star midgets, Tom Thumb and Lavinia Warren, are married.
1904   Russia and Japan declare war on each other.
1915   President Wilson blasts the British for using the U.S. flag on merchant ships to deceive the Germans.
1939   Japanese occupy island of Hainan in French Indochina.
1941   London severs diplomatic relations with Romania.
1941   Iceland is attacked by German planes.
1942   The war halts civilian car production at Ford.
1945   B-29s hit the Tokyo area.
1955   Bell Aircraft displays a fixed-wing vertical takeoff plane.
1960   Adolph Coors, the beer brewer, is kidnapped in Golden, Colo.
1966   Protester David Miller is convicted of burning his draft card.
1979   The Metropolitan Museum announces the first major theft in 110-year history, $150,000 Greek marble head.
1986   The largest Mafia trial in history, with 474 defendants, opens in Palermo, Italy.
Born on February 10
1890  

Boris Pasternak, Russian novelist and poet (Dr. Zhivago).  (Listen to Doctor Zhivago, by Boris Pastenak on euzicasa! just click on the shortcut above!)

1893   Jimmy Durante, American comedian and film actor.
1894   Harold MacMillan, British prime minister (1957-1963).
1897   John F. Enders, virologist.
1898   Bertolt Brecht, German poet and dramatist (The Threepenny Opera).
1901   Stella Adler, actress and teacher.
1902   Walter Brattain, physicist, one of the inventors of the transistor.
1910   Dominique Georges Pire, Belgian cleric and educator.
1914   Larry Adler, harmonica virtuoso.
1920   Alex Comfort, English physician and author (Joy of Sex).
1927   (Mary Violet) Leontyne Price, opera singer.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.9xy5kPzI.dpuf

Education – Audiobooks – (Dare to listen): Boris Pasternak Doctor Zhivago


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

February 9

1567   Lord Darnley, the second husband of Mary, Queen of Scots, is murdered his sick-bed in a house in Edinburgh when the house blows up.
1799   The USS Constellation captures the French frigate Insurgente off the West Indies.
1825   The House of Representatives elects John Quincy Adams, sixth U.S. President.
1861   Jefferson F. Davis is elected president of the Confederate States of America.
1864   Union General George Armstrong Custer marries Elizabeth Bacon in their hometown of Monroe, Mich.
1904   Japanese troops land near Seoul, Korea, after disabling two Russian cruisers.
1909   France agrees to recognize German economic interests in Morocco in exchange for political supremacy.
1916   Conscription begins in Great Britain as the Military Service Act becomes effective.
1922   The U.S. Congress establishes the World War Foreign Debt Commission.
1942   Chiang Kai-shek meets with Sir Stafford Cripps, the British viceroy in India.
1943   The Red Army takes back Kursk 15 months after it fell to the Germans.
1946   Stalin announces the new five-year plan for the Soviet Union, calling for production boosts of 50 percent.
1951   Actress Greta Garbo gets U.S. citizenship.
1953   The French destroy six Viet Minh war factories hidden in the jungles of Vietnam.
1964   The U.S. embassy in Moscow is stoned by Chinese and Vietnamese students.
1978   Canada expels 11 Soviets in spying case.
1994   Nelson Mandela becomes the first black president of South Africa.
Born on February 9
1773   William Henry Harrison, ninth U.S. President and the first to die in office.
1814   Samuel Tilden, philanthropist.
1819   Lydia E. Pinkham, patent-medicine maker and entrepeneur.
1846   William Maybach, German engineer, designed the first Mercedes automobile.
1871   Howard T. Ricketts, pathologist.
1874   Amy Lowell, poet.
1880   James Stephens, Irish writer (The Charwoman’s Daughter, The Crock of Gold).
1909   Dean Rusk, Secretary of State under presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson.
1923   Brendan Behan, Irish playwright and poet (The Hostage, The Quare Fellow).
1944   Alice Walker, Pulitzer prize winning author (The Color Purple).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.EIt8nuuR.dpuf

Christoph Gluck: Iphigénie en Aulide, Wq. 40: VIII. Gavotte in A Major


Iphigénie en Aulide, Wq. 40: VIII. Gavotte in A Major

Scenes de Ballet for Orchestra in A Major, Op. 52, VII Valse, VIII Polonaise , great compositions/performances


Scenes de Ballet for Orchestra in A Major, Op. 52, VII Valse, VIII Polonaise

today in the yesteryear: Sputnik 1 Falls to Earth (1958)


Sputnik 1 Falls to Earth (1958)

Sputnik 1 was the first artificial satellite to be put into orbit. It was launched by the Soviet Union in October 1957 and acted as the starting gun for the Space Race. The first Sputnik, Russian for “fellow traveler,” was able to transmit radio signals for 22 days, emitting a beeping sound heard around the world. The US created NASA in October 1958, largely in response to this momentous occasion. How did US President Dwight Eisenhower react when he got word of Sputnik? More… Discuss

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
December 30

1460   The Duke of York is defeated and killed by Lancastrians at the Battle of Wakefield.
1803   The United States takes possession of the Louisiana area from France at New Orleans with a simple ceremony, the simultaneous lowering and raising of the national flags.
1861   Banks in the United States suspend the practice of redeeming paper money for metal currency, a practice that would continue until 1879.
1862   The draft of the Emancipation Proclamation is finished and circulated among President Abraham Lincoln’s cabinet for comment.
1905   Governor Frank Steunenberg of Idaho is killed by an assassin’s bomb.
1922   Soviet Russia is renamed the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.
1932   The Soviet Union bars food handouts for housewives under 36 years of age. They must now work to eat.
1947   Romania’s King Michael is forced to abdicate by Soviet-backed Communists. Communists now control all of Eastern Europe.
1965   Ferdinand E. Marcos is sworn in as the Philippine Republic’s sixth president.
1972   After two weeks of heavy bombing raids on North Vietnam, President Nixon halts the air offensive and agrees to resume peace negotiations with Hanoi representative Le Duc Tho.
1976   Governor Carey of New York pardons seven inmates, closing the book on the Attica uprising.
2006   Saddam Hussein, former Iraq dictator, is executed by hanging for crimes committed against his own people during his rule.
Born on December 30
1865   Rudyard Kipling, British author (Jungle Book, Soldiers Three).
1867   Simon Guggenheim, philanthropist and U.S. senator for Colorado.
1884   Tojo Hideki, Japanese Prime Minister during World War II.
1928   Bo Diddley, blues composer and singer.
1935   Sandy Koufax, Hall of Fame left-handed pitcher with the L.A. Dodgers.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.21paDIlW.dpuf

this day in the yesteryear: Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Formed (1922)


Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Formed (1922)

Traditionally considered the successor state of the Russian Empire, the USSR was established in 1922 and unified the Russian, Ukrainian, Belorussian, and Transcaucasian Soviet republics under one government. The largest country in the world, the USSR occupied a seventh of the land surface on Earth. It became a superpower that rivaled the US in domination of global affairs until its collapse and dissolution in 1991. In what year were diplomatic relations between the US and USSR first established? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Helmut Schmidt (1918)


Helmut Schmidt (1918)

Schmidt is a German Social Democratic statesman who was the chancellor of West Germany from 1974 to 1982. His administration was characterized by a tough approach to the worldwide economic recession of the era. He was committed to improving relations with East Germany and the USSR, and he succeeded in cultivating ties with France, encouraging economic cooperation among western European nations, and maintaining close relations with the US. Why was he the subject of a police inquiry in 2008? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Albania Independence Day


Albania Independence Day

The Albanian people proclaimed their independence from the Turks on this day in 1912. The Turks first invaded this part of Europe around 1400, and they ruled the country for more than 400 years. It wasn’t until the end of the Balkan War that Turkish rule was abolished and a proclamation of independence issued on November 28, 1912. Independence Day is a public holiday observed throughout Albania and is marked by a festive parade in Tirana, the capital. It is followed by Liberation Day on November 29, the day on which the invasions of German and Italian troops during World War II were ended in 1944. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Leon Trotsky (1879)


Leon Trotsky (1879)

Trotsky was a Russian Communist revolutionary whose ideas form the basis of Trotskyism, a Communist ideology based on the theory of worldwide revolution. He was a key figure in the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution in Russia and organized the Red Army in the civil war that followed. After a power struggle with Joseph Stalin in the 1920s, Trotsky was exiled from the USSR. In 1940, he was assassinated in Mexico by a Spanish Communist with alleged ties to Stalin. From whom did he borrow the name “Trotsky”? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: US Government Prohibits All Exports to Cuba (1960)


US Government Prohibits All Exports to Cuba (1960)

After Cuba gained independence from Spain in 1898, US influence over the island grew. The two countries traded heavily until Fidel Castro rose to power in a bloody coup, and Cuba expropriated many American-owned land holdings. The US then enforced a prohibition of all exports to Cuba in 1960. Two years later, the US blockaded the island in order to compel the Soviet Union to dismantle its nuclear missile base. Although the word “embargo” exists in Spanish, what is the US embargo called in Cuba? More… Discuss

Part 2 of 2: The BBC is allowed to film in Cuba and show life under the absurd US trade embargo. Whilst the US moralises over a tiny Cuba, they do nothing about the likes of Iran, China and North Korea, who all have dubious human rights records. But of course, it’s easy to pick on a little island instead of a big country.
Recorded from BBC 1pm News, 26 February 2010.

this day in the yesteryear: Boris Yeltsin Orders Tanks to Storm Russian Parliament (1993)


Boris Yeltsin Orders Tanks to Storm Russian Parliament (1993)

As president of an independent Russia, Boris Yeltsin sought to end state control of the economy but clashed with parliament, which was controlled by former Communists. When Yeltsin suspended the parliament, it retaliated by naming Vice President Aleksandr Rutskoi as acting president, and anti-Yeltsin forces barricaded themselves inside the parliament building. The military interceded on Yeltsin’s side and, after a bloody battle, troops recaptured the parliament building. What was the death toll? More… Discuss

Jonathan Carney “Romance” The Gadfly, for Irene: great compositions/performances


Jonathan Carney “Romance” The Gadfly, for Irene

article: The Aswan High Dam


The Aswan High Dam

Located near Aswan, Egypt, the Aswan High Dam regulates the Nile River‘s annual flooding and produces a great deal of hydroelectric power. Constructed from 1960 to 1970, it was financed largely by the Soviet Union after the US and Britain withdrew their financial support in 1956 due to differences with Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser. The dam’s creation of Lake Nasser required the relocation of some 90,000 people. What else had to be relocated? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Two Plus Four Agreement Signed in Moscow (1990)


Two Plus Four Agreement Signed in Moscow (1990)

The Two Plus Four Agreement, also known as the Treaty on the Final Settlement With Respect to Germany, was the final peace treaty negotiated between West Germany and East Germany—the “Two”—and the four powers that occupied Germany at the end of World War II: France, the UK, the US, and the Soviet Union. The treaty paved the way for the German reunification, which took place less than a month later, on October 3. What rights did the four powers renounce under the treaty’s terms? More… Discuss

Chopin – Etude Op.25 No.11 (‘Winter Wind’) – Sviatoslav Richter – Video: Unique musical moments


ChopinEtude Op.25 No.11 (‘Winter Wind‘) – Sviatoslav Rich

today’s birthday: Trygve Lie (1896)


Trygve Lie (1896)

The United Nations was established in 1945, and Lie, a Norwegian politician, became its first Secretary General the next year. His role required that he take an active part in a variety of negotiations, but the Soviet Union ceased to cooperate with him after he supported UN intervention in the Korean War, and his effectiveness was further hampered by charges from anticommunist politicians in the US that his secretariat had employed subversives. What was the impetus for Lie’s resignation in 1952? More… Discuss

this day in history


Lead Story
Building of Hoover Dam begins, 1930
American Revolution
Battle of Hubbardton, 1777
Automotive
Stock car driver Kenny Irwin Jr. dies in crash, 2000
Civil War
Kit Carson’s campaign against the Indians, 1863
Cold War
Samantha Smith leaves for visit to the USSR, 1983
Crime
Mary Surratt is first woman executed by U.S. federal government, 1865
Disaster
Tanker accident causes deadly fire, 1987
General Interest
The impeachment of Senator Blount, 1797
U.S. occupies Iceland, 1941
Female cadets enrolled at West Point, 1976
O’Connor nominated to Supreme Court, 1981
Terrorists attack London transit system at rush hour, 2005
Hollywood
Johnny Depp stars in second Pirates of the Caribbean movie, 2006
Literary
Birthday of Sherlock Holmes’ sidekick, Dr. Watson, 1852
Music
“The Stripper,” by David Rose, becomes the #1 pop hit in America, 1962
Old West
Warren Earp killed in Arizona, 1900
Presidential
Future President Jimmy Carter marries, 1946
Sports
Jim Thorpe begins Olympic triathlon, 1912
Vietnam War
China announces it will provide aid to Hanoi, 1955
New ambassador arrives in Saigon, 1964
First U.S. troops withdrawn from South Vietnam, 1969
World War I
British Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps is officially established, 1917
World War II
Himmler decides to begin medical experiments on Auschwitz prisoners, 1942

great compositions/performances: Leonid Kogan plays Lalo Symphonie Espagnole op.21, Kirill Kondrashin USSR 1959 – LIVE


[youtube.com/watch?v=XRe9rlZ2Mio]

Leonid Kogan plays Lalo Symphonie Espagnole op.21, Kirill Kondrashin USSR 1959 LIVE

Leonid Kogan (1924-1982), the great Russian violinist.

Édouard-Victoire-Antoine Lalo (1823- 1892) was a French composer.

Symphonie Espagnole, op.21
I. Allergo non troppo (0:00)
II. Scherzando – Allegro molto (7:27)
III. Intermezzo – Allegro non troppo (11:36)
IV. Andante (17:21)
V. Rondo – Allegro(23:41)

Kirill Kondrashin
The USSR State Symphony Ochestra
Recorded in 1959. 10. 21
Live at the Moscow Conservatory Grand Hall

*****

There are three Kogan’s Lalo Symphonie Espagnole recordings I know by now :

with Charles Bruck
Paris Conservatory Orchestra
1950s

with Kirill Kondrashin
Philhamonia Orchestra
London, Abbey Road Studio
1959. 2. 25-27

with Kirill Konrashin
USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Live at Moscow Conservatory Grand Hall
1959. 10. 21

 

 

this day in history: Boris Yeltsin Elected President of Russia (1991)


Boris Yeltsin Elected President of Russia (1991)

Yeltsin served as Russia’s first democratically elected president. He directed the Russian Federation‘s secession from the USSR and the formation of a new, decentralized confederation, the Commonwealth of Independent States, with himself as its leader. As president, Yeltsin instituted a radical reform program that consisted of the mass privatization of state-run enterprises, after which the country experienced inflation, heavy taxes, and a protracted economic depression. Who succeeded Yeltsin? More… Discuss

make music part of your life series: S.Riсhter plays P.Tchaikovsky L’espiegle, Op.72


[youtube.com/watch?v=LX-I89T-MEM]
make music part of your life series:  S.Riсhter plays P.Tchaikovsky L’espiegle, Op.72

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: Luna 5 Crashes on the Moon (1965)


Luna 5 Crashes on the Moon (1965)

Luna 5 was an unmanned Soviet space probe launched for lunar investigation. On May 10, the spacecraft began spinning around its axis due to a problem in a gyroscope in the guidance system unit. A subsequent attempt to fire the main engine failed because of a ground control error, and Luna 5 impacted the lunar surface. Though it failed to soft-land—Luna 9 would do so a year later—Luna 5 was the second Soviet lunar probe to land on the moon. What was the first? More… Discuss

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Schubert Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major


[youtube.com/watch?v=8YFX-XQLToE]
Schubert Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Valentina Lisitsa
Valentina Lisitsa beside a piano
Background information
Born 1973
KievUkrainian SSRSoviet Union
Genres Classical
Occupations Classical pianist
Instruments Piano
Website www.valentinalisitsa.com

Valentina Lisitsa (UkrainianВалентина Лисиця, translit. Valentyna Lysytsya) is a Ukrainian-born and trainedclassical pianist who resides in North Carolina.[1][2] Lisitsa is among the most frequently viewed pianists on YouTube and is often praised as a highly commendable pianist.[3][4] Lisitsa followed a unique path to success, independently launching the beginnings of her career via social media, without initially signing to a tour promoteror record company.[3][4]

Biography[edit]

Lisitsa was born in KievUkraine, in 1973. She started playing the piano at the age of three, performing her first solo recital at the age of four.[5]

Despite her early disposition to music, her dream at that point was to become a professional chess player.[6]Lisitsa attended the Lysenko music school for Gifted Children and, later, Kiev Conservatory,[7] where she and her future husband, Alexei Kuznetsoff, studied under Dr. Ludmilla Tsvierko.[8] It was when Lisitsa met Kuznetsoff that she began to take music more seriously.[9] In 1991, they won the first prize in The Murray Dranoff Two Piano Competition in Miami, Florida.[7][10] That same year, they moved to the United States to further their careers as concert pianists.[3] In 1992 the couple married.[3] Their New York debut was at the Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center in 1995.[8]

After the death of her manager, and with the thought that she was “just another blonde Russian pianist”[11] Lisitsa almost gave up on her career as a concert pianist, and contemplated becoming a local worker for the government in Washington, D.C., but changed her mind at the last minute influenced by one of her new fans in England. Lisitsa posted her first YouTube video in 2007, gaining even more online attention after uploading her own set of Chopin etudes online for free (in response to an illegal upload of the same set beforehand). Her set of Chopin etudes reached the number one slot on Amazon’s classical video recordings, and became the most-viewed online set of Chopin etudes on YouTube.[3]

Furthering her career, Lisitsa and her husband put their life savings in recording a CD of Rachmaninov concertos with the London Symphony Orchestra in 2010.[3] In the spring of 2012, before her Royal Albert Hall debut, Lisitsa was signed on to Decca Records, who later released her Rachmaninov CD set.[3] By mid-2012 she had nearly 50 million views on her YouTube videos.[4]

Lisitsa has performed in various venues around the world, including Carnegie HallAvery Fisher HallBenaroya HallMusikverein and Royal Albert Hall. She is well known for her online recitals and practicing streams. She has also collaborated with violinist Hilary Hahn for various recital engagements.[7]

Discography

Lisitsa has recorded six CDs for Audiofon Records, including three solo CDs and two discs of duets with her husband Alexei Kuznetsoff; a Gold CD for CiscoMusic label with cellist DeRosa; a duet recital on VAI label with violinist Ida Haendel; and DVDs of Frédéric Chopin’s 24 EtudesSchubertLiszt Schwanengesang.[12]

Her recording of the 4 sonatas for violin and piano by composer Charles Ives, made with Hahn, was released in October 2011 on Deutsche Grammophone label. Her album “Valentina Lisitsa Live at the Royal Albert Hall” (based on her debut performance at that venue 19 June 2012) was released 2 July 2012.

Lisitsa has recently recorded several projects from the composers Rachmaninoff, Liszt, Chopin, and Beethoven. Her complete album of Rachmaninoff concertos was released in October 2012 by Decca Records.[13] The most recent album of Liszt works was released in October 2013 on Decca label in 2 formats – CD and 12″ LP which was cut unedited from analog tape.

External links

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Ave verum, Op.65 No.1 / Gabriel Fauré



Direction : Richard Marlow
*THE CHOIR TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE : Female Voice
*Recorded : 1996 in Chapel of Trinity College, Cambridge

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: NUCLEAR REACTOR AT CHERNOBYL PLANT EXPLODES (1986)


Nuclear Reactor at Chernobyl Plant Explodes (1986)

The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant is regarded as the worst nuclear accident in history. Radioactive debris from the disaster drifted across parts of the western Soviet Union and Europe. Large areas of Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia were badly contaminated, resulting in the resettlement of hundreds of thousands of people and a disputed number of deaths. The incident set off an international outcry over the dangers posed by radioactive emissions. What caused the accident? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: NIKITA KHRUSHCHEV (1894)


Nikita Khrushchev (1894)

In the power struggle that followed Joseph Stalin’s death, Nikita Khrushchev emerged as leader of the USSR. He became First Secretary of the Communist Party in 1953 and the Soviet premier five years later. He was highly critical of Stalin’s rule and oversaw many reforms. Jovial in manner and often deliberately uncouth, he had a brash, extraverted style of diplomacy that became his trademark. Before his removal from office, the Communist Party accused him of mishandling what event in 1962? More… Discuss

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The Beatles – Back in the USSR


[youtube.com/watch?v=PxyISsA0Oh0]

The Beatles – Back in the USSR

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: PAN AMERICAN DAY


Pan American Day

The International Union of American Republics (now called the Pan American Union)—general secretariat of the Organization of American States (OAS)—designated April 14 as Pan American Day in 1930. Although each member country holds its own celebration, it is at the Pan American Union building in Washington, D.C., that one of the largest observances takes place. Students from all over the Western Hemisphere travel to Washington where, against a backdrop of flags in the courtyard of the House of the Americas, they perform folk songs and dances. More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: STALIN APPOINTED GENERAL SECRETARY OF THE COMMUNIST PARTY (1922)


Stalin Appointed General Secretary of the Communist Party (1922)

After the October Revolution of 1917, Stalin began to emerge as a leader within the new Russian regime. He became one of Lenin’s top aides and was appointed general secretary of the Communist Party in 1922. Although Lenin expressed misgivings about Stalin’s use of power and recommended his removal, Stalin maintained his position and went on to take control of the USSR following Lenin’s death. Born Joseph Dzhugashvili, he adopted the surname Stalin in 1913. What does the name mean? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: ETHEL AND JULIUS ROSENBERG CONVICTED OF ESPIONAGE (1951)


Ethel and Julius Rosenberg Convicted of Espionage (1951)

In 1951, the Rosenbergs were prosecuted for conspiracy to transmit classified military information to the Soviet Union. During the Rosenbergs’ trial, the government charged that they had persuaded Ethel’s brother, an employee at the Los Alamos atomic bomb project, to provide them with top-secret data on nuclear weapons. They were convicted and executed via the electric chair, becoming the first US civilians to suffer the death penalty for espionage. What happened to their children? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: ANSCHLUSS: GERMAN TROOPS OCCUPY AUSTRIA (1938)


Anschluss: German Troops Occupy Austria (1938)

Though the union of Austria and Germany was forbidden by the Treaty of Saint-Germain in 1919, the Nazis annexed Austria in 1938. The German term Anschluss—”annexation“—is most frequently used in reference to this event. When the Nazis entered Austria to enforce the Anschluss, they encountered no military opposition and quickly took control. The US, USSR, and UK signed a declaration proclaiming the Anschluss null and void in 1943, yet Austria did not regain its sovereignty until what year? More…Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: YURI GAGARIN (1934)


Yuri Gagarin (1934)

Gagarin was a Russian cosmonaut who, in 1961, became the first human being to successfully travel into space. Gagarin circled the Earth once during his 1-hour-and-48-minute flight aboard the Vostok 1. His success is believed to have ushered in the modern era of man in space, and Gagarin toured widely to promote the Soviet achievement. Ironically, he died in a plane crash seven years later. What factors did Soviet officials consider when choosing Gagarin for the historic space flightMore… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: FIRST ROCK FESTIVAL HELD IN THE SOVIET UNION (1980)


First Rock Festival Held in the Soviet Union (1980)

Dubbed the “Soviet Woodstock,” the 1980 Tbilisi rock festival is widely considered the turning point in the history of Russian rock music. Held in Tbilisi—capital of the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic—the event was the USSR‘s first official rock festival. However, unlike Woodstock, the high point of youth counterculture in the US, freedom of expression at Tbilisi-80 was limited, and the jury stormed out after one performer’s provocative moves. Which bands performed at the event? More…Discuss

 

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History of Ukraine (excerpts from Wikipedia) <<<>>


[youtube.com/watch?v=28Ms7_K4TMM
History of Ukraine
]

Tetyana Ivanytska “Have Mercy On Me, Oh Lord” (Ukrainian classical music)
Artists: “Khreschatyk” Academic Chamber Choir, a conductor — Pavlo Struts
Kyiv, 2008

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Part of a series on the
History of Ukraine
Coat of arms of Ukraine
Portal icon Ukraine portal
 

The territory of Ukraine has been inhabited for at least forty four thousand years.[1] It is where the horse was first domesticated[2] and a candidate site of the origins of the Proto-Indo-European language family.[3][4]

According to a popular and well established theory, the medieval state of Kievan Rus was established by the Varangians in the 9th century as the first historically recorded East Slavic state. It emerged as a powerful nation in the Middle Ages but disintegrated in the 12th century. By the middle of the 14th century, present Ukrainian territories were under the rule of three external powers: the Golden Horde, the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, and the Kingdom of Poland, during the 15th century these lands came under the rule of the Crown of the Kingdom of PolandPolish Lithuanian Commonwealth (since 1569), and Crimean Khanate.[5] In 1653 the greater portion of the population rebelled against dominantly Polish Catholic rule and in January 1654 an assembly of the people (rada) voted at Pereyaslav to turn to Moscow, effectively joining the southeastern portion of the Polish-Lithuanian empire east of the Dnieper River to Russia.[6] After the Partitions of Poland (1772–1795) and conquest of Crimean Khanate, Ukraine was divided between Russia and Austria, thus the largest part of Ukraine was integrated into theRussian Empire, with the rest under Austrian (known as Austro-Hungarian since 1849) control.

chaotic period of warfare ensued after the Russian Revolution, with internationally recognized establishment of an independent Ukrainian People’s Republic. Independent Ukraine emerged from its own civil war. The Ukrainian–Soviet Warfollowed, which resulted in the Soviet Army establishing control in late 1919[7]Soviet victory. The conquerors created theUkrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, which on 30 December 1922 became one of the founding republics of the Soviet Union. The Soviet government was hostile to Ukrainian language and Ukrainian culture; there were mass repressions of Ukrainian poets, historians and linguists. Then there was a genocide of Ukrainians: millions of people starved to death in 1932 and 1933 in the Holodomor. After the 1939 invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany and Soviet Union, the Ukrainian SSR’s territory was enlarged westward. During World War II the Ukrainian Insurgent Army tried to reestablish Ukrainian independence and fought against both Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. But in 1941 Ukraine was occupied by Nazi Germany, being liberated in 1944. In 1945, the Ukrainian SSR became one of the founding members of the United Nations.[8] In 1954, it expanded to the south with the transfer of the Crimea.

Ukraine became independent again when the Soviet Union dissolved in 1991. This dissolution started a period of transition to amarket economy, in which Ukraine suffered an eight-year recession.[9] Since then, however, the economy has experienced a high increase in GDP growthUkraine was caught up in the worldwide economic crisis in 2008 and the economy plunged. GDP fell 20% from spring 2008 to spring 2009, then leveled off as analysts compared the magnitude of the downturn to the worst years of economic depression during the early 1990s.[10]

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Czechoslovakian Revolt 1968 and Ucraine 2014



Czechoslovakian Revolt 1968 and Ucraine 2014 

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: SVETLANA ALLILUYEVA (1926)


Svetlana Alliluyeva (1926)

The youngest child of Joseph Stalin, and his only daughter, Svetlana Alliluyeva caused a furor when she defected to the West in the 1960s, leaving behind her two grown children in the process. After becoming a naturalized US citizen, she published two successful memoirs, married, took the name Lana Peters, had a daughter, and divorced. In 1984, she returned to the USSR and renounced her defection, but her resolve soon wavered. How long was it before she left again for the West? More… Discuss

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Emil Gilels – Mozart – Piano Concerto No 27 in B flat major, K 595 – Ovchinnikov




*****Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

*****Piano Concerto No 27 in B flat major, K 595

*****Emil Gilels, piano
*****USSR State Symphony Orchestra
*****Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov, conductor

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: SOVIET SATELLITE BREAKS UP UPON REENTRY, SCATTERING NUCLEAR DEBRIS (1978)


Soviet Satellite Breaks Up upon Reentry, Scattering Nuclear Debris (1978)

Cosmos 954 was a Soviet reconnaissance satellite that used radar to observe ocean traffic. It was launched in September 1977 and quickly began to experience problems. Within months, it had deviated from its designed orbit. A malfunction prevented the safe separation of its onboard nuclear reactor, so when the satellite reentered the Earth’s atmosphere, it scattered radioactive debris over northern Canada, necessitating an extensive clean-up operation. How much did Canada bill the USSR for this? More… Discuss

 

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Sviatoslav Richter plays Grieg Lyric Pieces – Op.65 No.6 ‘Wedding day at Troldhaugen’


Sviatoslav Richter plays Grieg Lyric Pieces – Op.65 No.6 ‘Wedding day at Troldhaugen

  • The image of Russian pianist Sviatoslav Richte...

    The image of Russian pianist Sviatoslav Richter (1915-1997) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

    Sviatoslav Richter

    Pianist
  • Sviatoslav Teofilovich Richter was a Soviet pianist well known for the depth of his interpretations, virtuoso technique, and vast repertoire. He is widely considered one of the greatest pianists of the 20th century. Wikipedia
 

 

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ARTICLE: THE TREPOV INCIDENT


The Trepov Incident

In July 1877, a Soviet political prisoner refused to remove his cap in the presence of St. Petersburg governor Theodore Trepov, a colonel known for violently suppressing rebellions. In retaliation, Trepov ordered that the man be flogged, which outraged Vera Zasulich, a fellow prisoner allied with a revolutionary group. In January 1888, Zasulich wounded Trepov with a revolver shot. In the trial that followed, a sympathetic jury found Zasulich not guilty. What happened to her? More… Discuss

 

THE IROQUOIS THEATER FIRE (1903)


The Iroquois Theater Fire (1903)

Billed as “absolutely fireproof,” Chicago’s Iroquois Theater was filled with mostly women and children—out of school for the holidays—for a matinée on December 30, 1903, when a curtain caught fire. One actor tried calming the audience, but panic spread. Many escape routes were unmarked, and a stampede ensued. As people fled, the cold air they let in fed the inferno. More than 575 people died—a death toll more than double that of the famed 1871 Chicago Fire. What show had packed the theater? More… Discuss

 

GREAT PERFORMANCES: Emil Gilels “Symphonic Variations” by C. Franck



Symphonic Variations for Piano and Orchestra
by César Franck
Emil Gilels, piano
Radio Symphony Orchestra of the USSR
Karl Eliasberg, conductor
04.III.1951
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphonic Variations (Variations symphoniques), M. 46, is a work for piano and orchestra written in 1885 by César Franck. It has been described as “one of Franck’s tightest and most finished works”,[1] “a superb blending of piano and orchestra”,[2] and “a flawless work and as near perfection as a human composer can hope to get in a work of this nature”.[3] It is a fine example of Franck’s use of cyclic unity, with one theme growing into various others.[4] The piano and orchestra share equally in the continuous evolution of ideas.[3] The work is in F-sharp minor (with the last movement in F-sharp major). Duration in performance is about fifteen minutes, and the instrumentation is piano solo and orchestra: pairs of flutes, oboes, clarinets, and bassoons; four horns; two trumpets; timpani; and strings.[5]

The work was dedicated to Louis Diémer, who on 15 March 1885 had premiered Les Djinns – a symphonic poem for piano and orchestra that brought Franck one of his rare critical successes. He promised to reward Diémer with “a little something”, and the similarly scored Symphonic Variations was the result.[6] Franck started work in the summer of 1885, and completed the piece on 12 December.

In 1946 the choreographer Frederick Ashton used Franck’s work for a ballet, also called Symphonic Variations.

Ralph Vaughan Williams‘s Fantasia (quasi variazione) on the Old 104th Psalm Tune for piano, chorus, and orchestra (1949) has some similarities to the Symphonic variations, but it lacks Franck’s adherence to classical variation form.[10]

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: THE UNITED NATIONS IS FORMALLY ESTABLISHED (1945)


The United Nations Is Formally Established (1945)

The United Nations (UN) is an international organization founded to promote peace, security, and economic development. Representatives from the US, the UK, the Soviet Union, and China first met in 1944 to discuss the problems involved in creating such an agency, and the results of their talks became the basis for the UN Charter that was ratified in 1945. Established immediately after WWII, it replaced the essentially powerless League of Nations. Who first coined the term “United Nations”? More… Discuss

 

Emil Gilels – Schumann – Symphonic Etudes, Op 13



Robert Schumann
Symphonic Etudes, Op 13

Emil Gilels, piano