Tag Archives: England

Saint of the Day for Sunday, June 7th, 2015: St. Willibald


Image of St. Willibald

St. Willibald

Bishop and missionary. A native of Wessex, England, he was the brother of Sts. Winebald and Walburga and was related through his mother to the great St. Boniface. After studying in a monastery in … continue reading

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Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


clock_fall_back_animatedToday In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
June 5

1099   Members of the First Crusade witness an eclipse of the moon and interpret it as a sign they will recapture Jerusalem.
1568   Ferdinand, the Duke of Alba, crushes the Calvinist insurrection in Ghent.
1595   Henry IV’s army defeats the Spanish at the Battle of Fontaine-Francaise.
1637   American settlers in New England massacre a Pequot Indian village.
1783   Joseph and Jacques Montgolfier make the first public balloon flight.
1794   The U.S. Congress prohibits citizens from serving in any foreign armed forces.
1827   Athens falls to Ottoman forces.
1851   Harriet Beecher Stow publishes the first installment of Uncle Tom’s Cabin in The National Era.
1856   U.S. Army troops in the Four creeks region of California, head back to quarters, officially ending the Tule River War. Fighting, however, will continue for a few more years.
1863   The Confederate raider CSS Alabama captures the Talisman in the Mid-Atlantic.
1872   The Republican National Convention, the first major political party convention to includes blacks, commences.
1880   Wild woman of the west Myra Maybelle Shirley marries Sam Starr even though records show she was already married to Bruce Younger.
1900   British troops under Lord Roberts seize Pretoria from the Boers.
1940   The German army begins its offensive in Southern France.
1944   The first B-29 bombing raid strikes the Japanese rail line in Bangkok, Thailand.
1947   Secretary of State George C. Marshall outlines “The Marshall Plan,” a program intended to assist European nations, including former enemies, to rebuild their economies.
1956   Premier Nikita Khrushchev denounces Josef Stalin to the Soviet Communist Party Congress.
1967   The Six-Day War between Israel and Egypt, Syria and Jordan begins.
1968   Sirhan Sirhan shoots Democratic presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy after Kennedy’s victory in the pivotal California primary election.
1973   Doris A. Davis becomes the first African-American woman to govern a city in a major metropolitan area when she is elected mayor of Compton, California.
2004   Former U.S. President Ronald Reagan dies at age 93. Reagan was the 40th president of the United States.
Born on June 5
1723   Adam Smith, Scottish philosopher and economist.
1878   Francisco “Pancho” Villa, Mexican revolutionary and guerrilla leader.
1883   John Maynard Keynes, economist.
1884   Dame Ivy Compton-Burnett, British author.
1898   Federico Garcia Lorca, Spanish poet and dramatist.
1915   Alfred Kazin, critic and editor (A Walker in the City).
1919   Richard Scarry, Children’s author and illustrator.
1926   David Wagoner, poet and novelist (The Escape Artist).
1932   Christy Brown, Irish novelist and poet (My Left Foot).
1939   Margaret Drabble, English novelist (The Millstone, The Realms of Gold).
1947   David Hare, British playwright and director (A Map of the World, Slag).
1949   Ken Follett, novelist (Eye of the Needle, On The Wings of Eagles).

this day in history: Bare-Knuckle Fighter Dies After 99-Round Fight (1833)


Bare-Knuckle Fighter Dies After 99-Round Fight (1833)

In 1830, bare-knuckle prizefighter Simon Byrne, Ireland‘s heavyweight boxing champion, fought Alexander McKay, the “Champion of Scotland,” for the right to challenge England‘s heavyweight champ. McKay died of a head injury shortly after losing the lengthy fight, and Byrne was charged but later cleared of manslaughter. Three years later, Byrne fought England’s champion, James Burke. After 3 hours and 99 rounds, Byrne was knocked out. He died days later. What became of Burke after the fatal fight? More… Discuss

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


 

 

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
May 20

325   The Ecumenical council is inaugurated by Emperor Constantine in Nicea.
1303   A peace treaty is signed between England and France.
1347   Cola di Rienzo takes the title of tribune in Rome.
1520   Hernando Cortes defeats Spanish troops sent against him in Mexico.
1690   England passes the Act of Grace, forgiving followers of James II.
1674   John Sobieski becomes Poland’s first king.
1774   Parliament passes the Coercive Acts to punish the colonists for their increasingly anti-British behavior. The acts close the port of Boston.
1775   North Carolina becomes the first colony to declare its independence.
1784   The Peace of Versailles ends a war between France, England, and Holland.
1799   Napoleon Bonaparte orders a withdrawal from his siege of St. Jean d’Acre in Egypt.
1859   A force of Austrians collide with Piedmontese cavalry at the village of Montebello, in northern Italy.
1861   North Carolina becomes the last state to secede from the Union.
1862   President Lincoln signs the Homestead Act, providing 250 million acres of free land to settlers in the West.
1874   Levi Strauss begins marketing blue jeans with copper rivets.
1902   The U.S. military occupation of Cuba ends.
1927   Charles Lindbergh takes off from New York for Paris.
1930   The first airplane is catapulted from a dirigible.
1932   Amelia Earhart lands near Londonderry, Ireland, to become the first woman fly solo across the Atlantic.
1939   Pan American Airways starts the first regular passenger service across the Atlantic.
1941   Germany invades Crete by air.
1942   Japan completes the conquest of Burma.
1951   During the Korean War, U.S. Air Force Captain James Jabara becomes the first jet air ace in history.
1961   A white mob attacks civil rights activists in Montgomery, Alabama.
1969   In South Vietnam, troops of the 101st Airborne Division reach the top of Hill 937 after nine days of fighting entrenched North Vietnamese forces.
1970   100,000 people march in New York, supporting U.S. policies in Vietnam.
Born on May 20
1663   William Bradford, printer.
1750   Stephen Girard, American financier and philanthropist.
1768   Dolley Madison, first lady of President James Madison.
1799   Honore de Balzac, French novelist (The Human Comedy, Lost Illusions).
1806   John Stuart Mill, British philospher and economist.
1818   William George Fargo, one of the founders of Wells, Fargo & Co.
1882   Sigrid Undset, Norwegian novelist (Kristin Lavransdatter).
1908   Jimmy Stewart, actor (It’s a Wonderful Life, Mr Smith Goes to Washington).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.eBhWLXrM.dpuf

 

 

today’s holiday: Garland Day


Garland Day

On Old May Day, the children of the Dorset fishing village of Abbotsbury still “bring in the May” by carrying garlands from door to door and receiving gifts in return. Each garland is constructed over a frame and supported by a broomstick, which is carried by two young people around the village. Later, the garlands are laid at the base of the local war memorial. At one time this was an important festival marking the beginning of the fishing season: fishermen rowed out to sea after dark and tossed the garlands to the waves with prayers for a safe and plentiful fishing season. More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Monday, May 4th, 2015 : St. Florian


word: scruple Definition


scruple

Definition: (noun) An uneasy feeling arising from conscience or principle that tends to hinder action.
Synonyms: misgiving, qualm
Usage: Lady Macbeth is impatient with her husband’s scruples and goads him into killing the king. Discuss.

Saint of the Day for Sunday, April 19th, 2015: St. Alphege


Image of St. Alphege

St. Alphege

Archbishop and “the First Martyr of Canterbury.” He was born in 953 and became a monk in the Deerhurst Monastery in Gloucester, England, asking after a few years to become a hermit. He received … continue reading

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today’s picture: The ‘Unsinkable’ Titanic



The ‘Unsinkable’ Titanic
The White Star Line’s Titanic–shown here departing Southhampton, England, on her maiden voyage to New York on April 10, 1912–struck an iceberg at 11:40 p.m. on April 14, 1912. The collision opened five forward compartments along the starboard side. At 2:20 a.m., two hours and 40 minutes after impact, the magnificent ship once thought to be unsinkable disappeared beneath the sea with the loss of about 1,522 lives. Because there were lifeboats for only half those on board, only 705 passengers and crew survived the disaster. Among the survivors was J. Bruce Ismay, president of the White Star Line, who telegraphed his New York office, ‘Deeply regret advise you Titanic sank this morning after collision with iceberg, resulting in serious loss of life. Full particulars later.’ – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.qnx3ouxV.dpuf

this day in the yesteryear: Henry V Becomes King of England (1413)


Henry V Becomes King of England (1413)

Henry was knighted by Richard II in 1399 and created prince of Wales when his father, Henry IV, usurped the throne the same year. Although his early recklessness was celebrated—and probably exaggerated—by Shakespeare, Henry became a great popular hero. He lifted England from the near anarchy of his father’s reign to civil order and a high spirit of nationalism. His main interest, however, was in gaining control of lands in France—lands that he sincerely believed to be his right. Did he succeed? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Tichborne Dole (2015)


Tichborne Dole (2015)

The custom of handing out a dole, or allotment of flour, to the village poor in Tichborne, Hampshire, England, dates back to the 12th or 13th century. Lady Mabella Tichborne, who was on her deathbed at the time, begged her husband to grant her enough land to provide an annual bounty of bread to the poor, who were suffering from a recent failure of the wheat crop. On March 25, or Lady Day, each year, villagers in need of assistance gather at the porch of Tichborne House to claim their portion of the gift: a gallon of flour for adults, half as much for children. More… Discuss

Human Civilization: Magna Carta Copy Found in Scrapbook


Magna Carta Copy Found in Scrapbook

A previously unknown version of the Magna Carta—the most famous document in British constitutional history—has been found tucked in a scrapbook by an archivist in the British town of Sandwich. The discovery comes just days after four surviving copies of the 1215 Magna Carta went on display in London. The Magna Carta, issued in 1215 by King John of England, asserted that no one, not even the king, was above the law. The newly found version appears to have been published under King Edward I in 1300. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Finnish Sliding Festival (2015)


Finnish Sliding Festival (2015)

Patterned after the traditional event in Finland that celebrates Shrove Tuesday before the beginning of Lent, the Finnish Sliding Festival, or Laskiainen, has been held in White, Minnesota, every winter for more than 50 years. It features two large ice slides, which are constructed at the edge of Loon Lake. People bring their sleds or toboggans for an exciting ride down the slide onto the frozen lake. Other activities at the weekend event include log-sawing contests, Finnish music and dance performances, and traditional Finnish foods such as oven pancakes and pea soup. More… Discuss

The Salic Law


The Salic Law

The Salic law was the rule of succession in some royal and noble European families that forbid females to succeed to certain titles or offices in the family. It likely came from the Salian Franks, who prohibited women from succeeding to the throne. The rule was most prominently enforced by the house of Valois and the succeeding house of Bourbon in France and was involved in the rivalry of Stephen and Matilda for the English throne. What impact did it have when Victoria became queen of England? More… Discuss

Quotation: Ignorance… is a painless evil; so, I should think, is dirt, considering the merry faces that go along with it. George Eliot


Ignorance… is a painless evil; so, I should think, is dirt, considering the merry faces that go along with it.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Saint of the Day for Friday, January 9th, 2015: St. Adrian, Abbot


Image of St. Adrian, Abbot

St. Adrian, Abbot

Born in Africa, Adrian became abbot of the monastery at Nerida, near Naples. He declined an appointment as archbishop of Canterbury, but accompanied St. Theodore to England when the latter was … continue reading

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The Sonnet


The Sonnet

A sonnet is a poem with 14 lines, invented in 13th-century Italy and perfected by Petrarch. The Italian sonnet is divided into an octave and a sestet. The octave states a problem, and the sestet gives its resolution, with a clear break between the two sections. When the sonnet reached England in the 16th century—chiefly through translations of Petrarch’s works—poets changed its meter, rhyme scheme, and line grouping, creating the Elizabethan sonnet. What is the origin of the term “sonnet”? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Eton Wall Game


Eton Wall Game

Every year on St. Andrew’s Day, England‘s prestigious Eton College holds the famous Eton Wall Game, a variety of rugby that has its own highly technical rules and is different from all other forms of the game. The object of the game is to win goals by maneuvering the ball into the opposing team’s “calx,” designated by a chalk line on a garden wall at one end of the field and by a mark on a tree at the other. The game is made up of many scrimmages along the brick wall that marks off the college athletic field for which the game is named, and goals are almost never scored. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Thanksgiving (U.S.)


Thanksgiving (U.S.)

The first American Thanksgiving was entirely religious and took place on December 4, 1619, but most Americans think of the first “official” Thanksgiving as the one that took place at Plymouth Colony in October 1621, a year after the Pilgrims first landed on the New England coast. Today, Thanksgiving is a time for family reunions and traditions, most of which center around the preparation of an elaborate meal featuring turkey and a dozen or so accompanying dishes. The widespread sales that begin in stores the next day mark the start of the Christmas shopping season. More… Discuss

 

today’s birthday: Frances Hodgson Burnett (1849)


Frances Hodgson Burnett (1849)

Burnett, a British-American playwright and author, began writing professionally in her late teens in order to help support her struggling family. Her stories were initially printed in magazines, and her first novel was published in 1877. Her books for adults were well received, but it was her children’s novels—particularly Little Lord Fauntleroy and The Secret Garden—that brought Burnett her greatest and most enduring success. How did her writings influence the fashions of the day? More… Discuss

Robin Hood


Robin Hood

This legendary hero of 12th-century England is celebrated for robbing the rich to help the poor. Chivalrous, manly, fair, and always ready for a joke, Hood reflected many of the ideals of the English yeoman. He is said to have lived in Sherwood Forest with Little John, Friar Tuck, Maid Marion, and his band and is the hero of numerous Middle English ballads and many later stories and plays. There is, however, no evidence that he was an actual historical figure. In what text is he first mentioned? More… Discuss

todays holiday: Plebeian Games


Plebeian Games

The Roman leader Flaminius is thought to have instituted the Plebeian Games in 220 BCE. They originally may have been held in the Circus Flaminius, which he built. Later, they may have moved to the Circus Maximus, a huge open arena between the Palatine and Aventine hills. The Games were dedicated to Jupiter, one of whose feast days was November 13, and included horse and chariot races and contests that involved running, boxing, and wrestling. The festival lasted from November 4-17, and its first nine days were devoted to theatrical performances. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Edward III of England (1312)


Edward III of England (1312)

Crowned at age 14, after his mother helped her lover, Roger de Mortimer, depose his father, Edward III reigned over England for 50 years. He wielded little power at first but after a few years seized the reins of government, had Mortimer executed, and forced his mother into retirement. Edward’s long reign saw the ravages of the Black Death as well as vital developments in legislature and government. In 1337, he laid claim to the French crown, provoking what century-long conflict? More… Discuss

The Weeping Willow


The Weeping Willow

Easily recognized by its long drooping branches and leaves, the weeping willow belongs to the Salicaceae family of deciduous trees and shrubs. It is native to China, but, as willow cuttings generally take root quite easily, it has been cultivated elsewhere for millennia. Legend has it that all of England‘s weeping willows are descended from a cutting sent to Lady Suffolk from Spain. Though it is widely cultivated for ornamental purposes, the weeping willow is used by some to serve what function? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: King James II of England (1633)


King James II of England (1633)

King James II was the last Catholic monarch to rule over England, Scotland, and Ireland, reigning from 1685 to 1688. The birth of his son, a possible Catholic heir, brought about the Glorious Revolution, in which Protestants deposed James in favor of Mary II and William of Orange. The belief that James was the legitimate ruler became known as Jacobitism, and Jacobites thereafter attempted to restore the Stuart line to the thrones of England and Scotland. Who protected James when he fled England? More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Sunday, October 12th, 2014: St. Wilfrid


today’s birthday: Louis-Philippe of France (1773)


Louis-Philippe of France (1773)

Louis-Philippe was the last king to rule France, reigning from 1830 to 1848. A nobleman who joined the liberal opposition to kings Louis XVIII and Charles X, he was made lieutenant general of the realm during the July Revolution of 1830 and then king. At first, he was much loved and called the “Citizen King,” but his increasingly autocratic rule as well as economic woes diminished his popularity. Faced with impending civil war, he abdicated and fled to England. How did he get there? More… Discuss

story: Arboretum


Arboretum

Fontana - Arboretum Trsteno

Fontana – Arboretum Trsteno (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

An arboretum is a botanical garden primarily devoted to trees and other woody plants that are cultivated for scientific, educational, and ornamental purposes. The plants are labeled with their common and scientific names, and they are arranged in cultural or habitat groups, such as tropical, desert, and aquatic. One of the world’s oldest arboretums is the Trsteno Arboretum, near Dubrovnik in Croatia. What arboretum in England helped inspire the design for New York City’s Central Park? More… Discuss

 

article: (Hula) Hooping Through History


(Hula) Hooping Through History

Hoops, originally made from stiff grasses and other natural materials, have been popular toys for centuries—long before “hula” was added to their name in the 18th century. Doctors in medieval England blamed many injuries on a recreational “hooping” fad. Another craze surfaced in the 1950s, when the Wham-O company released its plastic hoop. Today, hoops have found renewed popularity among adults who perform hoop dances or enjoy hooping at concerts. What do you need to make your own hula hoop? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Horn Dance


Horn Dance

The ancient Horn Dance, believed by many to have originated in Norman times or before, is performed at Abbots Bromley, a small village in Staffordshire, England, as part of the Wakes Monday celebration each year. A dozen local men, ranging in age from 12 to more than 50, dress in 16th-century foresters’ costumes. Six of them carry reindeer antlers mounted on short wooden sticks. The men dance their way around the parish boundaries, stopping to perform at homes and farms along the way. There is also a Hobby Horse, a man dressed as Maid Marian, a Fool, and a young archer. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: King Richard I of England (1157)


King Richard I of England (1157)

Among the few kings of England remembered by reputation, not number, Richard the Lionheart reigned from 1189 to 1199. After rebelling against his father, Henry II, Richard rose to the throne upon Henry’s death. He set out on the Third Crusade shortly after his coronation. Unable to capture the strongly fortified city of Jerusalem, Richard negotiated a treaty with Saladin that allowed Christian pilgrims access to its holy sites. How much time did Richard spend in England during his entire reign? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533)


Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533)

Queen Elizabeth, England‘s last Tudor monarch, came to the throne during a turbulent period in the nation’s history. Although she has been described as vain, miserly, and fickle, she was remarkably successful as queen. During her reign, England pursued a policy of expansionism in commerce and geographical exploration, defeating the Spanish Armada and becoming a major world power. Literature and the arts flourished during the period as well. To whom was the Queen married? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: First Transatlantic Telegraph Sent (1858)


First Transatlantic Telegraph Sent (1858)

After the introduction of the working telegraph in 1839, the idea that countries and continents could be connected by a communications network became an exciting possibility. A working telegraph could transmit in mere minutes messages that had once taken weeks to deliver by sea. England and France were linked by submarine cable in 1850, but it took several attempts over the next eight years before a lasting connection could be maintained across the Atlantic. How long was this cable operational? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Hurricane Supplication Day


Hurricane Supplication Day

Observed in the U.S. Virgin Islands—St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John—Hurricane Supplication Day marks the beginning of the hurricane season. Special church services are held to pray for safety from the storms that ravage these and other Caribbean islands. The custom probably dates back to the “rogation” ceremonies (from the word rogare, meaning “to beg or supplicate”), which began in fifth-century England. Rogations usually followed a frightening series of storms, earthquakes, or other natural disasters. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Henry Knox (1750)


Henry Knox (1750)

A bookseller, Knox became active in the colonial militia in the lead-up to the American Revolution. Upon the outbreak of war with England, he volunteered for the revolutionary forces and soon proved himself a capable tactician and leader. He was so highly regarded that he was chosen to succeed George Washington as commander of the army at the war’s end and later served as the first US secretary of war. What did Knox accidentally swallow that caused an infection that claimed his life? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Mary Queen of Scots Is Deposed (1567)


Mary Queen of Scots Is Deposed (1567)

Mary Stuart was Queen of Scotland from 1542 to 1567. She was forced to abdicate the throne after her husband, Lord Darnley, was murdered and she was implicated in the plot. Mary then fled to England, where she faced a murder inquiry and became a prisoner of the English government. After conspiracies to put her on the throne of England were uncovered, she was tried for treason and ultimately beheaded. Some say her executioners asked for her forgiveness. What is she said to have replied? More… Discuss

Princess Caraboo


Princess Caraboo

“Princess Caraboo” was a famous imposter in 19th-century England. Her real-name was Mary Baker, and she was a cobbler’s daughter. She invented a fictitious language and created an exotic persona, claiming to be Princess Caraboo from the island of Javasu. She alleged that she had been captured by pirates but managed to jump from their ship and swim to safety. For several weeks, Princess Caraboo enjoyed the hospitality and company of local society. How was her true identity finally uncovered? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Tynwald Ceremony


Tynwald Ceremony

The Isle of Man, located off the coast of England in the Irish Sea, was once the property of the Vikings. It was here that they established their custom of holding an open-air court for the settling of disputes and the passing of laws. Today, the Tynwald Ceremony—whose name comes from the Norse Thing vollr, meaning a fenced open parliament—is held at St. John’s on Tynwald Hill on July 5, when the chief justice reads a brief summary of every bill that has been passed during the year—first in English, and then in Manx, the old language of the island. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Henry VIII of England (1491)


Henry VIII of England (1491)

Henry VIII, the second monarch of the Tudor dynasty, was King of England from 1509 until his death in 1547. Notable events during his reign include the break with Rome and establishment of the independent Church of England, the dissolution of the monasteries, and the union of England and Wales. However, he is best remembered for his turbulent love life—he was married six times—and for the callous way he ended two of his marriages—having his wives beheaded. What were the fates of the other four? More… Discuss

Eleanor of Aquitaine


Eleanor of Aquitaine

Eleanor was the queen consort of Louis VII of France and then of Henry II of England and mother of two kings of England, Richard I and John. She established a court at Poitiers noted for its cultivation of the concept of courtly love and later helped Richard secure the throne. When he was held captive in Europe, she forestalled John’s plots against him and worked to collect ransom for his release. She later facilitated the brothers’ reconciliation. Who was she rumored to have poisoned? More… Discuss

quotation: Henry Fielding


LOVE: A word properly applied to our delight in particular kinds of food; sometimes metaphorically spoken of the favorite objects of all our appetites.

Henry Fielding (1707-1754) Discuss

Phillips Exeter Academy


Phillips Exeter Academy

Exeter is one of the preeminent boarding schools in the world, along with Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, and Eton College in England. Famous for its demanding and rigorous academics, Exeter also boasts one of the largest endowments of any secondary school in the US. Graduates typically matriculate to elite colleges, a tradition that has solidified the school’s long-standing relationships with Ivy League and other prestigious universities. Who are some of the academy’s famous alumni? More… Discuss

Life, poetic thought by George-B (my poetry collection ©ALWAYS)


Life, poetic thought by George-B

I’m strong in my weakness
I’m weak in my strength

I fear no change, I know what to expect
The closer the goals, the longer it takes and
The further it gets and yet
What’s to come, has come and passed,
In the past, like a turning wheel or
A turning page, one of many identical ones,
or
The wind prevailing from the South-West
Most of the time,
I know what’s to come,
From what has been passed…

my strength in my weakness,
my weakness in strength, and yet
still time to live with no regret,
knowing that giving was by far
the conquest

article: The Baths of Bath


The Baths of Bath

Bath is a city in southwest England famous for its baths, which are fed by the only natural hot springs in the country and which some believe have curative properties. The Romans established the city as Aquae Sulis in the first century, building elaborate, lead-lined baths with heating and cooling systems. These were rediscovered in 1755, by which time Bath, as it had since become known, had revived as a spa and become a resort city for the wealthy. What was Jane Austen‘s connection to Bath? More… Discuss

Saint of the Day June 7, 2014St. Willibald


Saint of the Day

Image of St. Willibald

St. Willibald

Bishop and missionary. A native of Wessex, England, he was the brother of Sts. Winebald and Walburga and was related through his mother to the great St. Boniface. After studying in a monastery in … continue reading

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Big Ben history and chimes!


Big Ben

Big Ben is the nickname of the clock tower at the Palace of Westminster in London. Famous for its accuracy, the clock rings in the new year in England.

Originally, only the Great Bell—the largest bell in the tower—was called “Big Ben,” but eventually, the moniker was applied to the clock itself and then to the entire tower. In 2012, the iconic British landmark was officially renamed Elizabeth Tower, in honor of Queen Elizabeth’s Diamond Jubilee. Who is generally accepted as the real-life “Ben”? More… Discuss

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Saint of the Day for Thursday, June 5th, 2014: St. Boniface of Mainz


Saint of the Day

Image of St. Boniface of Mainz

St. Boniface of Mainz

Winfrith had expected to return to England from Friesland (in what is now Holland) in triumph. He had left the land where he was a respected scholar, teacher, and priest because he was convinced he … continue reading

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quotation: “The whirligig of time brings in his revenges.” William Shakespeare


The whirligig of time brings in his revenges.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

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7 buruieni numai bune de inclus în meniu – Yahoo Ştiri România


7 buruieni numai bune de inclus în meniu – Yahoo Ştiri România.

Plantain. In childhood, we treat abrasions, scratches and bruises plantain leaves freshly picked. This plant can be used in the kitchen but in salads, stews and soups. However, in addition to leaves, inflorescence and seeds are edible. Seeds, dried and ground are a rich source of fiber and are effective in the treatment of constipation. “

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today’s holiday: Shick-Shack Day


Shick-Shack Day

The Oxford English Dictionary suggests that this day takes its name from a corruption of a derogatory term for Protestants who did not follow the doctrines of the Church of England. It was later applied to those who did not wear the traditional sprig of oak on May 29, or Royal Oak Day—the birthday of Charles II, and the day in 1660 on which he made his entry into London as king. Shick-shack has since become synonymous with the oak-apple or sprig of oak itself, and May 29 is celebrated in memory of the restoration of King Charles and his preservation in the Royal Oak. More… Discuss

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