Tag Archives: Charles Dickens

quotation: Charles Dickens


Although a skillful flatterer is a most delightful companion if you can keep him all to yourself, his taste becomes very doubtful when he takes to complimenting other people.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

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quotation: Louisa May Alcott


Let my name stand among those who are willing to bear ridicule and reproach for the truth’s sake, and so earn some right to rejoice when the victory is won.

Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888) Discuss

QUOTATION: P. G. Wodehouse


Success comes to a writer, as a rule, so gradually that it is always something of a shock to him to look back and realize the heights to which he has climbed.P. G. Wodehouse (1881-1975) Discuss

Quotation: Ignorance… is a painless evil; so, I should think, is dirt, considering the merry faces that go along with it. George Eliot


Ignorance… is a painless evil; so, I should think, is dirt, considering the merry faces that go along with it.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

today holiday: Tolling the Devil’s Knell (2014)


Tolling the Devil’s Knell (2014)

To celebrate the birth of Christ and the death of the Devil, All Saints Minster Church in Dewsbury, Yorkshire, rings its bell the same number of times as the number of the year (for example, 2,014 times in 2014) on Christmas Eve. The tolling starts at 11:00 PM, stops during the church service from midnight to 12:45, and then resumes until the years have been tolled away. The custom has been going on for almost 700 years. The bell has been called “Black Tom of Soothill” since the 13th century, and Tolling Black Tom is supposed to keep the parish safe from the Devil for another 12 months. More… Discuss

Isaac Stern – Edouard Lalo – Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21: great compositions/performances


Isaac Stern – Edouard Lalo – Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21

Quotation: Minds, like bodies, will often fall into a pimpled, ill-conditioned state from mere excess of comfort. Charles Dickens


Minds, like bodies, will often fall into a pimpled, ill-conditioned state from mere excess of comfort.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

quotation: Charles Dickens — “…it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.”)


It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done;

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

quotation: There is a wisdom of the head, and… a wisdom of the heart. Charles Dickens


There is a wisdom of the head, and… a wisdom of the heart.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

today’s birthday: William Makepeace Thackeray (1811)


William Makepeace Thackeray (1811)

Thackeray was an English novelist and satirist. In his lifetime, he was seen as the only possible rival of Charles Dickens for his pictures of contemporary life. Thackeray achieved widespread popularity in 1848 with Book of Snobs, but he is best known for another of his novels published that year, Vanity Fair, a satirical panorama of upper-middle-class London life in the early 19th century. Who were Charles James Yellowplush, Michael Angelo Titmarsh, and George Savage Fitz-Boodle? More… Discuss

QUOTATION: Honore de Balzac


It is easier to be a lover than a husband for the simple reason that it is more difficult to be witty every day than to say pretty things from time to time.

Honore de Balzac (1799-1850) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Charles Dickens – “I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free.”


I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

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Quotation: Charles Dickens


Pride is one of the seven deadly sins; but it cannot be the pride of a mother in her children, for that is a compound of two cardinal virtues—faith and hope.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

Quotation: Charles Dickens


Throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

Quotation: Charles Dickens about destiny


No man knocks himself down; if his destiny knocks him down, his destiny must pick him up again.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

 

Quotation: Charles Dickens about character


Never … be mean in anything; never be false; never be cruel. Avoid those three vices … and I can always be hopeful of you.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

Quotation: Charles Dickens


When I talk of eyes, the stars come out! Whose eyes are they? If they are angels’ eyes, why do they look down here and see good men hurt, and only wink and sparkle all the night?

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

 

Quotation: Charles Dickens


We are not rich in the bank, but we have always prospered, and we have quite enough. I never walk out with my husband but I hear the people bless him … I never lie down at night but I know that in the course of that day he has alleviated pain and soothed some fellow-creature in the time of need … Is not this to be rich?

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

 

Quotation: Charles Dickens on liberal education


I have been, as the phrase is, liberally educated, and am fit for nothing.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

 

Quotation: Charles Dickens


Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There’s no better rule.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

 

Quotation: Charles Dickens on expectations


It is a hopeless endeavor to attract people to a theater unless they can be first brought to believe that they will never get into it.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

Quotation: Charles Dickens on references of sorts…such as wealth…


Money and goods are certainly the best of references.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

Quotation: Charles Dickens on days memorable


That was a memorable day to me, for it made great changes in me. But, it is the same with any life. Imagine one selected day struck out of it, and think how different its course would have been.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

Quotation: Charles Dickens On trust


“Always suspect everybody.” That’s the maxim to go through life with!

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

Quotation: Charles Dickens on talkers and doers


There are talkers enough among us; I’ll be one of the doers.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

Quotation: Charles Dickens


It was on one of those mornings, common in early spring, when the year, fickle and changeable in its youth like all other created things, is undecided whether to step backward into winter or forward into summer.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

Quotation: Charles Dickens on Charity and Justice


Charity begins at home, and justice begins next door.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

Wilkins Micawber (Some charater comes to life…and what a life!)


Wilkins Micawber

Micawber is a character from Charles Dickens’s 1850 novel David Copperfield. Though eternally optimistic, he persistently falls behind financially. As a result, he is sent to a debtor’s prison, much like Dickens’s father, the real-life inspiration for Micawber. He eventually exposes his employer, Uriah Heep, as a criminal, and is able to start a new life in Australia. One of Micawber’s memorable quotes pertaining to personal finance is known as the Micawber Principle. What is it? More… Discuss

Charles Dickens: on human creatures’ miraculous property of Uniqueness


A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

This day in History: Copyright Act of 1790 Signed into US Law (1790)


Copyright Act of 1790 Signed into US Law (1790)

After the US Constitution was ratified in 1788, one of the first issues that the fledgling government faced was the lack of a copyright law. Without it, Congress would be swamped with individual petitions for protection from piracy. Modeled on Britain’s Statute of Anne, the Copyright Act of 1790 was soon signed into law by President Washington. Instituted to encourage learning by securing US authors the sole rights to their work for 14-year periods, it drew what complaint from Charles Dickens? More… Discuss

English: The US Copyright Act of 1790 reprinte...

English: The US Copyright Act of 1790 reprinted in the Colombian Centinel, published 17 July 1790. Full title: “An act for the encouragement of learning by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned.” Out of copyright. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Quotation of the Day: Charles Dickens – on Injustice As “Insufferable injury”


The world would do well to reflect, that injustice is in itself, to every generous and properly constituted mind, an injury, of all others the most insufferable, the most torturing, and the most hard to bear.”

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)

Today’s Quotation: Charles Dickens – On Responsibility and Work Ethic


I never could have done what I have done, without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without the determination to concentrate myself on one object at a time.
(The quotation is from David Copperfield, Ch 42, “Mischief:”)

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

Quotation of the Day: Charles Dickens – About Human Social Relations


It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss
The above quote comes from the story entitled, Bleak House written in 1853: Charles Dickens: Bleak House

28. CHAPTER XXVIII: The Ironmaster: Read the novel at Bleak House—complete story. (Please thank www.literaturepage.come for the above quote in context and the complete story.)

 


Remedy to this HUMAN shortcoming: Let’s agree to disagree without being disagreable…Or else! (also: not every disagreement is bad enough to war (war: an extreme ideologico-economical incongruence that can be appeased only by eliminating the incongruence) over it anyway, or it shouldn’t… You know?)

Today’s Birthday: Henry Fielding (1707)


Henry Fielding (1707)

Born 22 April 1707(1707-04-22)
Sharpham, Glastonbury, Somerset, England
Died 8 October 1754(1754-10-08) (aged 47)
Lisbon, Portugal
Pen name Captain Hercules Vinegar“, also some works published anonymously
Occupation Novelist, dramatist
Nationality English
Period 1728–54
Genres satire, picaresque
Literary movement Enlightenment, Augustan Age
Relative(s) Sara Banerji (1900s author)

Fielding was an English novelist and dramatist known for his humor and satire. He settled in London in 1729 and began writing comedies, farces, and burlesques, including Tom Thumb. Two of his satires attacked the Walpole government and provoked the Licensing Act of 1737, which initiated censorship of the stage and ended his career as a playwright. He thereupon turned to writing novels, publishing his most popular work, Tom Jones, in 1749. Why did he travel to Portugal in 1754? More… Discuss