Category Archives: Photography

picture of the day, The San Francisco Earthquake



The San Francisco Earthquake

A massive earthquake felt from Oregon to Los Angeles and as far inland as Nevada jolted San Francisco, Calif., at 5:12 a.m. on April 18, 1906. The earthquake caused severe damage and loss of life in the San Francisco Bay area, and a three-day fire spawned by the shaking reduced 4.7 square miles of the city to blackened ruins. Military officials estimated $400 million of damage and a total of 700-800 killed. Modern research estimates that closer to 3,000 of San Francisco’s 400,000 inhabitants lost their lives.

The photo captures a painter sitting amid earthquake rubble painting a picture of ruins of large building after the earthquake.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.kTuHwCsJ.dpuf

today’s picture: The Little Tramp



The Little Tramp

Producer, director, composer and silent movie comedian Charlie Chaplin was born in London on April 16, 1889, into a family of music hall performers. Visiting America with a touring company in 1913, Chaplin was cast in his first film, “Making a Living”. Although historians are not certain when the ‘little tramp’ was created, Chaplin remains most readily identified with that beloved character. This photo, showing Chaplin with child star Jackie Coogan, is from the sentimental 1921 film “The Kid”. Chaplin died in Corsier-sur-Vevey, Switzerland, on December 25, 1977.

Image: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.N2uNhh7X.dpuf

today’s picture: Assassination of Abraham Lincoln



Assassination of Abraham Lincoln
On the evening of Good Friday, April 14, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln, accompanied by his wife and a young couple, went to Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C., to see a popular play, Our American Cousin. Just after 10 p.m., actor and Southern sympathizer John Wilkes Booth burst into the presidential box and shot Lincoln behind the ear. Booth leaped to the stage, breaking his left leg on impact, and escaped through a side door. Lincoln was carried to a nearby house where he remained unconscious until his death at 7:22 the following morning. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, who had kept vigil at Lincoln’s bedside, said, ‘Now he belongs to the ages.’

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.iLrCLcXk.dpuf

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today’s picture: Death of Franklin Roosevelt (Funeral Procession)



Death of Franklin Roosevelt
President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (b. 1882) died of a cerebral hemorrhage at 5:48 p.m. on April 12, 1945. The 63-year-old president had been at Warm Springs, Georgia, since March 28, resting from the rigors of leading a nation at war. Roosevelt, left paralyzed by polio in 1921, was elected to the nation’s highest office four times and is judged by historians to be among the greatest American presidents. In this photograph, taken on April 24, 1945, Roosevelt’s funeral procession moves through the streets of Washington, D.C., on its way to burial at the Roosevelt family home in Hyde Park, New York.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.eTRUsBuw.dpuf

today’s picture: Jackie Robinson


Breaking Baseball’s Color Line

In August 1945, Brooklyn Dodgers’ general manager Branch Rickey first approached Jackie Robinson, an outstanding athlete then playing baseball in the Negro leagues, to participate in the “great experiment” of integrating the major leagues. After a season in the minors, Robinson officially broke baseball’s color barrier when he put on Dodgers uniform No. 42 in April 1947. In spite of intense pressure and hostility, Robinson’s athletic abilities earned him the Rookie of the Year Award in 1947. When Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers, talented black athletes toiled in relative obscurity in the Negro leagues despite the exciting caliber of their play.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.01mZYd7T.dpuf

today’s picture: Marian Anderson Sings



Marian Anderson Sings
In early 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution denied internationally famed contralto Marian Anderson the opportunity to sing at Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C., because of her race. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was so dismayed by the injustice that she resigned her own D.A.R. membership in protest. On Easter Sunday, April 9, Anderson, at the invitation of Secretary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes, sang a triumphant outdoor concert at the Lincoln Memorial before a crowd of 75,000 and a radio audience of millions.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.4Eg64H7Q.dpuf

today’s picture



WPA Approved by Congress
President Franklin Roosevelt proposed the Works Progress Administration (WPA) during the Great Depression of the 1930s when almost 25 percent of Americans were unemployed. Approved by Congress on April 8, 1935, the WPA created low-paying federal jobs to provide immediate relief. The WPA put 8.5 million jobless to work on projects as diverse as constructing highways, bridges and public buildings to arts programs like the Federal Writers’ Project. This photograph, taken in El Cerrito, San Miguel County, New Mexico, shows WPA laborers at work on a road project.

Photo: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.rCZ1yjiO.dpuf

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today’s image: Catacombs, Paris (Nadar (Gaspard-Félix Tournachon) (French, 1820–1910))


Nadar (Gaspard-Félix Tournachon). Catacombs, Paris. 1861
Nadar (Gaspard-Félix Tournachon)
(French, 1820–1910)

Catacombs, Paris

Date:
1861
Medium:
Albumen silver print from a glass negative
Dimensions:
9 7/16 x 7 13/16″ (24 x 19.8 cm)
Credit Line:
Gift of Paul F. Walter
MoMA Number:
90.1988

today’s picture: Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.



Civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., was fatally shot as he stood outside the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., on April 4, 1968. The 39-year-old minister, known for preaching nonviolence in the crusade for civil rights, was in Memphis in support of striking city sanitation workers. Escaped convict James Earl Ray was convicted of King’s murder but later recanted his confession. In spite of lingering controversy surrounding his guilt, Ray served a life sentence for the crime until his death in 1998.

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today’s picture: Royal Air Force Lieutenant David McIntyre



Royal Air Force Lieutenant David McIntyre and the Scottish Marquess of Clydesdale, flying two open-cockpit Westland aircraft, completed the first overflight and aerial photographic survey of Mount Everest on April 3, 1933. The British Mount Everest team, depicted here in a painting by Ron Weil, battled extreme cold and high winds as they photographed the previously unknown crest of the 29,028-foot peak. – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.vsuOShkN.dpuf

picture of the day



At 8:30 p.m. on April 2, 1917, President Woodrow Wilson, shown here delivering his message before a joint session of Congress, recommended that a state of war be declared between the United States and the imperial German government. Realizing that the war looming ahead would be a costly one, Wilson said, ‘the day has come when America is privileged to spend her blood and her might for the principles that gave her birth and happiness and the peace which she has treasured.’ – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.uiOuNhB2.dpuf

today’s image: Opening of the Eiffel Tower



Opening of the Eiffel Tower

The Eiffel Tower officially opened to the public on March 31, 1889. Constructed of 7,000 tons of iron and steel, the 984-foot structure was designed by Alexandre Gustave Eiffel for the Paris Exhibition of 1889, commemorating the centennial of the French Revolution. The price for the Eiffel Tower was more than $1 million, but fees for the year 1889 alone nearly recouped the cost. Fifty-five years later, plans by Hitler to leave the tower and much of Paris a smoking ruin were foiled by an unlikely hero, Dietrich von Choltitz.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.L1mJqReA.dpuf

today’s image



Weary soldiers from the 28th Infantry Division assemble in Bastogne on December 20, 1944, after retreating from Wiltz.. These men fought against powerful German forces until their ammunition was exhausted.

Photo: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.x784dthc.dpuf

A WAVE (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service)



A WAVE (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) Specialist (Photographer) 3rd Class salutes as she stands among the springtime cherry blossoms near the Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C., during World War II.

Photo: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.W9CeuLfV.dpuf

Moulin Rouge at Montmartre in Paris, 1923 — Classic Pics (@classicepics)


Roses are blue: Amazing sketch from my SketchGuru


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Today’s beautiful rose: Amazing sketch from my SketchGuru


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today’s image: USS Langley



USS Langley

On March 20, 1922, the 11,500-ton Langley was commissioned into the U.S. Navy as America’s first aircraft carrier. Langley was not regarded as a beautiful ship. Her flight deck was 533 feet long and 64 feet wide with an open-sided hanger deck, inspiring the nickname ‘the Old Covered Wagon.’ Under the leadership of Commander Kenneth Whiting, Langley served as a base for reconnaissance aircraft and a laboratory to develop new procedures for launching and recovering planes, such as the use of cross-deck arresting wires to brake incoming aircraft. This photograph shows a Douglas DT-2 airplane taking off from her flight deck.

Photo: U.S. Naval Historical Center

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.S8tJEV0v.dpuf

today’s Birthday: Ovid (43 BCE)


Ovid (43 BCE)

Publius Ovidius Naso, a Roman poet better known as Ovid, is ranked alongside Virgil, Horace, and others as one of the canonical poets of Latin literature. He was a great storyteller whose writings generally deal with the themes of love, mythology, and exile. No other Latin poet wrote so naturally in verse or with such sustained wit, and his works had a decisive influence on European art and literature for centuries. Why did Augustus banish Ovid in 8 CE? More… Discuss

today’s image: Wright 1901 Glider


Wright 1901 Glider

Above the dunes at Kitty Hawk, Orville Wright pilots the Wright 1901 glider into the same stiff winds that threaten to dislodge the hats of two spectators watching the flight from below.

Photo: Library of Congress

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today’s picture: Amos Two Bulls



Amos Two Bulls

Amos Two Bulls, a Sioux Indian from Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, poses for photographer Gertrude K?sebier in 1901.

Photo: Library of Congress

today’s picture: Union General William T. Sherman



Union General William T. Sherman
George N. Barnard, official photographer of the Chief Engineer’s Office, photographed Union General William T. Sherman on horseback at Federal Fort No. 7 in Atlanta, Georgia sometime between September and November 1864. After forcing General John B. Hood to abandon the munitions center of the Confederacy, Sherman remained in Atlanta, resting his war-worn men and accumulating supplies, for nearly two and a half months.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day?podMonth=3&podDay=17&pod=GO#sthash.bgTRhxY6.dpuf

today’s picture: Nicholas II, Czar of Russia


Nicholas II, Czar of Russia, was forced to sign a document of abdication on March 16, 1917, after being brought down by political unrest and widespread starvation stemming from Russia’s staggering losses in WWI. The czar, his wife Alexandra, their four daughters and son Alexis, heir to the throne, were held prisoner by the Bolsheviks for several months at Tsarskoye Selo palace near Petrograd. This photograph shows Nicholas II under guard in the park at Tsarskoye Selo. In August 1917, the family was transported to distant Siberia to prevent any attempt to restore them to the throne. In July 1918, the entire royal family was executed by local Bolsheviks.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.DNQhT1xd.dpuf

today’s picture: Germany Schaefer



Germany Schaefer
Herman A. ‘Germany’ Schaefer tries out the other side of the camera during the Washington Senators visit to play the New York Highlanders in April 1911. Shaefer, a versatile infielder and quick baserunner, played most of his career with the Detroit Tigers and the Washington Senators.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.6rdHYpqW.dpuf

today’s image: FDR’s Fireside Chats


FDR’s Fireside Chats

President Roosevelt makes his first Sunday evening fireside chats on March 12, 1933. Roosevelt gave 31 chats from March 1933 and June 1944 to explain his policies to the public via radio broadcasts. This photo was taken during his April 28, 1935 broadcast in Washington, D.C.

Photo: Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.tt4hvGRN.dpuf

From Across the Street: Amazing sketch from my SketchGuru, (My Art Collection)


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I’ve been using SketchGuru and I think you might like it. Check out from your Android phone:

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Leg muscles of the first perfect 10 in Olympic history, at age 14. Nadia Comaneci.— Classic Pics (@classicepics)


today’s image: Grant’s Commission On March 9, 1864,



Grant’s Commission On March 9, 1864,

President Abraham Lincoln officially commissioned Ulysses S. Grant the first Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army since George Washington. In the face of repeated defeats on the eastern front of the war, Grant had been a consistent source of good news — and good generalship — in the West. ‘I can’t spare this man,’ Lincoln said, ‘he fights.’

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.c109lrM9.dpuf

today’s image: The Monitor vs. the Merrimack (Image Published by Currier & Ives, c1862 (Library of Congress))



The Monitor vs. the Merrimack

Two armored ships face off for the first time as the turreted Union ironclad Monitor engages Virginia — a Confederate casemate ram built on the salvaged hull of the former Union steam frigate Merrimack — at the Battle of Hampton Roads on March 9, 1862.

Image Published by Currier & Ives, c1862 (Library of Congress)

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.MXtBXT1r.dpuf

Historic Pics: The Sphinx, circa 1850 — Classic Pics (@classicepics)


this pressed: City reshaped: up and down (Seattle Old Town)


SEATTLE HAD BIG DREAMS.The famed Seattle Spirit provided the money, muscle and moxie for the city’s remarkable transformation from boomtown to metropolis; it also encouraged dreamers — mostly visionaries and a few schemers — who had even grander ideas for the future.

From building skyscrapers to drilling tunnels, cutting away hillsides or bridging the lakes, their great notions soon changed the entire cityscape.

Seattle was not alone in its ambitions, as colossal engineering projects like the Panama Canal gave the world notice of America’s tremendous technological capabilities and “can do” spirit. But on a regional scale, the city’s projects were equally grandiose, if not occasionally outrageous.

Why not dig a ship canal from Elliott Bay to Lake Washington, fill in the lower half of Lake Union for more industrial space or build a giant commuter tunnel under First Hill? And while we’re at it, why not even get rid of all those hills blocking the city’s growth?

As taxpayers and politicians fought over how much it would cost, planners and builders forged ahead to redesign the city. Leading the way was R.H. Thomson, the intense city engineer who oversaw all municipal construction — from sewers and sidewalks to bridges and public buildings. A technical man with a streak of imagination, he let no natural obstacle stand in the way of completing the infrastructure of a great city.

via City reshaped: up and down.

Shop Nr. 2 McDonald: Amazing sketch from my SketchGuru


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today’s picture: Jackie Cochran and the Origin of the WASPs



Jackie Cochran and the Origin of the WASPs

It took three years for pilot Jacqueline ‘Jackie’ Cochran to convince the U.S. military that qualified women pilots could free men for combat duty by performing non-combat missions. Supported by Eleanor Roosevelt and Army aviation chief General Henry H. ‘Hap’ Arnold, Cochran’s goal was achieved in 1943 with the formation of the Women’s Air Force Service Pilots (WASPs). Before deactivation on December 20, 1944, 1,074 WASPs logged 60 million miles flying for the U.S. Army Air Forces.

This 1957 photo shows Jacqueline Cochran standing next to her plane, with Chuck Yeager and Bill Longhurst, at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

Image: Air Force Flight Test Center History Office

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.xS0xJgM1.dpuf

today’s image: Lewis Hine and Child Labor Reforms



Lewis Hine and Child Labor Reforms

In 1908, the National Child Labor Committee estimated that one of every four miners was a child between the ages of 7 and 16. Lewis W. Hine photographed these young Pennsylvania coal miners, who worked from dawn to dusk. Early-20th-century reformers crusaded against many social problems caused by America’s rapid industrialization and urbanization, including child labor. Teacher-turned-photographer Lewis Hine documented industrial child labor for the National Child Labor Committee. Disguised to evade suspicious employers, Hine captured some of the most powerful images in the history of documentary photography.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.r7KJS93D.dpuf

today’s image: Alice Lee Roosevelt


Alice Lee Roosevelt

Alice Lee Roosevelt, President Theodore Roosevelt’s irrepressible eldest daughter, married Congressman Nicholas Longworth of Ohio in an elaborate White House ceremony on February 17, 1906. Heedless of social convention, Alice’s behavior routinely shocked her family and friends. Once the president, when confronted with another of Alice’s escapades, remarked, ‘I can do one of two things, I can run the country or control Alice. I cannot do both.’ Nevertheless, the world public was captivated with the first daughter, who seemed to embody the ideal Gay Nineties woman. In spite of its promising beginning, Alice’s 25-year marriage to Longworth was not a happy one, but Alice reigned as the grande dame of Washington, D.C. society for another 50 years. This photo was taken on March 24, 1902.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.QjHzCPzg.dpuf

Good Taste Always_Pencil Sketch 3_FotoSketcher (my art collection)


Good Taste Always_Pencil Sketch 3_FotoSketcher

Good Taste Always_Pencil Sketch 3_FotoSketcher (my art collection)

Good Taste Always_Pencil Sketch 3_FotoSketcher (my art collection)

Soft Touch – Pencil sketch -1-FotoSketcher (my art Collection)


Soft Touch - Pencil sketch -1-FotoSketcher

Soft Touch – Pencil sketch -1-FotoSketcher (My Art collection)

Today’s Image: Naturalist Charles Darwin (Image: Library of Congress)


Naturalist Charles Darwin

Charles Robert Darwin, born on February 12, 1809, was the English naturalist whose theory of evolution rocked Victorian religion and science. Shortly after his graduation from Cambridge, Darwin sailed as a naturalist with the surveying ship HMS Beagle. During the five-year voyage, Darwin’s observations of wildlife led to the writing of his 1859 book The Origin of the Species, in which he proposed the theory of natural selection. All life, he said, is a struggle for existence and some species are better able to adapt to the environment and survive to pass along their characteristics. In 1871, Darwin wrote Descent of Man, which demonstrated that man and ape could have had a common ancestor. Darwin’s theories were highly controversial and unsettling to those who believed in creationism. Many Victorians condemned Darwin as blasphemous, but many important scientists of the day agreed with his theories.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.eJHAhFAX.dpuf

The age of asbestos | Mosaic


The age of asbestos | Mosaic.

today’s photo: The Airship USS Macon Crashes (Image: National Archives)


The Airship USS Macon Crashes


On its 55th flight, the airship USS Macon crashed on February 12, 1935. While off Point Sur, California, a gust of wind tore off the ship’s upper fin, which deflated the gas cells and caused the ship to fall into the sea. Most of Macon’s 83 crewmen were rescued from the waters, but two of them died in the accident. The U.S. Navy had suffered the loss of the airship Shenandoah in 1925 and Akron in 1933. Some considered airships too dangerous for the program to continue at that point, and work on them in the United States halted temporarily.

Image: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day?podMonth=2&podDay=11&pod=GO#sthash.pMfctVIU.dpuf

today’s image: George Armstrong Custer Marries Libbie Bacon




George Armstrong Custer Marries Libbie Bacon

After a courtship that began at a party on Thanksgiving Day 1862, Brevet General George Armstrong Custer and Miss Elizabeth Bacon, both of Monroe, Michigan, married on February 9, 1864. Until Custer died at the Battle of the Little Bighorn a dozen years later, Libbie followed him to postings throughout the West whenever possible. Libbie never remarried, even though she outlived her husband by 50 years, preferring to keep his memory alive by lecturing and writing books about their life together on the Plains. Elizabeth Custer lived comfortably in New York City until her death on April 8, 1933, at the age of 91.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.JnMUwxzJ.dpuf

today’s birthday: Gerhard Richter (1932)


Gerhard Richter (1932)

Richter is considered one of the foremost German artists of the post-World War II period, indeed one of the foremost artists in the world, and the prices his works fetch at auction reflect this distinction. Unwilling to settle on any one medium or approach, Richter paints, photographs, draws, and sculpts and has varied his style from austere photorealism to satirical pop to minimalism to pure abstraction. This fluidity is interpreted by some as a reaction to the early training he received where? More… Discuss

Avignon: Main Entrance of The Palais des Papes (Pencil sketch no.1 FotoSketcher) (My Art Collection)


Main_entrance_of_the_Palais_des_Papes BW pencil-sketch-1-_FotoSketcher

Avignon: Main_entrance_of_the_Palais_des_Papes BW pencil-sketch-1-_FotoSketcher (click to enlarge) (My Art Collection)

Avignon: Main entrance of the Palais des Papes (Pencil sketch no.1 FotoSketcher) (My Art Collection)

today’s Image: Jules Verne (Image ArtToday)



Jules Verne

French author Jules Verne, born on February 8, 1828, is considered the father of science fiction. Many of his 19th-century works forecast amazing scientific feats–feats that were actually carried out in the 20th century–with uncanny accuracy. Verne’s 1865 book From the Earth to the Moon told the story of a space ship that is launched from Florida to the moon and that returns to Earth by landing in the ocean. An illustration from the original version of the book is shown above. Something of a scientist and traveler himself, Verne’s 1870 work about a submarine, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, and Around the World in Eighty Days also foretold technological advances that seemed fantastic at the time. Jules Verne died in 1905.

Image ArtToday

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.lnUNkvGi.dpuf

— The Cult Cat


 

picture of the day: Samuel F.B. Morse and Telegraphy



Samuel F.B. Morse and Telegraphy
American portrait artist Samuel F.B. Morse developed the technology for electrical telegraphy in the 1830s, the first instantaneous form of communication. Using a key to hold open an electrical circuit for longer or shorter periods, an operator would tap out a message in a code composed of dots and dashes. Public demonstrations of the equipment were made in February 1838, but it was necessary for Morse to secure financial backing to build the first telegraph line to carry the signal over distance. In 1843, Congress appropriated the funds for a 37-mile line between Baltimore and Washington, D.C. After underground telegraph wires proved unsuccessful, Morse switched to pole wires and, on May 24, 1844, before a crowd of dignitaries in the chambers of the Supreme Court, Morse tapped out the message, ‘What hath God wrought?’ to an associate waiting in Baltimore.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.ovO6AIos.dpuf