Category Archives: Photography

Haiku-History Lesson, poetic thought by George-B (The Smudge and Other Poems Page)


Haiku – History Lesson, poetic thought by George-B
(The Smudge and Other Poems Page)

Mustard in a jar

Hills covered with wild mustard

All evolves with time…

Impressions from the trail: April - Spring - 2014- A Good Year

Impressions from the trail: April – Spring – 2014- A Good Year


 

pod-0520Amelia Earhart Flies Across the Atlantic Ocean On May 20, 1932.

Amelia Earhart lands near Londonderry, Ireland, to become the first woman fly solo across the Atlantic. In this June 21, 1932 photo, President Herbert Hoover is shown presenting the gold medal of the National Geographic Society to Earhart in Washington DC. , in recognition of her solo flight. Photo: Library of Congress – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.CaXwBnLB.dpuf

 

HAIKU-Rattlesnake, poetic thought by George-B (The Smudge and other poems page)


HAIKU – Rattlesnake, poetic thought by George-B

Rattlesnake crosses
trails heading for valleys’ shade
witness smudge behind.

to-rattlesnake-ridge.jpg

My first hike there! (found it on Yahoo search: isn’t that something?)

 More:

to-rattlesnake-ridge

Pope Francis Is Making Saints Out Of Two Palestinian Nuns


VATICAN CITY (RNS) Pope Francis will bestow sainthood on two Palestinian nuns on Sunday (May 17), a move that’s being seen as giving hope to the conflict-wracked Middle East and shining the spotlight on the plight of Christians in the region.

Sisters Maria Baouardy and Mary Alphonsine Danil Ghattas are due to be canonized by the pontiff along with two other 19th-century nuns, Sister Jeanne Emilie de Villeneuve, from France, and Italian Sister Maria Cristina dell’Immacolata.

The coming canonizations have been described by the Latin patriarch of Jerusalem, Fouad Twal, as a “sign of hope” for the region.

“The canonization of these two Palestinian saints is a spiritual highpoint for the inhabitants of the Holy Land,” he told Vatican Insider.

“The fact that Mariam (Maria) and Marie (Mary) Alphonsine, the first modern Palestinian saints, are both Arabs is a sign of hope for Palestine, for the entire Holy Land and the Middle East: holiness is always possible, even in a war-torn region. May a generation of saints follow them!”

Twal will travel to the Vatican for the canonizations and has invited Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to the ceremony.

Palestinians have waited more than 30 years for the sainthood of Baouardy, following her beatification by St. John Paul II in 1983.

Born into the Melchite Greek Catholic Church in 1846, in a village near Nazareth, Baouardy went on to join the Carmel of Pau in France. Despite being illiterate, she was sent to India where she founded other convents, before moving to Bethlehem where she died in 1878.

Announcing the canonization in February, the Vatican said Baouardy “experienced many sufferings together with extraordinary mystic phenomena” from an early age.

Ghattas, who was beatified by Pope Benedict XVI in 2009, lived a distinctly less international life. Born in Jerusalem in 1843, she entered the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Apparition at the age of 15. She went on to found the Congregation of Sisters of the Most Holy Rosary of Jerusalem and “worked tirelessly to help young people and Christian mothers,” the Vatican said.

The canonization of the two nuns will inevitably draw attention to Palestine and the Middle East, a region that Francis has repeatedly highlighted in recent months.

In his Easter address, the pope said: “We pray for peace for all the peoples of the Holy Land. May the culture of encounter grow between Israelis and Palestinians and the peace process be resumed, in order to end years of suffering and division.”

He additionally called for an end to “the roar of arms” in Syria and Iraq, while also pushing for a stop to “barbarous acts of violence” in Libya and peace in Yemen.

Twal had no doubt that the approaching sainthoods would have a positive impact on the entire region.

“I am sure that it will rekindle the hope of our faithful in the Middle East and encourage them to remain firm in the faith and keep their eyes fixed on heaven,” he said, “especially in these difficult times that Christians are experiencing there.”

via Pope Francis Is Making Saints Out Of Two Palestinian Nuns.

When was the last time you said ‘thank you’ and ‘I’m sorry?’ Pope asks :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


 

 

By Elise Harris

By Elise Harris

Vatican City, May 13, 2015 / 09:04 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In his general audience Pope Francis focused on the concrete challenges families face in daily life, and said that simply remembering to be grateful and to apologize can go a long way in avoiding conflict.

“Dear brothers and sisters, today’s catechesis is the opening of the door to a series of reflections on family life, real life, daily life,” the Pope told pilgrims present in St. Peter’s Square May 13.

“Above this door are written three words that we have already used other times: May I, thank you, and I’m sorry. They are words linked to good manners, (and) in their genuine sense of respect and desire for good, (they are) far away from any hypocrisy and duplicity,” he said.

Francis’ address was a continuation of his ongoing catechesis on the family, which he began at the end of last year as part of the lead-up to the World Day of Families in September, as well as October’s Synod of Bishops on the Family.

Although the words ’May I,’ ‘thank you’ and ‘I’m sorry’ can be hard to say or put into practice, their absence “can cause cracks in the foundation of the family, which can lead to its collapse,” the Pope said.

However, if families make a habit of including the phrases in their daily lives as a sign of love for one another rather than just a formal expression of good manners, they can strengthen a happy family life, he continued.

The word ‘May I’ is a reminder that we should be “delicate, respectful and patient with others,” he said. Even if we feel like we have the right to something, “when we speak to our spouse or family member with kindness we create space for a true spirit of marital and familial common life.”

Kindness helps to renew trust and respect, and reveals the love we have for others, the Pope noted, saying that we should always imitate Jesus, who stands at the door of our hearts and knocks, waiting for us to open it to him.

He then turned to the second word, noting that to say ‘thank you’ can seem like a contradiction in a distrustful society, which tends to view this attitude as weakness.

Despite this perception, it is through an “education in gratitude” that that social justice and the dignity of persons are upheld, he said.

Gratitude Francis continued, “is a virtue that for believers is born from the same heart of their faith… (it) is also the language of God, to whom above all we must express our gratitude.”

via When was the last time you said ‘thank you’ and ‘I’m sorry?’ Pope asks :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Pope Francis: Spare no effort in defending life, family :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


 

General audience with Pope Francis on March 18, 2015. Credit: Daniel Ibanez / CNA.

Vatican City, May 12, 2015 / 03:26 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In his meeting on Saturday with the bishops from Mozambique, a southeast African nation, Pope Francis urged support for public policies that promote the family and protect human life.

“Spare no efforts in supporting the family and in the defense of life from conception to natural death,” he said May 9 in the Vatican. “In this sense, remember the options appropriate to one of Christ‘s disciples and the beauty of being a mother, accompanied by the support of the family and the local community.”

“The family must always be defended as the main source of fraternity, respect for others and the primary path of peace.”

The Mozambican bishops – whose country borders Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Swaziland, South Africa, and the Indian Ocean – were in Rome for their five-yearly ad limina visit, a meeting with the Pope.

The Bishop of Rome cautioned his brother bishops against a worldly sense of success, saying, “the fecundity of our mission … is not measured by the number of collaborators, nor by the prestige of the institution, nor even by the quantity of available resources.”

“What counts is being permeated with Christ’s love, allowing oneself to be led by the Holy Spirit, and grafting one’s own existence onto the tree of life, which is the Cross of the Lord,” he said, adding that “from St. Paul, the insuperable model of the Christian missionary, we know that this means trying to conform to Jesus in his death so as to participate in his resurrection … the paschal mystery is the beating heart of the mission of the Church.”

“If you abide in this mystery, you will be protected both from a worldly and triumphalist vision of the mission, and the disappointment that may arise when faced with trials and failures.”

Pope Francis encouraged the bishops to be particularly solicitous for their priests as well as for the religious communities in their dioceses, and to live among their faithful in the “’existential peripheries’ where there is suffering, loneliness, and human degradation.”

Reflecting on the nature and role of a bishop, he said: “you are spouses of your diocesan community, profoundly tied to it.”

The Pope stated that “the pastors and the faithful of Mozambique need to further develop a culture of encounter,” saying Christ’s only request is “that you go out in search of the neediest.” He mentioned those who suffer from natural disasters, as well as displaced persons and refugees.

“These people need us to share in their suffering, their worries, their problems,” he told the bishops. “They need us to look upon them with love and you must reach out to them, as did Jesus.”

Turning to the challenges facing Mozambique, Pope Francis encouraged investment in education, so as to oppose inequality and social division. He said education “teaches the young to think critically, and offers a path towards maturity in values. In this sense, it is appropriate to raise awareness among leaders in society and to revive pastoral ministry in universities and schools, combining the task of education with the proclamation of the Gospel.”

“The needs are so great that they cannot be satisfied simply through individual initiatives or by a union of individuals educated in individualism. Community networks are needed to respond to social problems.”

He concluded by encouraging the bishops in going to the peripheries, saying, “When we go out to take the Gospel with true apostolic spirit, [Jesus] walks with us. He precedes us, and for us this is fundamental: God always goes before us.”

Tags: Pope Francis, Family, Pro-life, Abortion

via Pope Francis: Spare no effort in defending life, family :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Most read Stories: Vatican archives shed light on tragedy of Armenian genocide :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


Armenians being deported. Credit: Narek via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0).

By Andrea Gagliarducci

Vatican City, Mar 20, 2015 / 11:14 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Ahead of Pope Francis’ Mass commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide, newly released historic documents confirm the Holy See’s broad commitment to helping the Armenian people at a time when few others would.

The Italian Jesuit-run magazine La Civiltà Cattolica stressed that newly published documents “prove how the Holy See, always informed about events, had not remained passive, but was strongly committed to face the issue” of the Armenian Genocide. “Benedict XV was the only ruler or religious leader to voice out a protest against the ‘massive crime’.”

The Armenian Genocide is considered to have begun April 24, 1915 with a massacre of Armenians in Istanbul. Over the next eight years, 1.5 million Armenians would be killed and millions more displaced.

However, such killings were perpetrated before, when much of the region was still under Ottoman rule.

For instance, a March 27, 1896 letter by the Franciscan Father Domenico Werson, who was serving as a missionary in Aleppo, recounted the massacre of Christians in Marasc and vicinities.

Most of the documents in the newly published series are from the archive of the Congregation for the Eastern Churches. They have been published in a series of four books by the Jesuit priest Father Georges-Henry Ruyssen. In advance of the series’ March 21 release date, the latest edition of La Civiltà Cattolica has published a summary.

The documents on the “Armenian Question” date from the end of the 19th century to the first half of the 20th century.

The collection of documents includes letters from Popes and to Ottoman sultans; documents and dispatches by Vatican Secretaries of State and prefects or secretaries of other Vatican dicasteries; documents and reports by the Apostolic delegates; and letters by Armenian patriarchs and bishops with firsthand information.

There are also reports by eye witnesses that clearly describe what was going on.

The documents note the actions of Pope Benedict XV, who sent two personal letters to Sultan Muhammad V Reshad on Sep. 10, 1915 and March 12, 1918, respectively.

The Pope’s effort was the climax of several attempts at mediation carried forward by the Holy See to help Armenians. Pope Leo XIII tried a mediation beginning in 1859. The Holy See sought to be a mediator with Djemal Pashà, commander of the Turkish army in Syria, for the freedom of 60 Armenians sentenced to death in 1917. Cardinal Pietro Gasparri, the Vatican Secretary of State, mediated with Mustaphà Kemal Pashà in 1921 for the safeguard of the lives and the goods of surviving Christians in Turkey.

The Holy See did not only work in diplomacy, but also sought to assist surviving refugees.

The Holy See, La Civiltà Cattolica writes, “mobilized a continual flow of financial aid and supplies in an era when there were no other international humanitarian organizations beyond the Red Cross and the Near East relief.”

The Holy See especially assisted orphans, and founded “many orphanages” open to people of every religious confession. Young orphan Armenian girls were also hosted in the orphanage in the Apostolic Palace of Castel Gandolfo, near Rome.

The documents record the reasons why countries did not take any stance on the genocide and did not defend the Armenian people when the first signs of genocide were visible.

La Civiltà Cattolica underscored that in the late 19th century, the question of the future of the Armenians “was forgotten step by step,” because the “gradual passivity of European diplomacy” worked to “preserve at every cost the integrity of the Ottoman empire.”

Archbishop Augusto Bonetti, the apostolic delegate to Constantinople from 1887-1904, summarized the international situation.

France and Russia both aimed to preserve “the integrity of Turkey.” France had made major capital investments in the region, while Russia wanted Turkish relations to be dormant so it could focus on the Far East.

In Archbishop Bonetti’s view, Germany had a material interest in the continuation of the war between the Greeks and the Turks, while England had “important political interests in Turkey.”

On the eve of the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide, the publication of these documents may shed light on the reasons why this genocide was perpetrated in the midst of a general political indifference.

As for Pope Francis, he will celebrate a Mass marking the centenary of the genocide in St. Peter Basilica on April 24.

Tags: Violence, Genocide, Armenian genocide, Vatican archives

via Vatican archives shed light on tragedy of Armenian genocide :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

picture of the day: The Swedish Nightengale



The Swedish Nightengale

Swedish-born Jenny Lind (1820-1887), the greatest operatic and concert soprano of her age, was already the toast of Europe when she was approached by American showman P.T. Barnum in 1847. Even before hearing her voice, Barnum signed the ‘Swedish Nightingale‘ for 150 American concerts at the enormous sum of $150,000. With the help of Barnum’s matchless marketing, Jenny Lind mania swept America, with crowds of the rich and famous and ordinary music lovers alike falling at her feet. This 1850 daguerreotype of Miss Lind was taken by Matthew Brady.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.WIyDvPBO.dpuf

Yerba Mate in Buenos Aires


Yerba Mate-Rosamonte_My Digital Oil Paintings Series

yerba mate tea served in gourd with bombilla straw.

Gourd and bombilla straw

Koeh-074

 

 

Newtons_cradle_animation_book_2

Yerba Mate in Buenos Aires

From The Hill: Peppergrass trail 360 VIEW (Puente Hills (Whittier) Nature Preserve Authority): Let’s Go Hiking!


Peppergrass trail 360 VIEW (Puente Hills (Whittier) Nature Preserve Authority): Let’s Go Hiking!

Picture of the day: Sinking of the Lusitania


Sinking of the Lusitania

During the second year of WWI, the British Cunard ocean liner Lusitania , on a voyage from New York to Liverpool, sank off the coast of Ireland in only 18 minutes after being struck by a torpedo fired by the German U-boat U-20. Of 1,959 passengers and crew, 1,195 died. Of the fatalities, 123 were Americans. Even though the Germans maintained the liner was carrying arms purchased in America to Britain, the sinking of a passenger ship aroused intense anger against the German policy of unrestricted submarine warfare and hastened America’s entrance into the war.

Photo: U.S. Naval Historical Center

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.xSZJtze5.dpuf

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How to Prepare Gaucho Mate (powdery yerba mate)


image
How to Prepare Gaucho Mate (powdery yerba mate)

Continents In Clouds


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picture of the day: Crash of the Hindenburg


 

Crash of the Hindenburg

At 7:25 p.m. on May 6, 1937, the giant German airship Hindenburg burst into flames and crashed to the ground as it attempted to dock with a mooring mast at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in New Jersey. Carrying 36 passengers and 61 crew, Hindenburg left Frankfurt on May 4 for its first transatlantic voyage of the 1937 season. A total of 36 died when the fire ignited the 16 hydrogen-filled cells and destroyed the zeppelin in only 34 seconds. The true cause of the disaster remains a mystery, although crash investigators considered claims that Hindenburg was lost due to sabotage or an accidental charge of static electricity.

Photo: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.9RYEt6Ya.dpuf

picture of the day



On August 2, 1944, a French ArmySherman‘ tank lands on a Normandy beach from USS LST-517 during the European Campaign during World War II.

Photo: U.S. Army Signal Corps

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.37P42IyP.dpuf

picture of the day: St. Lo, France (In the summer of 1944)



St. Lo, France

In the summer of 1944, two French boys watch from a hilltop as convoys of Allied vehicles pass through the badly damaged city of St. Lo en route to the battle front. St. Lo was the scene of major fighting the latter stages of the Normandy campaign during World War II.

Photo: U.S. Army Signal Corps

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.OSqSJkFy.dpuf

Image of the day: Charles Lindbergh



Charles Lindbergh
Charles Lindbergh works on engine of ‘The Spirit of St. Louis’ in 1927.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.BRGmW7M3.dpuf

picture of the day: Happy Days Photographer Gertrude Kasebier



Happy Days

Photographer Gertrude Kasebier captures a portrait of her grandson, Charles O’Malley, surrounded by girls (holding wildflowers and a kitten) in Newport, Rhode Island in 1902.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.nmD6kn3u.dpuf

picture of the day: Scandalous Victoria Claflin Woodhull



Scandalous Victoria Claflin Woodhull

Articulate and radical in her beliefs, Victoria Claflin Woodhull (1838-1927) boldly challenged convention in Victorian-era America. Victoria and her sister, Tennessee Claflin, got their start as spiritual advisors to financier Cornelius Vanderbilt. With his backing, the sisters became the first women to open their own successful brokerage firm. Woodhull was the first woman newspaper publisher, a feminist and a militant suffragist, but most shocking to Victorian sensibilities, she also advocated free love. On April 2, 1870, Woodhull became the first woman to run for president of the United States when she announced her candidacy for the 1872 election, but she spent Election Day in jail for sending obscene literature through the mail.

Photo: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.12oGDpqL.dpuf

Bishop: Boko Haram is spreading to Cameroon – while the world looks the other way| CNA


 

Bishop: Boko Haram is spreading to Cameroon – while the world looks the other way
Children in the diocese of Maroua-Mokolo, Cameroon, which faces threats from Boko Haram. Credit: Aid to the Church in Need.

.- A bishop in Cameroon has sent out an urgent message that the militant Islamist group Boko Haram is increasingly spreading into his country – but that media around the world are paying no attention.  

In a memorandum made available to the international Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need, Bishop Bruno Ateba of the Diocese of Maroua-Mokolo lamented that the violence perpetrated in northern Cameroon by Boko Haram has not drawn significant international attention.

“What happened in Paris during the attacks there is something we experience here every day,” he said, referencing the January massacre at a Franch satirical newspaper by Muslim extremists, “and yet nobody in the world says anything about it.”

“Instead, the attention of the world is focused above all on the Middle East,” the prelate said.

Boko Haram, which means “Western education is sinful,” launched an uprising in 2009 in an effort to impose sharia law on Nigeria. More than 6,000 people have died in Boko Haram-led violence in the country, according to Human Rights Watch.

In 2014, Boko Haram became known worldwide when members kidnapped nearly 300 girls from a school in Borno State. Last month, the group pledged its allegiance to ISIS – also known as the Islamic State – which launched a bloody campaign in Iraq and Syria last summer.

But while the world turns its focus to the Middle East, Boko Haram is infiltrating parts of Cameroon, Bishop Ateba warned.

The bishop said that in his diocese alone, since the last quarter of 2014, two senior diocesan staff, three catechists and more than 30 faithful have been murdered, and there have been numerous abductions.

He also said that numerous mosques have been burnt down and imams have had their throats cut, because “they refused to obey the orders of Boko Haram.”

Since as early as December 2013, the native Muslim community within Cameroon has adopted an increasingly clear stance against Boko Haram, he explained, and Muslims have often come to the aid of Christians threatened by the terror group that is “sowing panic” in northern Cameroon.
 
Just as it does in Nigeria, Boko Haram also recruits children in Cameroon, ages 5-15, enticing them with financial benefits for their families or simply abducting them by force, the bishop reported. This year alone, he said, no fewer than 2000 Cameroonian children and adolescents have been seized by Boko Haram – including a number of girls.

The infrastructure of the affected region – already one of the poorest in Cameroon – has been severly damaged. According to Bishop Ateba, the terror attacks have caused the closure of more than 110 schools and 13 health centers, while many police stations have been destroyed.

The Diocese of Maroua-Mokolo is today home to more than 55,000 displaced Cameroonians as well as refugees from Nigeria, he added. Many have sought shelter with friends and relatives, but more than 22,000 are still hiding in the bush.

The situation is particularly bad in the community of Amchidé, where a series of attacks by Boko Haram have caused the entire population to flee, the bishop explained. As a result, the pastoral activities in the area have come to a complete standstill. The chapel has been burned down and, according to eyewitness reports, there are human skulls lying in the streets.

Praising the courage of the faithful who continue to gather for prayer despite the dangerous sitaution, Bishop Ateba also addressed world leaders with a plea: “Today we beseech your attention, your prayers and your help.”

“Help us to bring an end to this nameless brutality that is destroying all hope for the future and bringing to nothing all the hard work of generations of believers.”

 

 

 

Picture of the day


Civil War Pose Captain Cunningham — one of General T.F. Meagher’s staff — poses for a photo in Bealton, Virginia in August 1863. Photo: Library of Congress – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.4JzKBOlM.dpuf

today’s picture: The Doolittle Raid



The Doolittle Raid
At a time when their army and naval forces were advancing all over Asia and the Pacific, the Japanese got a shock when North-American B-25B Mitchells, led by Lt. Col. James H. Doolittle, bombed Tokyo on April 18, 1942. The bombers were launched from the deck of the aircraft carrier Hornet, and after striking their targets, flew on to China. Most of their crews eventually made it back to the United States.

This image was taken on the USS Hornet (CV-8) while en route to the mission’s launching point.

Photo: U.S. Naval Historical Center

Darkrooms


Darkrooms

A darkroom is a workspace for the processing of light-sensitive materials. Darkrooms have been used for black and white photography since the late 19th century, but their popularity has waned with the introduction of color, Polaroid, and digital photography. The most familiar black and white processes involve developing the image, stopping the development, fixing the image, then washing and drying it. Why is it safe to use red or amber lighting in a darkroom? More… Discuss

‘Paintings of Pains’ (palette de Frida Kahlo_Mexico_1952-1_) (FotoSketcher_ Emergence 2)


'Paintings of Pains' (palette de Frida Kahlo_Mexico_1952-1_) (FotoSketcher_ Emergence 2)

‘Paintings of Pains’ (palette de Frida Kahlo_Mexico_1952-1_) (FotoSketcher_ Emergence 2)

Palette de Frida Kahlo, Mexique, 1952 — Old Pics Archive (@oldpicsarchive)


picture of the day: President James Garfield and Daughter



President James Garfield & Daughter

President James Garfield and his daughter are captured on film.

Photo: Brady-Handy Photograph Collection, Library of Congress.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.NcmnT3vD.dpuf

picture of the day, The San Francisco Earthquake



The San Francisco Earthquake

A massive earthquake felt from Oregon to Los Angeles and as far inland as Nevada jolted San Francisco, Calif., at 5:12 a.m. on April 18, 1906. The earthquake caused severe damage and loss of life in the San Francisco Bay area, and a three-day fire spawned by the shaking reduced 4.7 square miles of the city to blackened ruins. Military officials estimated $400 million of damage and a total of 700-800 killed. Modern research estimates that closer to 3,000 of San Francisco’s 400,000 inhabitants lost their lives.

The photo captures a painter sitting amid earthquake rubble painting a picture of ruins of large building after the earthquake.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.kTuHwCsJ.dpuf

today’s picture: The Little Tramp



The Little Tramp

Producer, director, composer and silent movie comedian Charlie Chaplin was born in London on April 16, 1889, into a family of music hall performers. Visiting America with a touring company in 1913, Chaplin was cast in his first film, “Making a Living”. Although historians are not certain when the ‘little tramp’ was created, Chaplin remains most readily identified with that beloved character. This photo, showing Chaplin with child star Jackie Coogan, is from the sentimental 1921 film “The Kid”. Chaplin died in Corsier-sur-Vevey, Switzerland, on December 25, 1977.

Image: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.N2uNhh7X.dpuf

today’s picture: Assassination of Abraham Lincoln



Assassination of Abraham Lincoln
On the evening of Good Friday, April 14, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln, accompanied by his wife and a young couple, went to Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C., to see a popular play, Our American Cousin. Just after 10 p.m., actor and Southern sympathizer John Wilkes Booth burst into the presidential box and shot Lincoln behind the ear. Booth leaped to the stage, breaking his left leg on impact, and escaped through a side door. Lincoln was carried to a nearby house where he remained unconscious until his death at 7:22 the following morning. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, who had kept vigil at Lincoln’s bedside, said, ‘Now he belongs to the ages.’

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.iLrCLcXk.dpuf

De pe Facebook: Muntii Fagaras-Asa cum se vad ei din Avrig! (Vizitati Pagina de origine)


A user's photo.

Muntii Fagaras Asa cum se vad ei din Avrig

 

today’s picture: Death of Franklin Roosevelt (Funeral Procession)



Death of Franklin Roosevelt
President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (b. 1882) died of a cerebral hemorrhage at 5:48 p.m. on April 12, 1945. The 63-year-old president had been at Warm Springs, Georgia, since March 28, resting from the rigors of leading a nation at war. Roosevelt, left paralyzed by polio in 1921, was elected to the nation’s highest office four times and is judged by historians to be among the greatest American presidents. In this photograph, taken on April 24, 1945, Roosevelt’s funeral procession moves through the streets of Washington, D.C., on its way to burial at the Roosevelt family home in Hyde Park, New York.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.eTRUsBuw.dpuf

today’s picture: Jackie Robinson


Breaking Baseball’s Color Line

In August 1945, Brooklyn Dodgers’ general manager Branch Rickey first approached Jackie Robinson, an outstanding athlete then playing baseball in the Negro leagues, to participate in the “great experiment” of integrating the major leagues. After a season in the minors, Robinson officially broke baseball’s color barrier when he put on Dodgers uniform No. 42 in April 1947. In spite of intense pressure and hostility, Robinson’s athletic abilities earned him the Rookie of the Year Award in 1947. When Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers, talented black athletes toiled in relative obscurity in the Negro leagues despite the exciting caliber of their play.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.01mZYd7T.dpuf

today’s picture: Marian Anderson Sings



Marian Anderson Sings
In early 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution denied internationally famed contralto Marian Anderson the opportunity to sing at Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C., because of her race. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was so dismayed by the injustice that she resigned her own D.A.R. membership in protest. On Easter Sunday, April 9, Anderson, at the invitation of Secretary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes, sang a triumphant outdoor concert at the Lincoln Memorial before a crowd of 75,000 and a radio audience of millions.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.4Eg64H7Q.dpuf

today’s picture



WPA Approved by Congress
President Franklin Roosevelt proposed the Works Progress Administration (WPA) during the Great Depression of the 1930s when almost 25 percent of Americans were unemployed. Approved by Congress on April 8, 1935, the WPA created low-paying federal jobs to provide immediate relief. The WPA put 8.5 million jobless to work on projects as diverse as constructing highways, bridges and public buildings to arts programs like the Federal Writers’ Project. This photograph, taken in El Cerrito, San Miguel County, New Mexico, shows WPA laborers at work on a road project.

Photo: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.rCZ1yjiO.dpuf

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today’s image: Catacombs, Paris (Nadar (Gaspard-Félix Tournachon) (French, 1820–1910))


Nadar (Gaspard-Félix Tournachon). Catacombs, Paris. 1861
Nadar (Gaspard-Félix Tournachon)
(French, 1820–1910)

Catacombs, Paris

Date:
1861
Medium:
Albumen silver print from a glass negative
Dimensions:
9 7/16 x 7 13/16″ (24 x 19.8 cm)
Credit Line:
Gift of Paul F. Walter
MoMA Number:
90.1988

today’s picture: Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.



Civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., was fatally shot as he stood outside the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., on April 4, 1968. The 39-year-old minister, known for preaching nonviolence in the crusade for civil rights, was in Memphis in support of striking city sanitation workers. Escaped convict James Earl Ray was convicted of King’s murder but later recanted his confession. In spite of lingering controversy surrounding his guilt, Ray served a life sentence for the crime until his death in 1998.

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Facebook: Casa din Sona, Tara Fagarasului: Lunca Oltului Primavara cu oite si mielusei la pascut


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today’s picture: Royal Air Force Lieutenant David McIntyre



Royal Air Force Lieutenant David McIntyre and the Scottish Marquess of Clydesdale, flying two open-cockpit Westland aircraft, completed the first overflight and aerial photographic survey of Mount Everest on April 3, 1933. The British Mount Everest team, depicted here in a painting by Ron Weil, battled extreme cold and high winds as they photographed the previously unknown crest of the 29,028-foot peak. – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.vsuOShkN.dpuf

picture of the day



At 8:30 p.m. on April 2, 1917, President Woodrow Wilson, shown here delivering his message before a joint session of Congress, recommended that a state of war be declared between the United States and the imperial German government. Realizing that the war looming ahead would be a costly one, Wilson said, ‘the day has come when America is privileged to spend her blood and her might for the principles that gave her birth and happiness and the peace which she has treasured.’ – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.uiOuNhB2.dpuf

today’s image: Opening of the Eiffel Tower



Opening of the Eiffel Tower

The Eiffel Tower officially opened to the public on March 31, 1889. Constructed of 7,000 tons of iron and steel, the 984-foot structure was designed by Alexandre Gustave Eiffel for the Paris Exhibition of 1889, commemorating the centennial of the French Revolution. The price for the Eiffel Tower was more than $1 million, but fees for the year 1889 alone nearly recouped the cost. Fifty-five years later, plans by Hitler to leave the tower and much of Paris a smoking ruin were foiled by an unlikely hero, Dietrich von Choltitz.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.L1mJqReA.dpuf

today’s image



Weary soldiers from the 28th Infantry Division assemble in Bastogne on December 20, 1944, after retreating from Wiltz.. These men fought against powerful German forces until their ammunition was exhausted.

Photo: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.x784dthc.dpuf

A WAVE (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service)



A WAVE (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) Specialist (Photographer) 3rd Class salutes as she stands among the springtime cherry blossoms near the Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C., during World War II.

Photo: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.W9CeuLfV.dpuf

Moulin Rouge at Montmartre in Paris, 1923 — Classic Pics (@classicepics)


Roses are blue: Amazing sketch from my SketchGuru


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I’ve been using SketchGuru and I think you might like it. Check out from your Android phone:

https://market.android.com/details?id=com.seventeenmiles.sketch

Sent from my Android.

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Today’s beautiful rose: Amazing sketch from my SketchGuru


image

I’ve been using SketchGuru and I think you might like it. Check out from your Android phone:

https://market.android.com/details?id=com.seventeenmiles.sketch

Sent from my Android.

Posted from WordPress for Android

today’s image: USS Langley



USS Langley

On March 20, 1922, the 11,500-ton Langley was commissioned into the U.S. Navy as America’s first aircraft carrier. Langley was not regarded as a beautiful ship. Her flight deck was 533 feet long and 64 feet wide with an open-sided hanger deck, inspiring the nickname ‘the Old Covered Wagon.’ Under the leadership of Commander Kenneth Whiting, Langley served as a base for reconnaissance aircraft and a laboratory to develop new procedures for launching and recovering planes, such as the use of cross-deck arresting wires to brake incoming aircraft. This photograph shows a Douglas DT-2 airplane taking off from her flight deck.

Photo: U.S. Naval Historical Center

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.S8tJEV0v.dpuf

today’s Birthday: Ovid (43 BCE)


Ovid (43 BCE)

Publius Ovidius Naso, a Roman poet better known as Ovid, is ranked alongside Virgil, Horace, and others as one of the canonical poets of Latin literature. He was a great storyteller whose writings generally deal with the themes of love, mythology, and exile. No other Latin poet wrote so naturally in verse or with such sustained wit, and his works had a decisive influence on European art and literature for centuries. Why did Augustus banish Ovid in 8 CE? More… Discuss

today’s image: Wright 1901 Glider


Wright 1901 Glider

Above the dunes at Kitty Hawk, Orville Wright pilots the Wright 1901 glider into the same stiff winds that threaten to dislodge the hats of two spectators watching the flight from below.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.tGwimXYU.dpuf

today’s picture: Amos Two Bulls



Amos Two Bulls

Amos Two Bulls, a Sioux Indian from Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, poses for photographer Gertrude K?sebier in 1901.

Photo: Library of Congress