Tag Archives: YouTube

Watch “*FULL VERSION* TEOTFW – Walking All Day – Graham Coxon” on YouTube


Walking All Day

This song is a part of the soundtrack for Netflix’s 2018 series The End Of The F***ing World. It… read more »

WALKING ALL DAY LYRICS

[Verse 1]
Walkin’ all day with my mouth on fire, tryin’ to get talkin’ to you
Walkin’ all day with my mouth on fire, that’s what I’ve gotta do
Tryin’ to get talkin’ to you
Walkin’ all day with my feet on fire, tryin’ to get closer to you
Walkin’ all day with my feet on fire, that’s what I’ve gotta do
Tryin’ to get closer to you
Walkin’ all day with my mind on fire, I can’t stop thinking of you
Walkin’ all day with my mind on fire, that’s what I’ve gotta do
I can’t stop thinkin’ of you

[Verse 2]
Walkin’ all day with my hands on fire, wanna get to touch you
Walkin’ all day with my hands on fire, that’s what I’ve gotta do
Wanna get to touch you
Walkin’ all day with my heart on fire, falling in love with you
Walkin’ all day with my heart on fire, that’s what I’ve gotta do
Falling in love with you

[Outro]
Murder me
Make me happy
Talk to me
It’s so crappy
Ignore me
I’m being sappy, over me
What’s this power?
Gonna tell you once more

Watch “Leonard Cohen – Sound Of Silence” on YouTube



Hello darkness, my old friend
I’ve come to talk with you again
Because a vision softly creeping
Left its seeds while I was sleeping
And the vision that was planted in my brain
Still remains
Within the sound of silence
In restless dreams I walked alone
Narrow streets of cobblestone
‘Neath the halo of a street lamp
I turned my collar to the cold and damp
When my eyes were stabbed by the flash of a neon light
That split the night
And touched the sound of silence

And in the naked light I saw
Ten thousand people, maybe more
People talking without speaking
People hearing without listening
People writing songs that voices never share
And no one dare
Disturb the sound of silence
“Fools” said I, “You do not know
Silence like a cancer grows
Hear my words that I might teach you
Take my arms that I might reach you”
But my words like silent raindrops fell
And echoed
In the wells of silence
And the people bowed and prayed
To the neon god they made
And the sign flashed out its warning
In the words that it was forming
And the sign said, “The words of the prophets
Are written on the subway walls
And tenement halls”
And whisper’d in the sounds of silence
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Paul Simon
The Sound of Silence lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

The best pianist of our generation, YouTube generation: Valentina Lisitsa


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valentina_Lisitsa

Valentina Lisitsa

Valentina Lisitsa (Ukrainian: Валенти́на Євге́нівна Лиси́ця, romanized: Valentýna Jevhénivna Lysýcja, IPA: [wɐlenˈtɪnɐ jeu̯ˈɦɛn⁽ʲ⁾iu̯nɐ lɪˈsɪtsʲɐ]; Russian: Валентина Евгеньевна Лисица, romanized: Valentina Evgen’evna Lisica, IPA: [vɐlʲɪnˈtʲinə jɪvˈɡʲenʲɪvnə lʲɪˈsʲitsə]; born 25 March 1973) is a Ukrainian-American[1] pianist. She previously resided in North Carolinabefore moving to Canada, and then to France.[2][3]

Valentina Lisitsa

Background informationBorn25 March 1973(age 46)
Kiev, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet UnionGenresClassicalOccupation(s)Classical pianistInstrumentsPianoYears active1977-presentWebsitevalentinalisitsa.com
Lisitsa is among the most frequently viewed pianists on YouTube – particularly her renderings of Romantic Era virtuoso piano composers, including Franz Liszt, Frédéric Chopin and Sergei Rachmaninoff.[4][5] Lisitsa independently launched her career on social media, without initially signing with a tour promoter or record company.[4][5]

Life and career

Lisitsa was born in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1973. Her mother, also named Valentina, is a seamstress and her father, Evgeny, was an engineer.[4] Her older brother Eugene died in 2009.[6][4]
She started playing the piano at the age of three, performing her first solo recital at the age of four.[7] She is of Russian and Polish descent.[8]
Despite her early aptitude for music, her dream at that point was to become a professional chess player.[9]Lisitsa attended the Lysenko music school and, later, the Kiev Conservatory,[10] where she and her future husband, Alexei Kuznetsoff, studied under Dr. Ludmilla Tsvierko.[11]When Lisitsa met Kuznetsoff, she began to take music more seriously.[12] In 1991, they won the first prize in The Murray Dranoff Two Piano Competition in Miami, Florida.[10][13]That same year, they moved to the United States to further their careers as concert pianists.[4] In 1992 the couple married.[4] Their New York debut was at the Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center in 1995.[11]

Lisitsa posted her first YouTube video in 2007. Her set of Chopin etudes reached the number-one slot on Amazon’s list of classical video recordings, and became the most-viewed online collection of Chopin etudes on YouTube.[14][15]

To advance her career, in 2010 Lisitsa and her husband put their life savings into recording a CD of Rachmaninoff concertos with the London Symphony Orchestra.[4] In the spring of 2012, before her Royal Albert Hall debut, Lisitsa signed with Decca Records, who later released her Rachmaninoff CD set.[4] By mid-2012 she had logged nearly 50 million views of her YouTube videos.[5]
Lisitsa has performed in various venues around the world, including Carnegie Hall, David Geffen Hall, Benaroya Hall, Musikverein and the Royal Albert Hall. She is well known for her online recitals and practicing streams. She has also collaborated with violinist Hilary Hahn at various recital engagements.[10]

Controversy

Lisitsa has received criticism for her opposition to the Ukrainian government and support of pro-Russian separatists since the 2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine and the ensuing armed conflict.[16] In April 2015, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra cancelled concerts with Lisitsa, citing her “provocative” online remarks on her Twitter account; the orchestra initially did not specify which tweets or other commentary it believed crossed a line.[17][18] Later, on 8 April 2015, the CEO of Toronto Symphony, Jeff Melanson provided a PDF document of seven pages listing the most “offensive” tweets. Melanson alleged that the document would “help people understand why we made this decision, and understand as well how this is not a free speech issue, but rather an issue of someone practicing very intolerant and offensive expression through Twitter.”[19]
In response, the Toronto Star criticized the orchestra’s decision in an editorial, noting that, “Lisitsa was not invited to Toronto to discuss her provocative political views. She was scheduled to play the piano. And second, banning a musician for expressing “opinions that some believe to be offensive” shows an utter failure to grasp the concept of free speech.”[20] Lisitsa said that the orchestra threatened her if she spoke about the cancellation.[21]
According to Paul Grod, then president of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress: “Ms. Lisitsa has been engaged in a long campaign on social media belittling, insulting and disparaging the people of Ukraine as they face direct military aggression at the hands of the Russian Federation”. Grod elaborated that “Most disturbing are Ms. Lisitsa’s false allegations that the government of Ukraine is “Nazi”, and stating that the Government of Ukraine is setting up ‘filtration camps.'” The New Jersey-based Ukrainian Weekly has described her postings as “anti-Ukraine hate speech.”[8][17] In response she commented that “satire and hyperbole [are] the best literary tools to combat the lies”.[8][17]

DiscographyEdit

Lisitsa has recorded six CDs for Audiofon Records, including three solo CDs and two discs of duets with her husband Alexei Kuznetsoff; a Gold CD for CiscoMusic label with cellist DeRosa; a duet recital on VAI label with violinist Ida Haendel; and DVDs of Frédéric Chopin’s 24 Études and Schubert-Liszt Schwanengesang.[22]
Her recording of the four sonatas for violin and piano by composer Charles Ives, made with Hilary Hahn, was released in October 2011 on Deutsche Grammophon label. Her album Valentina Lisitsa Live at the Royal Albert Hall (based on her debut performance at that venue 19 June 2012) was released 2 July 2012.
Lisitsa has reproduced several compositions by various artists, including Sergei Rachmaninoff, Franz Liszt, Frédéric Chopin and Ludwig van Beethoven. Decca Records released her complete album of Rachmaninoff concertos in October 2012.[23] An album of Liszt works was released in October 2013 on Decca label in 2 formats – CD and 12″ LP which was cut unedited from analog tape. An even more recent album comprises a number of works of the composer and pianist Philip Glass.[24] As of July 2019, her latest release on Decca records is a 10CD set titled Tchaikovsky: The Complete Solo Piano Works.

ReferencesEdit

^ Everett-Green, Robert (7 December 2012). “Valentina Lisitsa: Playing the odds – by way of Rachmaninoff”. The Globe and Mail. Toronto. Retrieved 8 April 2015.

^ “Valentina Lisitsa and Alexei Kuznetsoff”. Southern Arts Federation. Retrieved 12 July2009.

^

Watch “Rachmaninov: The Isle of the Dead, Symphonic poem Op. 29 – Andrew Davis” on YouTube, painting Isle of the Dead, by Arnold Böecklin


FROM WIKIPEDIA

Isle of the De (Rchmaninoff)

A black and white reproduction of Isle of the Dead by Arnold Böcklin was the inspiration for the piece.

Isle of the Dead (Russian: Остров мёртвых), Op. 29, is a symphonic poem composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff, written in the key of A minor. He concluded the composition while staying in Dresden in 1908.[1] It is considered a classic example of Russian late-Romanticism of the beginning of the 20th century.

The piece was inspired by a black and white reproduction of Arnold Böcklin‘s painting, Isle of the Dead, which Rachmaninoff saw in Paris in 1907. Rachmaninoff was disappointed by the original painting when he later saw it, saying, “If I had seen first the original, I, probably, would have not written my Isle of the Dead. I like it in black and white.”[2]

The music begins by suggesting the sound of the oars as they meet the waters on the way to the Isle of the Dead. The slowly heaving and sinking music could also be interpreted as waves. Rachmaninoff uses a recurring figure in 5/8 time to depict what may be the rowing of the oarsman or the movement of the water, and as in several other of his works, quotes the Dies Irae plainchant, an allusion to death. In contrast to the theme of death, the 5/8 time also depicts breathing, creating a holistic reflection on how life and death are intertwined.

In 1929, Rachmaninoff conducted the Philadelphia Orchestra in a recording of the music for the Victor Talking Machine Company, which was purchased by RCA that same year and became known as RCA Victor. This recording was made in the Academy of Music in Philadelphia, using one microphone, and was later reissued on LP and CD by RCA Victor.

References

  1. ^ Wehrmeyer (2006:51)
  2. ^ Tarasti, Eero (2012). Semiotics of Classical Music: How Mozart, Brahms and Wagner Talk to Us. Berlin/Boston: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co., KG. p. 385. ISBN .

BibliographyEdit

External links

Watch “Immortal Music: Schubert Piano Quintet D667/The Trout/Jacqueline du Pré, Barenboim, Perlman, Pinchas” on YouTube


From WIKIMEDIA

Trout Quintet

The Trout Quintet (Forellenquintett) is the popular name for the Piano Quintet in A major, D. 667, by Franz Schubert. The piano quintet was composed in 1819,[1] when he was 22 years old; it was not published, however, until 1829, a year after his death.[2]

Rather than the usual piano quintet lineup of piano and string quartet, the Trout Quintet is written for piano, violin, viola, cello and double bass. The composer Johann Nepomuk Hummel had rearranged his own Septet for the same instrumentation,[3]and the Trout was actually written for a group of musicians coming together to play Hummel’s work.

Nickname

The piece is known as the Troutbecause the fourth movement is a set of variations on Schubert’s earlier LiedDie Forelle” (“The Trout”). The quintet was written for Sylvester Paumgartner, of Steyr in Upper Austria, a wealthy music patron and amateur cellist, who also suggested that Schubert include a set of variations on the Lied.[1] Sets of variations on melodies from his Lieder are found in four other works by Schubert: the Death and the Maiden Quartet, the “Trockne Blumen” Variations for Flute and Piano (D. 802), the Wanderer Fantasy, and the Fantasia for Violin and Piano in C major (D. 934, on “Sei mir gegrüßt”).

Music

The quintet consists of five movements:

The rising sextuplet figure from the song’s accompaniment is used as a unifying motif throughout the quintet, and related figures appear in four out of the five movements – all but the Scherzo. As in the song, the figure is usually introduced by the piano, ascending.[1]

I. Allegro vivace

The first movement is in sonata form. As is commonplace in works of the Classical genre, the exposition shifts from tonic to dominant; however, Schubert’s harmonic language is innovative, incorporating many mediants and submediants. This is evident from almost the beginning of the piece: after stating the tonic for ten bars, the harmony shifts abruptly into F major (the flatted submediant) in the eleventh bar.

The development section starts with a similar abrupt shift, from E major (at the end of the exposition) to C major. Harmonic movement is slow at first, but becomes quicker; towards the return of the first theme, the harmony modulates in ascending half tones.

The recapitulation begins in the subdominant, making any modulatorychanges in the transition to the second theme unnecessary, a frequent phenomenon in early sonata form movements written by Schubert.[1] It differs from the exposition only in omitting the opening bars and another short section, before the closing theme.

II. Andante

This movement is composed of two symmetrical sections, the second being a transposed version of the first, except for some differences of modulation which allow the movement to end in the same key in which it began. Tonal layout (with some intermediate keys of lower structural significance omitted) as follows:

III. Scherzo: Presto

This movement also contains mediant tonalities, such as the ending of the first section of the Scherzo proper, which is in C major, the flattened mediant, or the relative major of the parallel minor (A minor).

IV. Andantino – Allegretto

The fourth movement is a theme and variations on Schubert’s Lied Die Forelle“. As typical of some other variation movements by Schubert (in contrast to Beethoven’s style),[4] the variations do not transform the original theme into new thematic material; rather, they concentrate on melodic decoration and changes of mood. In each of the first few variations, the main theme is played by a different instrument or group. In the fifth variation, Schubert begins in the flat submediant (B major), and creates a series of modulations eventually leading back to the movement’s main key, at the beginning of the final sixth variation.

A similar process is heard in three of Schubert’s later compositions: the Octet in F major, D. 803 (fourth movement); the Piano Sonata in A minor, D. 845 (second movement); and the Impromptu in B major, D. 935 No. 3. The concluding variation is similar to the original Lied, sharing the same characteristic accompaniment in the piano.

V. Allegro giust

The Finale is in two symmetrical sections, like the second movement. However, the movement differs from the second movement in the absence of unusual chromaticism, and in the second section being an exact transposition of the first (except for some changes of octave register). A repeat sign is written for the first section: if one adheres meticulously to the score, the movement consists of three lengthy, almost identical repeats of the same musical material. Performers sometimes choose to omit the repeat of the first section when playing.

Although this movement lacks the chromaticism of the second movement, its own harmonic design is also innovative: the first section ends in D major, the subdominant. This is contradictory to the aesthetics of the Classical musical style, in which the first major harmonic event in a musical piece or movement, is the shift from tonic to dominant (or, more rarely, to mediant or submediant – but never to the subdominant).[5][6]

Musical significance

Compared to other major chamber works by Schubert, such as the last three string quartets and the string quintet, the Trout Quintet is a leisurely work, characterized by lower structural coherence, especially in its outer movements and the Andante. These movements contain unusually long repetitions of previously stated material, sometimes transposed, with little or no structural reworking, aimed at generating an overall unified dramatic design (“mechanical” in Martin Chusid’s words[1]).

The importance of the piece stems mainly from its use of an original and innovative harmonic language, rich in mediants and chromaticism, and from its timbral characteristics. The Trout Quintet has a unique sonority among chamber works for piano and strings, due mainly to the piano part, which for substantial sections of the piece concentrates on the highest register of the instrument, with both hands playing the same melodic line an octave apart (having been freed to do so by the inclusion of both cello and bass in the ensemble). Such writing also occurs in other chamber works by Schubert, such as the piano trios, but to a much lesser extent,[1][3] and is characteristic of Schubert’s works for piano four-hands,[3] one of his most personal musical genres. Such timbral writing may have influenced the works of Romantic composers such as Frédéric Chopin, who admired Schubert’s music for piano four-hands.[7]

The quintet forms the basis of Christopher Nupen‘s 1969 film The Trout, in which Itzhak Perlman, Pinchas Zukerman, Jacqueline du Pré, Daniel Barenboim and Zubin Mehtaperform it at Queen Elizabeth Hall in London.[8]

Other Uses

The song, in MIDI format, is used on modern Samsung washers and dryers to indicate that the wash or dry cycle is complete. [9]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Chusid, Martin (April 1997). “Schubert’s chamber music: before and after Beethoven”. In Christopher H. Gibbs (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Schubert. Cambridge Companions to Music. United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press. pp. 174–192. ISBN 978-0-521-48424-4.
  2. ^ Gibbs, Christopher H. (April 1997). “German reception: Schubert’s ‘journey to immortality“. In Christopher H. Gibbs (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Schubert. Cambridge Companions to Music. United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press. pp. 241–253. ISBN 978-0-521-48424-4.
  3. ^

Watch “Leonard Cohen – Famous Blue Raincoat (Live in Dublin)” on YouTube


It’s four in the morning, the end of December
I’m writing you now just to see if you’re better
New York is cold, but I like where I’m living
There’s music on Clinton Street all through the evening

I hear that you’re building your little house deep in the desert
You’re living for nothing now, I hope you’re keeping some kind of record
Yes, and Jane came by with a lock of your hair
She said that you gave it to her
That night that you planned to go clear
Did you ever go clear?
Ah, the last time we saw you you looked so much older
Your famous blue raincoat was torn at the shoulder
You’d been to the station to meet every train, and
You came home without Lili Marlene
And you treated my woman to a flake of your life
And when she came back she was nobody’s wife
Well I see you there with the rose in your teeth
One more thin gypsy thief
Well, I see Jane’s awake
She sends her regards
And what can I tell you my brother, my killer
What can I possibly say?
I guess that I miss you, I guess I forgive you
I’m glad you stood in my way
If you ever come by here, for Jane or for me
Well, your enemy is sleeping, and his woman is free
Yes, and thanks, for the trouble you took from her eyes
I thought it was there for good so I never tried
And Jane came by with a lock of your hair
She said that you gave it to her
That night that you planned to go clear
Sincerely, L Cohen
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Leonard Cohen
Famous Blue Raincoat lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Watch “Miles Davis – Smoke gets in your eyes” on YouTube


Watch “The Blacklist ( Best of Raymond Reddington ) part 2” on YouTube


Watch “The Blacklist ( Best of Raymond Reddington ) part 1” on YouTube


Watch “Lady Diana – Candle in the wind (Goodbye Englands rose) – Elton John – Lyrics in text” on YouTube


Goodbye Norma Jean
Though I never knew you at all
You had the grace to hold yourself
While those around you crawled
They crawled out of the woodwork
And they whispered into your brain
They set you on the treadmill
And they made you change your name

And it seems to me you lived your life
Like a candle in the wind
Never knowing who to cling to
When the rain set in
And I would have liked to have known you
But I was just a kid
Your candle burned out long before
Your legend ever did
Loneliness was tough
The toughest role you ever played
Hollywood created a superstar
And pain was the price you paid
Even when you died
Oh the press still hounded you
All the papers had to say
Was that Marilyn was found in the nude
And it seems to me you lived your life
Like a candle in the wind
Never knowing who to cling to
When the rain set in
And I would have liked to have known you
But I was just a kid
Your candle burned out long before
Your legend ever did
Goodbye Norma Jean
Though I never knew you at all
You had the grace to hold yourself
While those around you crawled
Goodbye Norma Jean
From the young man in the twenty second row
Who sees you as something more than sexual
More than just our Marilyn Monroe
And it seems to me you lived your life
Like a candle in the wind
Never knowing who to cling to
When the rain set in
And I would have liked to have known you
But I was just a kid
Your candle burned out long before
Your legend ever did
Your candle burned out long before
Your legend ever did
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Elton John / Bernie Taupin
Candle in the Wind lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, BMG Rights Management

Watch “Susan Boyle Wins GOLDEN BUZZER on AGT The Champions | Got Talent Global” on YouTube


Watch “Chicago The Musical – “All That Jazz”” on YouTube


Watch “Rachmaninov/Respighi: 5 Études-tableaux (P. 160) (1930)” on YouTube


Études-Tableaux, Op. 33

The Études-Tableaux (“study pictures”), Op. 33, is the first of two sets of piano études composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff.
They were intended to be “picture pieces”, essentially “musical
evocations of external visual stimuli”. But Rachmaninoff did not
disclose what inspired each one, stating: “I do not believe in the
artist that discloses too much of his images. Let [the listener] paint
for themselves what it most suggests.”[1] However, he willingly shared sources for a few of these études with the Italian composer Ottorino Respighi when Respighi orchestrated them in 1930.

HistoryEdit

Rachmaninoff composed the Op. 33 Études-Tableaux at his Ivanovka estate in Tambov, Russia between August and September 1911, the year after completing his second set of preludes, Op. 32. While the Op. 33 Études-Tableaux
share some stylistic points with the preludes, they are actually not
very similar. Rachmaninoff concentrates on establishing well-defined
moods and developing musical themes in the preludes. There is also an
academic facet to the preludes, as he wrote 24 of them, one in each of
the 24 major and minor keys.

Rachmaninoff biographer Max Harrison calls the Études-Tableaux
“studies in [musical] composition”; while they explore a variety of
themes, they “investigate the transformation of rather specific climates
of feeling via piano textures and sonorities. They are thus less
predictable than the preludes and compositionally mark an advance” in
technique.[2]

Rachmaninoff
initially wrote nine pieces for Op. 33 but published only six in 1914.
One étude, in A minor, was subsequently revised and used in the Op. 39 set;
the other two appeared posthumously and are now usually played with the
other six. Performing these eight études together could be considered
to run against the composer’s intent, as the six originally published
are unified through “melodic-cellular connections” in much the same way
as in Robert Schumann‘s Symphonic Studies.[3]

Differing
from the simplicity of the first four études, Nos. 5–8 are more
virtuosic in their approach to keyboard writing, calling for
unconventional hand positions, wide leaps for the fingers and
considerable technical strength from the performer. Also, “the
individual mood and passionate character of each piece” pose musical
problems that preclude performance by those lacking strong physical
technique.[3]

Numbering and characterEdit

Rachmaninoff wrote nine études-tableaux at his Ivanovka estate in 1911. Six of them, the original Nos. 1–2 and 6–9, were published that year.[4] The original No. 4 is lost; the piece was revised and published as Op. 39, No. 6.[4] The original Nos. 3 and 5 were published posthumously within Op. 33.[4] Probably best identified by their tempo markings and keys, the 1911 pieces are numbered by the International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP) as follows,[5] leaving aside the piece that is now part of Op. 39:

  • Allegro non troppo in F minor — No. 1

This study has a martial character. Rachmaninov adored the music of Frédéric Chopin, and there are often parallels between the music of the two composers. This study recalls the Étude Op. 25, No. 4 of Chopin.

  • Allegro in C major — No. 2

This study is characterized by a marked lyricism and a very expressive melody. Notice the similarity to Rachmaninoff’s Prelude op. 32 no. 12, which was composed the year before, in 1910.

  • Grave in C minor — No. 3 (published posthumously)

This study was re-used in the Largo of Rachmaninov’s Fourth Concerto, which was completed in 1926.

  • Moderato in D minor — No. 4 (published posthumously, originally No. 5)

This study is similar to the Prelude op. 23 No. 3 composed by Rachmaninoff in 1903, both in tone and character.

  • Non allegro—Presto in E-flat minor — No. 5 (published as No. 3, originally No. 6)

This
study ranks among the most difficult of the opus, to play. The right
hand runs constantly throughout the whole keyboard with numerous octave
leaps and chromatic scales. Note some similarity to the Prelude op. 28 No. 16 and the Op. Study 25 No. 6 by Chopin. In Russia, this piece is nicknamed The Snow Storm.

  • Allegro con fuoco in E-flat major — No. 6 (published as No. 4, originally No. 7)

This study has primarily a military aspect. The study concludes with a particularly virtuosic coda.

  • Moderato in G minor — No. 7 (published as No. 5, originally No. 8)

This study parallels the finale of the First Ballade in G minor by Chopin.

  • Grave in C-sharp minor — No. 8 (published as No. 6, originally No. 9)

This study was one of the three in this opus that were famously recorded in the Melodiya studios by Sviatoslav Richter, the other two being Moderato in D minor and Non allegro—Presto in E-flat minor.[6]

Arrangements

Recordings

References

External links

Watch “Bob Seger- Night Moves” on YouTube


  1. 2 of 5

    I was a little too tall
    Could’ve used a few pounds
    Tight pants points hardly reknown
    She was a black haired beauty with big dark eyes
    And points all her own sitting way up high
    Way up firm and high
    Out past the cornfields where the woods got heavy
    Out in the back seat of my ’60 Chevy
    Workin’ on mysteries without any clues
    Workin’ on our night moves
    Trying’ to make some front page drive-in news
    Workin’ on our night moves in the summertime
    In the sweet summertime
    We weren’t in love oh no far from it
    We weren’t searching for some pie in the sky summit
    We were just young and restless and bored
    Living by the sword
    And we’d steal away every chance we could
    To the backroom, the alley, the trusty woods
    I used her she used me
    But neither one cared
    We were getting our share
    Workin’ on our night moves
    Trying to lose the awkward teenage blues
    Workin’ on out night moves
    In the summertime
    And oh the wonder
    Felt the lightning
    And we waited on the thunder
    Waited on the thunder
    I woke last night to the sound of thunder
    How far off I sat and wondered
    Started humming a song from 1962
    Ain’t it funny how the night moves
    When you just don’t seem to have as much to lose
    Strange how the night moves
    With autumn closing in
    Source: Musixmatch


    Songwriters: SEGER ROBERT CLARK
    Night Moves lyrics © Gear Publishing, Gear Publishing Company Inc, GEAR PUBLISHING CO., INC., HIDEOUT RECORDS/DISTRIBTRS INC (GEAR PUBLISHING DI, HIDEOUT RECORDS DIST. INC.

Watch “Gordon Lightfoot – Sundown {HD}” on YouTube


Gordon Lightfoot,

Sundown

I can see her lyin’ back in her satin dress
In a room where ya do what ya don’t confess
Sundown you better take care
If I find you beenn creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sundown ya better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs
She’s been lookin’ like a queen in a sailor’s dream
And she don’t always say what she really means
Sometimes I think it’s a shame
When I get feelin’ better when I’m feelin’ no pain
Sometimes I think it’s a shame
When I get feelin’ better when I’m feelin’ no pain
I can picture every move that a man could make
Getting lost in her lovin’ is your first mistake
Sundown you better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sometimes I think it’s a sin
When I feel like I’m winnin’ when I’m losin’ again
I can see her lookin’ fast in her faded jeans
She’s a hard lovin’ woman, got me feelin’ mean
Sometimes I think it’s a shame
When I get feelin’ better when I’m feelin’ no pain
Sundown you better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sundown you better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sometimes I think it’s a sin
When I feel like I’m winnin’ when I’m losin’ again

Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Gordon Lightfoot
Sundown lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc

Do you believe in…chocolate??? Watch “Hot Chocolate (I Believe in Miracles)” on YouTube



I believe in miracles
Where you from
You sexy thing, sexy thing you
I believe in miracles
Since you came along
You sexy thing

Where did you come from, baby?
How did you know I needed you?
How did you know I needed you so badly?
How did you know I’d give my heart gladly?
Yesterday I was one of the lonely people
Now you’re lying close to me, making love to me
I believe in miracles
Where you from, you sexy thing? (Sexy thing, you)
I believe in miracles
Since you came along, you sexy thing
Where did you come from, angel?
How did you know I’d be the one?
Did you know you’re everything I prayed for?
Did you know, every night and day for?
Every day, needing love and satisfaction
Now you’re lying next to me, giving it to me
I believe in miracles
Where you from, you sexy thing? (Sexy thing, you)
I believe in miracles
Since you came along, you sexy thing
Oh! Kiss me, you sexy thing
Touch me baby, you sexy thing
I love the way you touch me, darling, you sexy thing
Oh! It’s ecstasy, you sexy thing
Yesterday I was one of the lonely people
Now you’re lying close to me, giving it to me
I believe in miracles
Where you from, you sexy thing? (Sexy thing, you)
I believe in miracles
Since you came along, you sexy thing
Oh, touch me
Kiss me, darling
I love the way you hold me, baby
Oh, it’s ecstasy
Oh! It’s ecstasy (Sexy thing, you sexy thing, you)
Kiss me, baby (Sexy thing, you sexy thing, you)
I love the way you kiss me, darling (Sexy thing, you sexy thing, you)
Oh, yeah (Sexy thing, you sexy thing, you)
Love the way you hold me (Sexy thing, you sexy thing, you)
Keep on lovin’ me, darling (Sexy thing, you sexy thing, you)
Keep on lovin’ me, baby (Sexy thing, you sexy thing, you)
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Brown Wilson
You Sexy Thing lyrics © Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd., Music & Media Int’l, Inc

Something is wrong with WordPress!


Something is wrong with WordPress!

No Sir it is not not okay!

There is a glich: when you try to publish a new post… The YouTube linked video disappears and the post is published void of content, only with its generic title.

It is important to view every post by checking out the content of your posts, as one cannot expect everything to be taken care of by some force in the universe, virtual or real…

Solution: copy the link to your video on the clipboard before pressing the linking of the video you are uploading to WordPress. When you check your post see that your video exists…and if it doesn’t: paste the copied link in the content of your post, then view the post to make sure that the video is there and functional.

Note: If in the process the applicaton fails report it, don’t just OK it…because it really isn’t okay for these things to happen! No sir it is not!

Thank you for your attention!

No Sir it is not not okay!

No Sir, it is not okay!

And bring back “CAPTION” to images and allow larger size pics to be installed: Allow full width pics….PLEASE!

By, Euzicasa (GeorgeB)

Watch Valentina Lisitsa: F. Schubert Sonata A major # 20 D.959 Valentina Lisitsa Another exceptional interpretation, from the unequaled Valentina Lisitsa


F. Schubert Sonata A major # 20 D.959 Valentina Lisitsa

Published on Jul 25, 2016

Does it seem to you that the world has gone mad? Wars, bombings, killings, hate….
I can offer but a little remedy, an escape rather. Music equivalent of “slow TV”, something created not to excite our over-driven nerves, but to soothe, to lull, to put in ultimate trance, to make the time stand still and the troubles of outside world fade away, if only for a few minutes.
Nobody has done it better than my beloved Franz Schubert.
There is a famous quip about two musicians arguing over the merits ( or weaknesses) of Schubert late piano sonatas, one describing the unusual time span of the pieces as “the heavenly lengths”, another – replying “they aren’t that heavenly, they are just plain LENGTHS”.
Yes, Schubert is unique in a sense that he’s dispensed not only with customary time restrains established by the need to keep the listener “interested”, but also with the medley of rather theatrical “action heroes” prerequisite for a virtuoso performer to feel adequate 🙂 His music is not about heroes and villains, gods and devils.
His music is about you and I, about regular people living their lives, loving, longing, suffering, dying….all without the world taking notice and without the headlines.That’s the real charm and beguiling spell of his music – this is about us, the regular human beings, whom he understood better than any other composer.
You might not be able to fully enjoy this piece from the first try, or if you have your thoughts wondering around, thinking of million little things, looking for easy gratification of virtuoso finger-work and thunderous chords.
You will enjoy it if you allow yourself to surrender to this music, to its flow, as slow, smooth and spellbinding neurasthenia waters of mythical river Lethe, the river of forgetfulness and oblivion.

“J’ai trop vu,
trop senti,
trop aimé dans ma vie;
Je viens chercher vivant le calme du Léthé.”

“I have seen too much,
felt too much,
loved too much in my life;

I come to seek, still living,
the calm of Lethe.”

A.de Lamartine

00:00 1. Allegro
17:17 2. Andantino
26:14 3. Scherzo: Allegro vivace – Trio: Un poco più lento
31:20 4. Rondo: Allegretto – Presto.

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Fabulous rendition: Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa


Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa

great compositions/performances: Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3, in C minor, Op. 37, Daniel Barenboim / Dresden Staatskapelle 2007


Beethoven : Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 Daniel Barenboim / Dresden Staatskapelle 2007

great compositions/performances: Mozart – Horn Concerto No. 2 in E flat, K. 417 [complete]


Mozart – Horn Concerto No. 2 in E flat, K. 417 [complete]

 

historic Musical Bits: Wilhelm Kempff plays Chopin Impromptu No. 3 in G flat Op. 51 (rec.1958)


Wilhelm Kempff plays Chopin Impromptu No. 3 in G flat Op. 51 (rec.1958)

historic musical bits: Koeckert-Quartett · Antonín Dvořák · String Quartet F major op. 96 “American” (rec ~1953)


Koeckert-Quartett · Antonín Dvořák · String Quartet F major op. 96 “American”

great compositions/performances: Beethoven String Quartet No 4 Op 18 in C minor Alban Berg Quartet


Beethoven String Quartet No 4 Op 18 in C minor Alban Berg Quartet

Fabulous Renditions: Beethoven “Für Elise” Valentina Lisitsa Seoul Philharmonic


Beethoven “Für Elise” Valentina Lisitsa Seoul Philharmonic

Fabulous renditions: Valentina Lisitsa – Paganini-Liszt La Campanella (two Separate musical events)


Paganini-Liszt La Campanella 


Uploaded on Dec 7, 2008

Live from Seoul. Encore #1. Liszt “La Campanella”
Buy La Campanella video http://www.amazon.co.uk/Live-Royal-Al…
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La campanella

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
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0:00
Performed by Romuald Greiss on an 1850 Budynowicz piano

Problems playing this file? See media help.

“La campanella” (Italian for “The little bell”) is the nickname given to the third of Franz Liszt‘s six Grandes études de Paganini (“Grand Paganini Études”), S. 141 (1851). It is in the key of G-sharp minor. This piece is a revision of an earlier version from 1838, the Études d’exécution transcendente d’après Paganini, S. 140. Its melody comes from the final movement of Niccolò Paganini‘s Violin Concerto No. 2 in B minor, where the tune was reinforced by a little handbell.[1][2][3]

The étude is played at a brisk allegretto tempo and studies right hand jumping between intervals larger than one octave, sometimes even stretching for two whole octaves within the time of a sixteenth note. As a whole, the étude can be practiced to increase dexterity and accuracy at large jumps on the piano, along with agility of the weaker fingers of the hand. The largest intervals reached by the right hand are fifteenths (two octaves) and sixteenths (two octaves and a second). Sixteenth notes are played between the two notes, and the same note is played two octaves or two octaves and a second higher with no rest. Little time is provided for the pianist to move the hand, thus forcing the pianist to avoid tension within the muscles. Fifteenth intervals are quite common in the beginning of the étude, while the sixteenth intervals appear twice, at the thirtieth and thirty-second measures.

 
The two red notes are 35 half-steps apart, which is about 46cm apart on a piano.

However, the left hand studies about four extremely large intervals, larger than those in the right hand. For example, in bar 101, the left hand makes a sixteenth-note jump of just a half-step below three octaves. The étude also involves other technical difficulties, e.g. trills with the fourth and fifth fingers.

The work has been arranged by other composers and pianists, most notably Ferruccio Busoni and Marc-André Hamelin.
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Published on Jan 27, 2014

Valentina Lisitsa performed Liszt La Campanella from Paganini Etude No 3 at Concert hall, Seoul Art Center, 25th November, 2013 under Masters Series which Composer Jeajoon Ryu present.(Encore after 3 hours recital.)

Valentina Lisitsa – Liszt La Campanella – from Paganini Etude No. 3

 

fabulous Renditions: Valentina Lisitsa – Edvard Grieg – The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16(two videos)


 Edvard Grieg – The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16(two videos)- Valentina Lisitsa

historic music bits: BEETHOVEN Piano Trio No.7 ‘Archduke’ | E.Gilels, L.Kogan, M.Rostropovich | 1956


BEETHOVEN Piano Trio No.7 ‘Archduke’ | E.Gilels, L.Kogan, M.Rostropovich | 1956

great compositions/performances: Franz Schubert: String Quartet No. 13 in A minor (the Rosamunde Quartet), D. 804, Op. 29


Franz Schubert: String Quartet No. 13 in A minor (the Rosamunde Quartet), D. 804, Op. 29

fabulous musical renditions: Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa


Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa

FABULOUS MUSICAL RENDITIONS: Exploding Beethoven: Tempest Sonata Live from Paris Valentina Lisitsa


Exploding Beethoven: Tempest Sonata Live from Paris Valentina Lisitsa

Best musical Interpretations: Beethoven Sonata Op 57 “Appassionata” Mov1, ,3, Valentina Lisitsa, piano


Beethoven Sonata Op 57 “Appassionata” Mov1

Best musical collections: Mozart – Symphonies No. 25, 29, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 41 Wiener Philharmoniker Leonard Bernstein


Mozart – Symphonies No. 25, 29, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 41 (Bernstein)

historic musical bits: Claudio Arrau Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 30


Claudio Arrau Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 30

historic musical bits: MOZART Symphony No 40 in G minor, KV550, LEONARD BERNSTEIN|Boston Symphony Orchestra


MOZART Symphony No 40 in G minor KV550 LEONARD BERNSTEIN

historic musical bits: Franz Schubert Symphony No.8 “Unfinished” D 759, Leonard Bernstein


Franz Schubert Symphony No.8 “Unfinished” D 759, Leonard Bernstein

great compositions/performances: Beethoven Piano Sonata 10 G major Barenboim


Beethoven Piano Sonata 10 G major Barenboim

 

Historic Musical Bits: Mozart: Piano concerto n. No. 21 in C major, K.467(“Elvira Madigan”) Pollini-Muti


Mozart: Piano concerto n. No. 21 in C major, K.467 (“Elvira Madigan”) Pollini-Muti