Tag Archives: YouTube

Amazing music/golden performances: Schumann Symphonic Etudes Op. 13 & Op.Posth. Valentina Lisitsa


Schumann Symphonic Etudes Op. 13 & Op.Posth. Valentina Lisitsa

Historic Musical Bits: Michelangeli Debussy Preludes Book 1


Michelangeli Debussy Preludes
Book 1

 

Haydn String Quartet Op. 76 No. 5 Jasper String Quartet ( Amazing Romantic Theme: II. Largo. Cantabile e mesto (F-sharp major)


Haydn String Quartet Op. 76 No. 5

Published on Sep 13, 2014

Performed by the Jasper String Quartet
(http://www.jasperquartet.com)
at Soka Performing Arts Center
November 24, 2013

String Quartet Op. 76 No. 5 Joseph Haydn
I. Allegretto
II. Largo. Cantabile e mesto
III. Menuetto. Allegro
IV. Finale. Presto
*************************************************

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The six String Quartets, Op. 76 by Joseph Haydn were composed in 1796 or 1797 and dedicated to the Hungariancount Joseph Georg von Erdödy[n 1] (1754–1824). They form the last complete set of string quartets that Haydn composed. At the time of the commission, Haydn was employed at the court of Prince Nicolaus Esterházy II and was composing the oratorioThe Creation as well as Princess Maria Hermenegild Esterházy’s annual mass.

Although accounts left by visitors to the Esterházy estate indicate that the quartets were completed by 1797, an exclusivity agreement meant that they were not published until 1799.[1] Correspondence between Haydn and his Viennese publishers Artaria reveal confusion as regards their release: Haydn had promised Messrs. Longman Clementi & Co. in London the first publishing rights, but a lack of communication led him to worry that their publication in Vienna might also be, unintentionally, their first appearance in full. In the event, their publication in London and Vienna was almost simultaneous.[1]

The Op. 76 quartets are among Haydn’s most ambitious chamber works, deviating more than their predecessors from standard sonata form and each emphasizing their thematic continuity through the seamless and near-continual exchange of motifs between instruments.[2]

Opus 76, No. 5 (“Largo”)

The Quartet No. 64 in D major, Op. 76, No. 5, is sometimes nicknamed Largo because the second movement with that tempo distinction dominates the quartet both in length and in character.[citation needed] The work consists of four movements:

The first movement (in D Major, 6/8 time) departs from the sonata form of the first four to what Robin Golding can only describe as “unorthodox variations”.[citation needed] The second movement, written in F-sharp major in cut time, is in sonata form. The third movement, in D major and D minor, is a standard minuet and trio, while the fourth movement’s D Major, cut time Presto is in an irregular sonata form.[6]

 

Beethoven – Piano Sonata No. 24 in F Sharp major, Op. 78 -À Thérèse- – Artur Schnabel (this sonata plays for me for more than 50 years)


Beethoven – Piano Sonata No. 24 in F Sharp major, Op. 78 -À Thérèse- – Artur Schnabel

discover beautiful music with Andras Schiff: Piano sonata op. 24, no. 78 “Fur Therese” (“Beethoven most beautiful melody”)


Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 24 in F-sharp major, Op. 78

Amazing Music /performances: Dvorak : In Nature’s Realm Overture op 91


Dvorak : In nature’s realm ouverture op 91

Historic Musical Bits: LISZT Polonaise No.2 (S.223/2) | F.R.Duchable | 1974


LISZT Polonaise No.2 (S.223/2) | F.R.Duchable | 1974

Amazing music/performances: Beethoven String Quartet No 2 Op 18 in G major Alban Berg Quartet


Beethoven String Quartet No 2 Op 18 in G major Alban Berg Quartet

Arturo Zeballos plays SUITE ESPAÑOLA de Gaspar Sanz


Arturo Zeballos plays SUITE ESPAÑOLA de Gaspar Sanz

Alexander Scriabin Piano Concerto f-sharp minor opus 20 – II. Andante


Alexander Scriabin Piano Concerto f-sharp minor opus 20 – II. Andante

Amazing Music/Performances: Schubert Piano Sonata No 9 in B, D575 Andras Schiff


Schubert Piano Sonata No 9 in B, D575 Andras Schiff

Historic Musical Bits: David Oistrakh – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 3 in G major, K 216


David Oistrakh – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 3 in G major, K 216

Listen, listen, listen: Your moment has come, Mr Tsipras, take back control of your country – UKIP leader Nigel Farage


Your moment has come, Mr Tsipras, take back control of your country – UKIP leader Nigel Farage

great compositions/performances: ,Claude Debussy – Nocturnes


Claude Debussy – Nocturnes

great compositions/performances: Glazunov “Symphony No 7” USSR Ministry of Culture Symphony OrchestraGennadi Rozhdestvensky


Glazunov “Symphony No 7” Gennadi Rozhdestvensky

Great compositions/performances: ALEXANDER BORODIN – String Quartet No 2 in D major


ALEXANDER BORODIN – String Quartet No 2 in D major

Great compositions/performances: Antonin Dvorak , String Quintet No. 3, In E Flat Major, Op 97, by Dvorak Quartet, with Josef Kodousesk, viola


Henry David Thoreau — ‘A lake is a landscape’s most beautiful and expressive feature. … ― Henry David Thoreau, Walden.

Antonin Dvorak,String Quintet No.3, In E Flat Major, Op 97(It is a Viola Quitet)

Antonin Dvorak, : The Wood Dove, Op. 110, B. 198 , great compositions/performances, (Fritz Lehmann · Symphony Orchestra of Radio Berlin)


The Wood Dove, Op. 110, B. 198

great compositions/performances: Schubert – String Quartet No. 13 in A minor, D. 804 (Pražák Quartet )


Schubert – String Quartet No. 13 in A minor, D. 804

great compositions/performances: Richard Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (BBC Proms 2012)


Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (Proms 2012)

greaat compositions/performances: Pepe Romero: Concierto de Aranjuez ( Joaquin Rodrigo), Recuerdos de la Alhambra ( Francisco Tarrega)


Pepe Romero: Concierto de Aranjuez ( Joaquin Rodrigo), Recuerdos de la Alhambra ( Francisco Tarrega)

make music part of your life series: Franz Anton Rösler (Rosetti). Symphony in D major, A12


Franz Anton Rösler (Rosetti). Symphony in D major, A12

historic musical bits: Hamilton Harty – Carl Maria von Weber: Abu Hassan Overture


Hamilton Harty – Carl Maria von Weber: Abu Hassan Overture

make music part of your life series: Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 (“Spring”)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BS_rG_XZ0Y%5B/emebed%5D

Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 [complete] (Spring)

Mgr Yousif Mirkis, archevêque de Kirkouk en Irak : « Toute ma vie je n’ai connu que des troubles »


Mgr Yousif Mirkis, archevêque de Kirkouk en Irak : « Toute ma vie je n’ai connu que des troubles »

historic musical bits: Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20


Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20

great compositions/performances: ,Hilary Hahn – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 4 in D major, K 218


Hilary Hahn – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 4 in D major, K 218

Just a thought: “Nobody knows best what’s in the soul of a artist but the artist himself:…”


George Bost

commented on a video on YouTube.

Shared publicly  –  Jan 14, 2015

 

Just a thought: “Nobody knows best what’s in the soul of a artist but the artist himself:  The audience is captive to the guessing,,even when everything is all exposed, there and then. I am impressed! I too am all I can be: captive (rather captivated!) audience!”

-George-B

Mendelssohn: Four Pieces for String Quartet, Op.81 – 2. Scherzo


 

Published on Nov 8, 2014

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America

Mendelssohn: Four Pieces for String Quartet, Op.81 – 2. Scherzo · Emerson String Quartet

℗ 2005 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Composer: Mendelssohn

Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Music

    • “Mendelssohn: Four Pieces for String Quartet, Op.81 – 2. Scherzo” by Emerson String Quartet (Google PlayiTunesAmazonMP3)
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great compositions/performances: Maurice Ravel – Sonatine pour piano: Gabriele Tomasello, piano.


Maurice Ravel – Sonatine pour piano

Music for the soul: J. S. Bach: Cantata Nº 208, ‘Sheep May Safely Graze’, BWV 208


J. S. Bach: Cantata Nº 208, ‘Sheep May Safely Graze’, BWV 208

make music part of your life: Aram Khachaturian – Lezginka from Gayane


Aram Khachaturian – Lezginka from Gayane

**********************************************************************

 

 
Khachaturian in 1971

signature written in ink in a flowing script

Aram Il’yich Khachaturian (/ˈærəm ˌkɑːəˈtʊəriən/;[1] Russian: Арам Ильич Хачатурян; Armenian: Արամ Խաչատրյան, Aram Xačatryan;[A] Armenian pronunciation: [ɑˈɾɑm χɑt͡ʃʰɑt(ə)ɾˈjɑn]; 6 June 1903 – 1 May 1978) was a Soviet Armenian composer and conductor. He is considered one of the leading Soviet composers.[2][3]

Born and raised in Tbilisi, the multicultural capital of Georgia, Khachaturian moved to Moscow in 1921 following the Sovietization of the Caucasus. Without prior music training, he enrolled in the Gnessin Musical Institute, subsequently studying at the Moscow Conservatory in the class of Nikolai Myaskovsky, among others. His first major work, the Piano Concerto (1936), popularized his name within and outside the Soviet Union. It was followed by the Violin Concerto (1940) and the Cello Concerto (1946). His other significant compositions include the Masquerade Suite (1941), the Anthem of the Armenian SSR (1944), three symphonies (1935, 1943, 1947), and around 25 film scores. Khachaturian is best known for his ballet music—Gayane (1942) and Spartacus (1954). His most popular piece, the “Sabre Dance” from Gayane, has been used extensively in popular culture and has been covered by a number of musicians worldwide.[4] His style is “characterized by colorful harmonies, captivating rhythms, virtuosity, improvisations, and sensuous melodies.”[5]

During most of his career, Khachaturian was approved by the Soviet government and held several high posts in the Union of Soviet Composers from the late 1930s, although he joined the Communist Party only in 1943. Along with Sergei Prokofiev and Dmitri Shostakovich, he was officially denounced as a “formalist” and his music dubbed “anti-people” in 1948, but was restored later that year. After 1950 he taught at the Gnessin Institute and the Moscow Conservatory, and turned to conducting. He traveled to Europe, Latin America and the United States with concerts of his own works. In 1957 Khachaturian became the Secretary of Union of Soviet Composers, a position he held until his death.

Khachaturian was the most renowned Armenian composer of the 20th century[6] and the author of the first Armenian ballet music, symphony, concerto, and film score.[B] While following the established musical traditions of Russia, he broadly used Armenian and to lesser extent, Caucasian, Eastern & Central European, and Middle Eastern peoples’ folk music in his works. He is highly regarded in Armenia, where he is considered a “national treasure”.[7]

Denunciation and restoration (1948)

 
Khachaturian in 1964

In mid-December 1947, the Department for Agitation and Propaganda (better known as Agitprop) submitted to Andrei Zhdanov, the secretary of the Communist Party’s Central Committee, a document on the “shortcomings” in the development of Soviet music. On 10–13 January 1948, a conference was held at the Kremlin in the presence of seventy musicians, composers, conductors and others who were confronted by Zhdanov:[35]

We will consider that if these comrades [Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Myaskovsky, Khachaturian, Kabalevsky and Shebalin] namely who are the principal and leading figures of the formalist direction in music. And that direction is fundamentally incorrect.

Thus, Khachaturian and other leading composers were denounced by the Communist Party as followers of the alleged formalism[10] (i.e. “[a type of] music that was considered too advanced or difficult for the masses to enjoy”)[3] and their music was dubbed “anti-people”.[36] It was the Symphonic Poem (1947), later titled the Third Symphony, that officially earned Khachaturian the wrath of the Party.[35][37] Ironically, he wrote the work as a tribute to the 30th anniversary of the October Revolution.[38] He stated: “I wanted to write the kind of composition in which the public would feel my unwritten program without an announcement. I wanted this work to express the Soviet people’s joy and pride in their great and mighty country.”[39]

Musicologist Blair Johnston believes that his “music contained few, if any, of the objectionable traits found in the music of some of his more adventuresome colleagues. In retrospect, it was most likely Khachaturian’s administrative role in the Union [of Soviet Composers], perceived by the government as a bastion of politically incorrect music, and not his music as such, which earned him a place on the black list of 1948.”[40] In March 1948,[20] Khachaturian “made a very full and humble apology for his artistic “errors” following the Zhdanov decree; his musical style, however, underwent no changes.”[40] He was sent to Armenia as a “punishment”,[10] and continued to be censured.[20] By December 1948,[20] he was “restored to favor later that year when he was praised for his film biography of Lenin”—Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (ru).[16]

historic musical bits: Schumann : Piano Quintet in E flat major, Op. 44 , Rudolf Serkin / Bush String Quartet (Rec. 1942)


Schumann : Piano Quintet in E flat major, Op. 44

great compositions/performances: Antonín Dvořák – Humoresque No. 7, Op. 101


Antonín DvořákHumoresque No. 7, Op. 101

today’s Holiday: Indian Arrival Day


Indian Arrival Day

The people of Trinidad and Tobago observe May 30 as Indian Arrival Day. This holiday honors the nation’s citizens of Indian descent and acknowledges their contribution to the social and cultural landscape of Trinidad and Tobago. In particular, it recalls the arrival of the first boats from India in 1845. The holiday is celebrated with reenactments of the arrival of the first ships bringing Indians to Trinidad, parades honoring the history of the nation’s Indian citizens and their festivals, and various cultural events. More… Discuss

 

Hector Berlioz – Waverly Overture Op.1 (1828)


 

Hector Berlioz – Waverly Overture Op.1 (1828)

 

historic musical bits: Sviatoslav Richter – Chopin – Andante spianato et grande polonaise brillante in E-flat major, Op 22


Sviatoslav Richter – Chopin – Andante spianato et grande polonaise brillante in E-flat major, Op 22

historic musical bits: Beethoven – String Quartet No.5 in A major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952


 

Beethoven – String Quartet No.5 in A major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952

 

Mozart – Symphony No. 38 in D, K. 504 (Prague)


 

Mozart – Symphony No. 38 in D, K. 504  (Prague)

 

make music part of your life series: Krystian Zimerman plays Valses Nobles et Sentimentales (Maurice Ravel)


Krystian Zimerman plays Valses Nobles et Sentimentales (Maurice Ravel) – Complete

 

Historic Musical Bits: , Mendelssohn:, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Berliner Philharmoniker conductor: Ferenc Fricsay) Rita Streich & Diana Eustrati (1950)


Mendelssohn: A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Ferenc Fricsay) Rita Streich & Diana Eustrati

 

historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

great compositions/performances: Evgeny Kissin – Schumann-Liszt – Widmung (Liebeslied)



Evgeny Kissin – Schumann-Liszt – Widmung (Liebeslied)

great compositions/performances: Arabesque No. 1 from Deux Arabesques , Aldo Chiccolini


 


Debussy – Arabesque No. 1 (Ciccolini)

 

Historic musical bits: Richard Strauss: Death and Transfiguration, Op. 24, (Orchestra Sinfonica di Torino della Rai Conductor Sergiu Celibidache (1970)



Death and Transfiguration (Tod und Verklärung, Op. 24) : Richard Strauss

historic musical Bits: Rachmaninoff – Piano Concerto #2 in C Minor, Op. 18


Rachmaninoff – Piano Concerto #2 in C Minor, Op. 18 – HD

Historic Musical Bits: Isaac Stern – Edouard Lalo – Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21


Édouard Lalo

Édouard Lalo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Isaac Stern – Edouard Lalo – Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21

Published on Oct 24, 2012

Eugene Ormandy conducting Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra
I. Allegro non troppo
II. Scherzando
III. Intermezzo
IV. Andante
V. Rondo

*****************************************************************************

The Symphonie espagnole in D minor, Op. 21, is a work for violin and orchestra by Édouard Lalo.

History

The work was written in 1874 for violinist Pablo de Sarasate, and premiered in Paris in February 1875.

Although called a “Spanish Symphony” (see also Sinfonia concertante), it is considered a violin concerto by musicians today. The piece has Spanish motifs throughout, and launched a period when Spanish-themed music came into vogue. (Georges Bizet‘s opera Carmen premiered a month after the Symphonie espagnole.)

The Symphonie espagnole is one of Lalo’s two most often played works, the other being his Cello Concerto. His “official” Violin Concerto in F, and his Symphony in G minor, written thirteen years later, are neither performed nor recorded as often.[citation needed]

Structure

  1. Allegro non troppo
  2. Scherzando: Allegro molto
  3. Intermezzo: Allegro non troppo
  4. Andante
  5. Rondo: Allegro

A typical performance runs just over one-half hour. One of the shorter recordings, conductor Eugene Ormandy’s 1967 recording with the Philadelphia Orchestra, featuring violinist Isaac Stern, runs 32 minutes and 43 seconds.[1]

Influence on Tchaikovsky

The Symphonie espagnole had some influence on the genesis of Tchaikovsky‘s Violin Concerto in D major. In March 1878, Tchaikovsky was staying at Nadezhda von Meck‘s estate at Clarens, Switzerland, while recovering from the breakdown of his disastrous marriage and his subsequent suicide attempt. His favourite pupil (and possibly his lover), the violinist Iosif Kotek, shortly arrived from Berlin with a lot of new music for violin. These included the Symphonie espagnole, which he and Tchaikovsky played through to great delight. This gave Tchaikovsky the idea of writing a violin concerto, and he immediately set aside his current work on a piano sonata and started on the concerto on 17 March.[2] With Kotek’s technical help, the concerto was finished by 11 April.

References

 

 

 

Historic Musical Bits: Wilhelm Kempff plays Robert Schumann – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54 (Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischem Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik)


Robert Schumann – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54

Wilhelm Kempff, piano
Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischem Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik

Movements:

Allegro affettuoso (A minor) 00:00:00
Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (F major) 00:15:43
Allegro vivace (A major) 00:21:27
*****************************************************************
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54, is a Romantic concerto by Robert Schumann, completed in 1845. The work premiered in Leipzig on 1 January 1846 with Clara Schumann playing the solo part. Ferdinand Hiller, the work’s dedicatee, conducted.

History

Schumann had earlier worked on several piano concerti: he began one in E-flat major in 1828, from 1829–31 he worked on one in F major, and in 1839, he wrote one movement of a concerto in D minor. None of these works were completed.

In 1841, Schumann wrote a fantasy for piano and orchestra, his Phantasie. His pianist wife Clara urged him to expand this piece into a full piano concerto. In 1845 he added the intermezzo and finale to complete the work. It was the only piano concerto that Schumann completed.

The work may have been used as a model by Edvard Grieg in composing his own Piano Concerto, also in A minor. Grieg’s concerto, like Schumann’s, employs a single powerful orchestral chord at its introduction before the piano’s entrance with a similar descending flourish. Rachmaninov also used the work as a model for his first Piano Concerto.

After this concerto, Schumann wrote two other pieces for piano and orchestra: the Introduction and Allegro Appassionato in G major (Op. 92), and the Introduction and Allegro Concertante in D minor (Op. 134).

Instrumentation

The concerto is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani, strings, and solo piano.

Structure

The piece, as marked in the score, is in three movements:

  1. Allegro affettuoso (A minor)

  2. Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (F major)

  3. Allegro vivace (A major)

There is no break between these last two movements (attacca subito).

Schumann preferred that the movements be listed in concert programs as only two movements:[citation needed]

  1. Allegro affettuoso
  2. Andantino and Rondo

The three movement listing is the more common form used.

Allegro affettuoso

The piece starts with an energetic strike by strings and timpani, followed by a fierce, descending attack by the piano. The first theme is introduced by the oboe along with wind instruments. The theme is then given to the soloist. Schumann provides great variety with this theme. He first offers it in the A minor key of the piece, then we hear it again in major, and we can also hear small snatches of the tune in a very slow, A flat section. The clarinet is often used against the piano in this movement. Toward the end of the movement, the piano launches into a long cadenza before the orchestra joins in with one more melody and builds for the exciting finish.

Intermezzo

This movement is keyed in F major. The piano and strings open up the piece with a small, delicate tune, which is heard throughout the movement before the cellos and later the other strings finally take the main theme, with the piano mainly used as accompaniment. The movement closes with small glimpses of the first movement’s theme before moving straight into the third movement.

Allegro vivace

The movement opens with a huge run up the strings while the piano takes the main, A major theme. Schumann shows great color and variety in this movement. The tune is regal, and the strings are noble. Though it is in 3/4 timing, Schumann manipulates it so that the time signature is often ambiguous. The piece finishes with a restating of the previous material before finally launching into an exciting finale, and ending with a long timpani roll and a huge chord from the orchestra.

Further reading

 

Historic Musical Bits: Wieniawski – Violin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22 Isaac Stern and Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy: conductor-1957


Isaak Stern plays Wieniawski-Violin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22 

Fantasia and Fugue in G minor BWV 542


Fantasia and Fugue in G minor BWV 542