Tag Archives: Violin

historic musical bits: Itzhak Perlman – Pugnani Kreisler-Preludium and Allegro


Itzhak Perlman-Pugnani Kreisler-Preludium and Allegro

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Paganini: Cantabile op. 17 | Keiko Yamaguchi, violin


Paganini: Cantabile op. 17 | Keiko Yamaguchi, violin

Best musical bits, Oistrakh plays Wieniawski Legende op.17 , great compositions/performances


Oistrakh plays Wieniawski Legende op.17

Historic musical bits, Mozart Violin Concerto N°4 in D major, K218. David Oistrakh, violin, great compositons/performances


Mozart Violin Concerto N°4 in D major, K 218. David Oistrakh, violin )

Itzhak Perlman – J. Massenet “Thais” Meditation: great compositions/performances


Itzhak Perlman – J. Massenet “Thais” Meditation

37,413 views 2 years ago
Jules MassenetThaïs” Meditation
Itzhak Perlman – Violin
Lawrence Foster – Conductor
The Abbey Road Ensemble
Photography and filming by myself at Praia da Rocha, Algarve, Portugal

Méditation (Thaïs)
Méditation is a symphonic intermezzo from the opera Thaïs by French composer Jules Massenet. The piece is written for solo violin and orchestra. The opera was first premiered at the Opéra Garnier in Paris on March 16, 1894.

The Méditation is a symphonic entr’acte performed between the scenes of Act II in the opera Thaïs. In the first scene of Act II, Athanaël, a Cenobite monk, confronts Thaïs, a beautiful and hedonistic courtesan and devotée of Venus, and attempts to convince her to leave her life of luxury and pleasure and find salvation through God. It is during a time of reflection following the encounter that the Méditation is played by the orchestra. In the second scene of Act II, following the Méditation, Thaïs tells Athanaël that she will follow him to the desert.

The piece is in D major and is approximately five minutes long (although there are a number of interpretations that stretch the piece to over six minutes). Massenet may also have written the piece with religious intentions; the tempo marking is Andante Religioso, signifying his intention that it should be played religiously and at walking tempo. The piece opens with a short introduction by the harps, with the solo violin quickly entering with the motif. After the violin plays the melody twice, the piece goes into a section marked animato, gradually becoming more and more passionate (Massenet wrote poco a poco appassionato). The climax is reached at a place marked poco piu appassionato (a little more passion) and is then followed by a short cadenza-like passage from the soloist and returns to the main theme. After the theme is played twice, the soloist joins the orchestra while playing harmonics on the upper register as the harps and strings quietly play below the solo line.

SAINT-SAËNS Violin Sonata No.1 – A.Pascal, I.Philipp, 1934 *vinyl remaster*: make music part of your life series


SAINT-SAËNS Violin Sonata No.1 – A.Pascal, I.Philipp, 1934 *vinyl remaster*

Isaac Stern – Beethoven, Thriple Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra Op.56: great compositions/performances


Isaac Stern – Beethoven, Thriple Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra Op.56

Stradivarius


Stradivarius

A Stradivarius is a stringed instrument made by Italian luthier Antonio Stradivari. His “Strads” are famous for their tonal quality and are highly prized by world-class musicians and collectors. Many artisans have since tried to imitate his style of workmanship. Fewer than 700 genuine Strads are believed to be left in existence. Those that have survived are often identified by the names of previous owners. The famed “Lady Blunt” violin was auctioned in 2011 to help raise money for what cause? More… Discuss

Franz Schubert – Quintet for piano, violin, viola, cello & double-bass, in A major, D 667 “The Trout: great compositions/performances


Franz Schubert – Quintet for piano, violin, viola, cello & double-bass, in A major, D 667 “The Trout

Camille Saint-Saëns – Danse Macabre (National Philharmonic Orchestra, conductor:Leopold Stokowski): great compositions/performances


Sergei Prokofiev – Overture on Hebrew Themes, Op. 34: make music part of your life series


Sergei Prokofiev – Overture on Hebrew Themes, Op. 34

Prazak Quartet & Zemlinsky Quartet : Felix Mendelssohn String octet E-flat major Op. 20: great compositions/performances


Prazak Quartet & Zemlinsky Quartet : Felix Mendelssohn String octet E-flat major Op. 20

Eliot Fisk and Chiara Morandi play “Sonata concertata” for guitar and violin by Paganin


Eliot Fisk and Chiara Morandi play “Sonata concertata” for guitar and violin by Paganini

Alexander Borodin: String Quartet no. 2 in D: Great compositions/performances


Alexander Borodin: String Quartet no. 2 in D

Brahms-Violin Sonata No. 2 in A Major Op. 100: make music part of your life series


BrahmsViolin Sonata No. 2 in A Major Op. 100

FROM:
Kanaal van viool7

Isaac Stern: violin-Myra Hess: piano-Live-Edinburgh-1960

Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 (make music part of your life series)


[youtube.com/watch?v=Rt9j8sypi00]

Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1, in G major, op. 40 

Igor Ozim, violin
Vienna Opera Orchestra
Moshe Atzmon

Beethoven’s reputation as a pianist often obscures the fact that he was a very capable violinist. Although not an accomplished master, he possessed a profound love for and understanding of the instrument, evident in his ten violin sonatas, the violin concerto, and numerous quintets, quartets, and other chamber works. The two Romances for violin stand out because they are single-movement works in concerto settings. The Romance in G major was published in 1803 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel in Leipzig; the date of its first performance is not known. Despite the lower opus number, it was composed at least five years after the Romance in F, Op. 50, which was published in 1805. He retained the early Classical orchestra he employed for his earlier Piano Concerto in B flat, Op. 19: one flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, and strings. Often described as a “preparation” for the Violin Concerto, Op. 61, of 1806, the Romance in G stands as a fine work in its own right, clearly demonstrating Beethoven’s mastery of the high-Classical style of Mozart and Haydn. Furthermore, Beethoven creates subtle connections between disparate sections of a work.

Cast in a two-episode rondo format (ABACA coda), the Romance in G is not imbued with sonata-form characteristics, as are many of Beethoven’s later rondo movements. The rondo theme (A) is in two parts, each performed first by the soloist then repeated by the orchestra. Descending sixteenth notes in the solo part mark the beginning of B, in which the orchestra is relegated to a purely accompanimental role, creating unity by including figures from the rondo. Section B spends a significant amount of time on the dominant (D major); however, this does not represent a modulation but a preparation for the return of the rondo in G major. Again, the soloist performs both segments of the A section alone, this time including a running eighth note accompaniment under each of the literally repeated themes. Beethoven set the second episode, C, in E minor. The minor mode, dotted rhythms, and staccato passages give the section a “gypsy” music tinge. The foray into a new key area ends with the return of the G major rondo theme, again played by the soloist, but with accompaniment by the orchestra. Beethoven forgoes the repetition of each of the two parts of the rondo and ends the work with a brief coda featuring a lengthy trill in the solo violin. The three fortissimo chords that close the piece seem oddly, possibly comically, out of place in this generally quiet work, but they do resemble the orchestral string parts at the end of each rondo section. [allmusic.com]

make music part of your life series: Vittorio Monti – Csardas by Clara Cernat and Thierry Huillet


[youtube.com/watch?v=cMOHAcjlIWs]

make music part of your life series: Vittorio Monti – Csardas by Clara Cernat and Thierry Huillet

Vittorio Monti : “Csardas”, “Czardas” for violin and piano
Clara Cernat, violin
Thierry Huillet, piano
Piano part : Thierry Huillet’s improvisations
Video directed by Nicolas KAUFFMANN
Sound engineer : Jérôme HALLAY

Links:
http://www.pianoviolon.com/

Official Website of Clara Cernat and Thierry Huillet
http://www.musique21.com/
Official Website of Thierry Huillet
All CDs available on http://musique21.com/boutique-eng/
http://www.pianoviolon.com/

Official Website of Clara Cernat and Thierry Huillet
http://www.musique21.com/
Official Website of Thierry Huillet musique21

Vittorio Monti

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Vittorio Monti (6 January 1868 – 20 June 1922) was an Italian composer, violinist, mandolinist and conductor. His most famous work is his Csárdás, written around 1904 and played by almost every gypsy orchestra.

Monti was born in Naples, where he studied violin and composition at the Conservatorio di San Pietro a Majella. Around 1900 he received an assignment as the conductor for the Lamoureux Orchestra in Paris, where he wrote several ballets and operettas, for example, Noël de Pierrot. He also wrote a method for mandolin Petite Méthode pour Mandoline, 98049, in which he included some of his own works, Perle Brillante, Dans Una Gondola, and Au Petit Jour. There were also works by F. Paolo Tosti.[1]

Ion Voicu – Felmake music part of your life series: Mendelssohn – Concerto In E minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 64


[youtube.com/watch?v=Stc6zJxEf-s]

Ion Voicu – Felix Mendelssohn – Concerto In E minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 64

 

Make Music Part of Your Life: Vivaldi Concerto con molti istromenti in C major, RV558


[youtube.com/watch?v=ehv35TdZV-Q]

Vivaldi Concerto con molti istromenti in C major, RV558

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678 † 1741)

Work: Concerto for 2 violins in troba marina, 2 recorders, 2 chalumeaux, 2 theorbos, 2 mandolins, violoncello, strings and basso continuo in C major, RV558

1.Movement: Allegro molto
2.Movement: Andante molto
3.Movement: Allegro

Performer:
Violins: Fabio Biondi, Lorenzo Colitto, Raffaello Negri, Carla Marotta
Violins in troba marina: Fabio Biondi, Lorenzo Colitto, Renata Spotti, Luca Giardini
Viola all’inglese: Fabio Biondi, Ernesto Braucher
Cellos: Maurizio Naddeo, Antonio Fantinuoli
Mandolines: Giovanni Scaramuzzino, Sonia Maurer
Recorders: Petr Zejfart, Maurice Steger
Oboes: Stefano Vezzani, Simone Toni, Claudio Pinardi
Bassoon: Francois de Rudder
Chalumeaux: Gili Rinot, Carles Riera
Theorbos: Giangiacomo Pinardi, Ugo Nastrucci
Harpsichords: Sergio Ciomei, Paola Erdas

Fabio Biondi, violin & direction
Europa Galante

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Camille Saint-Saëns – Danse Macabre



Danse Macabre (first performed in 1875) is the name of opus 40 by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns.

The composition is based upon a poem by Henri Cazalis, on an old French superstition: Zig, zig, zig, Death in a cadence, Striking with his heel a tomb, Death at midnight plays a dance-tune, Zig, zig, zig, on his violin. The winter wind blows and the night is dark; Moans are heard in the linden trees. Through the gloom, white skeletons pass, Running and leaping in their shrouds. Zig, zig, zig, each one is frisking, The bones of the dancers are heard to crack— But hist! of a sudden they quit the round, They push forward, they fly; the cock has crowed.

According to the ancient superstition, “Death” appears at midnight every year on Halloween. Death has the power to call forth the dead from their graves to dance for him while he plays his fiddle (represented by a solo violin with its E-string tuned to an E-flat in an example of scordatura tuning). His skeletons dance for him until the first break of dawn, when they must return to their graves until the next year.

The piece opens with a harp playing a single note, D, twelve times to signify the clock striking midnight, accompanied by soft chords from the string section. This then leads to the eerie E flat and A chords (also known as a tritone or the “Devil’s chord“) played by a solo violin, representing death on his fiddle. After which the main theme is heard on a solo flute and is followed by a descending scale on the solo violin. The rest of the orchestra, particularly the lower instruments of the string section, then joins in on the descending scale. The main theme and the scale is then heard throughout the various sections of the orchestra until it breaks to the solo violin and the harp playing the scale. The piece becomes more energetic and climaxes at this point; the full orchestra playing with strong dynamics.Towards the end of the piece, there is another violin solo, now modulating, which is then joined by the rest of the orchestra. The final section, a pianissimo, represents the dawn breaking and the skeletons returning to their graves.

The piece makes particular use of the xylophone in a particular theme to imitate the sounds of rattling bones. Saint-Saëns uses a similar motif in the Fossils part of his Carnival of the Animals.
[from Wikipedia]

Artwork:Remedios Varo,”Les Feuilles Mortes”.
Played by:National Philharmonic Orchestra,
conductor:Leopold Stokowski.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: G. Gershwin – Walking the Dog (Promenade)



Julian Milkis – Clarinet, Mikhail Kopelmanviolin, Päivyt Meller – violin, Ulla Soinne – viola, Seppo Kimanen – cello.
Recorded at Sibelius Academy of Music on November 24, 2012 by 
ABG World, Video and Audio Production.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven – Violin Sonata No. 3 in Eb, op. 12 no. 3



I. Allegro con spirito [0:00]
II. Adagio con molta espressione [8:52]
III. Rondo: Allegro molto [14:19]

Hiro Kurosaki, violin
Linda Nicholson, fortepiano

performed on period instruments

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonin Dvorak: Humoresque #7 in Gb Op 101/7: Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman


Humoresques (Czech: Humoresky), Op. 101 (B. 187), is a piano cycle by the Czech composer Antonín Dvořák, written during the summer of 1894. One writer says “the seventh Humoresque is probably the most famous small piano work ever written after Beethoven‘s Für Elise[1]

History
During his stay in America, when Dvořák was director of the Conservatory in New York from 1892 to 1895, the composer collected many interesting musical themes in his sketchbooks. He used some of these ideas in other compositions, notably the “From the New World” Symphony, the “American” String Quartet, the Quintet in E Flat Major, and the Sonatina for Violin, but some remained unused.

In 1894 Dvořák spent the summer with his family in Bohemia, at Vysoká u Příbrami. During this “vacation”, Dvořák began to use the collected material and to compose a new cycle of short piano pieces. On 19 July 1894 Dvořák sketched the first Humoresque in B major, today number 6 in the cycle. However, the composer soon started to create scores for the pieces that were intended to be published. The score was completed on 27 August 1894.
The cycle was entitled Humoresques shortly before Dvořák sent the score to his German publisher F. Simrock. The composition was published by Simrock in Autumn, 1894.
The publisher took advantage of the great popularity of the seventh Humoresque to produce arrangements for many instruments and ensembles. The piece was later also published as a song with various lyrics. It has also been arranged for choir.[2] The melody was also used as the theme of Slappy Squirrel in the popular animated television show Animaniacs. In 2004 the vocal group Beethoven’s Wig used Humoresque as the basis for a song entitled Dvořák the Czechoslovak.
Structure
The cycle consists of eight pieces:

  1. Vivace (E♭ minor)
  2. Poco andante (B major)
  3. Poco andante e molto cantabile (A♭ major)
  4. Poco andante (F major)
  5. Vivace (A minor)
  6. Poco allegretto (B major)
  7. Poco lento e grazioso (G♭ major)
  8. Poco andante—Vivace–Meno mosso, quasi Tempo I (B minor)

The main theme of the first Humoresque was sketched in New York on New Year’s Eve 1892, with the inscription “Marche funèbre” (sic).[3] The minor theme was accompanied with the inscription “people singing in the street”. The opening theme of the fourth piece was also sketched in New York, among ideas intended for the unrealized opera Hiawatha. The “American” style is also apparent in other themes of the Humoresques.[4]

Buy “Humoresque No. 7 in G-flat Major, Op. 101” on

Google PlayAmazonMP3iTune
Related articles

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Great Compositions/Performances: Leonid Kogan – Mozart – Adagio in E major, K 261


Leonid Kogan – Mozart – Adagio in E major, K 261

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:
Adagio in E major for violin and orchestra, K 261
Leonid Kogan, violin
Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra
Pavel Kogan, conductor
(Live recording, May 1981)

Buy “Adagio for Violin and Orchestra in E Major K 261” on

Google PlayiTunesAmazonMP3

  • Artist
    Leonid Kogan, Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra, Pavel Kogan

 

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Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 in G major, Op. 40


[youtube.com/watch?v=L8bcKlEP_Mo]

Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 in G major, Op. 40

Emmy Verhey, Violin. Brabant Orchestra, Eduardo Marturet

 

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Great Performances: Leonid Kogan – Cantabile, Paganini



  • Leonid Borisovich Kogan was a preeminent Soviet violinist during the 20th century. He is considered to have been one of the greatest representatives of the Soviet School of violin playing. Wikipedia

 

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Menuhin – Paganini Moto Perpetuo



Yehudi Menuhin performs Paganini‘s Moto Perpetuo with Adolph Baller (1947) Enjoy!

 

Marais: Bells of St. Genevieve (Ralph Rousseau Meulenbroeks, viola da gambist)



“Sonnerie de Ste-Geneviève du Mont-de-Paris (“The Bells of St. Genevieve” in English) is a work by Marin Marais written in 1723 for viol, violin and harpsichord with basso continuo. It can be considered a passacaglia or a chaconne, with a repeating D, F, E bass line. Being a student of Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe, it is perhaps Marais’ most famous composition that explores the various techniques of the viol.
The work begins with 4 measures of the bass line played by the continuo and viol, then, on the 5th measure the violin takes over the melody. Throughout the piece, the violin and viol take turns with the melody.

The viol part is of great difficulty because of Marais’s mastery of that instrument. The centerpiece is not the melody, the violin, but the viol. His work can be thought of as something to showcase the violist‘s skill, despite that it does not always have the melody.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonnerie…

This piece is performed by viola da gambist Ralph Rousseau Meulenbroeks. This and other albums by this artist can be downloaded at Magnatune.com.

****************************************­******

Check out my playlists:
http://www.youtube.com/user/christoma…

 

Leonid Kogan – Schumann – Fantasie in C major, Op 131 (Live recording, 1953)



Robert Schumann
Fantasie in C major, Op 131
(arranged for violin and piano)

Leonid Kogan, violin
Andrei Mytnik, piano

Live recording, 1953

Today’s Birthday: NICCOLÒ PAGANINI (1782) Leonid Kogan plays “La Campanella”


Niccolò Paganini (1782)

An Italian violinist and composer whose virtuosity is the stuff of legend, Paganini was playing with an orchestra by the age of nine. By the time he reached adulthood, the renowned violinist had also earned a reputation as a shameless womanizer and inveterate gambler. The latter vice once even cost him his prized violin. Nevertheless, he had a profound influence on the evolution of violin technique. Why did the Catholic Church deny him burial in consecrated ground for years following his death? More… Discuss

EDWARD ELGAR.- Concierto violín y orquesta Op. 61.-Violín Kyung Wha Chuhg



Concierto violín y orquesta en si menor, Op. 61
Allegro
Andante
Allegro molto

VIOLÍN : KYUNG WHA CHUNG
ORQUESTA FILARMÓNICA DE LONDRES
DIRECTOR : SIR GEORG SOLTI

 

Mendelssohn Violin Concerto E Minor OP.64 (Full Length) : Hilary Hahn & FRSO



Mendelssohn Violin Concerto E Minor OP.64 (Full Length)
Violin : 힐러리 한 Hilary Hahn
Conductor : 파보 예르비 Paavo Jarvi 
Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra 
11th,Jun,2012. Korean Art Centre Concert Hall,Seoul Korea.
—————————————-­———————
I. Allegro molto appassionato-[0:01]
II. Andante-[13:20]
III. Allegretto non troppo — Allegro molto vivace-[20:52]
—————————————-­———————
Trivia : Not FPSO But FRSO (just joking~~lol)
Better Known as Ice Princess “Hahn” 
She Plays together with FRSO & “Paavo” in S.Korea.
(How Various Nationalities~~lol)
Meanwhile,
Do you know that..?
Her Korean Name is Hahn Hye-Ri (한혜리 韓惠莉 )~~
~~Believe it or not..
—————————————-­—————————–
▶ Let’s Listen Symphony & Piano Concerto COLLECTION
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

 

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809-1847): Violin Concerto in D Minor



Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy: Violin Concerto in D Minor
ARTHUR GRUMIAUX – Violin

New Philharmonia Orchestra
Conductor:  Jan Krenz,  1972

 

Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 35 in A, K.526



I. Molto allegro [0:00]
II. Andante [9:30]
III. Presto [19:50]

Sigiswald Kuijken, violin
Luc Devos, fortepiano

performed on period instruments

Painting of Mozart by Barbara Krafft

 

Mikhail Pletnev & Soloists Ensemble play Glinka: Grand Sextet in E flat major for piano, string quartet and double bass



Mikhail Pletnev & Soloists Ensemble play Glinka Grand Sextet in E flat major for piano, string quartet and double bass.  Recording in 1993 by Olympia.
Mikhail Pletnev, piano
Alexei Bruni, violin
Mikhail Moshkunov, violin
Andrei Kevorkov, viola
Erik Pozdeev, cello
Nikolai Gorbunov, double bass
I. Allegro
II. Andante – (attacca). 
III. Finale. Allegro con spirito

Leonid Kogan – Schumann – Fantasie in C major, Op 131


Robert Schumann
Fantasie in C major, Op 131
(arranged for violin and piano)

Leonid Kogan, violin
Andrei Mytnik, piano

Live recording, 1953

 

Rondo for violin & orchestra in B flat major, K. 269


Mozart – Violin Concerto No. 1 in B flat, K. 207



Mozart – Violin Concerto No. 1 in B flat, K. 207
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart‘s Violin Concerto No. 1 in B flat major, K. 207, was originally supposed to have been composed in 1775 (when Mozart was 19), along with the other four wholly authentic violin concerti. However, analysis of handwriting and the manuscript paper on which the concerto was written suggest that the actual date of composition might have been 1773. It has a common three-movement structure. Movements are:
1. Allegro Moderato
2. Adagio
and 3. Presto,
in the usual fast-slow-fast structure. The concerto is full of brilliant passage work with running sixteenth notes and is generally characterized by high spirits. The Rondo in B-flat, K. 269 for violin and orchestra, is also connected to this concerto. It was intended to replace the finale movement, and was composed to fulfill the recommendation of Antonio Brunetti, a violinist in Salzburg at the time. Nonetheless, the concerto is typically performed with the original finale, and the K. 269 Rondo remains a separate concert-piece.

Antonín Dvořák – Romance for Violin & Orchestra in F minor, Op. 11



Rudolf Firkusny, piano. Ruggiero Ricci, violin. Zara Nelsova, cello. Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, Walter Susskind

Antonín Dvořák – Romance for Violin & Orchestra in F minor, Op. 11 9’51

 

L. Boccherini: Guitar-Quintet No. 1, I. Allegro moderato – “Boccherini Ensemble”



Luigi Boccherini (1743 – 1805)

Guitar-Quintet No. 1 in D-Minor (G. 445)
I. Allegro moderato

Boccherini Ensemble:
Gerald Smrzek (Austria) – Guitar, 
Valbona Naku (Albania) – Violin, 
Armando Toledo (Cuba) – Violin, 
Lina Jihye Kim (Korea) – Viola, 
M. d. G. (Italy) – Violoncello
[June 25, 2010 – Salvatorsaal (Vienna/Austria)]

 

Ludwig van Beethoven — Piano Trio in B flat major, Op. 97 BEETHOVEN, Trio in B flat major for Piano, Violin, Violoncello Op.97 “Erzherzog – Trio”


[youtube.com/watch?v=hQhyByyotJY]

Piano: Stefan Mendl 
Violin: Wolfgang Redik 
Violoncello: Marcus Trefny

Ruggiero RICCI @ PAGANINI Moses Fantasy – S.Cardi, guitar 1993



Niccolò PAGANINI: Introduzione, Tema con Variazioni, sulla preghiera “Dal tuo stellato soglio” dal Mosè in Egitto di G. ROSSINI, in F minor MS.23 (1818-19)
Ruggiero RICCI, violin – Stefano Cardi, guitar (rec: 1993)

Antonio Vivaldi “L`amoroso” I Musici



Concerto in E Major, RV 271 (PV 246)
“L´amoroso” by Antonio Vivaldi
Felix Ayo, violin
I Musici

Ludwig van Beethoven: Violin Sonata Op. 96 in G Major



ARTHUR GRUMIAUX – VIOLIN
Clara Haskill – Piano

Wieniawski-Violin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22: Isaac Stern, violin – Philadelphia Orchestra – Eugene Ormandy, Conductor – 1957



Isaac Stern: violin-Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy: conductor-1957

Fritz Kreisler plays Tambourin Chinois – Franz Rupp – Piano



Fritz Kreisler – Violin
Franz Rupp – Piano

Robert Schumann Fantasy for Violin and Orchestra Op. 131



Ossia Symphony Orchestra
Heesun Shin, violin
Orlando Alonso, conductor

Isaac Stern – Beethoven, Triple Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra



Ludwig Van Beethoven [ 1770 – 1827 ],
Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra
In C Major Op.56 ‘Thriple Concerto’

I. Allegro
II. Largo – attacca
III. Rondo Alla Polacca Allegro tempo I.

Violin ; Isaac Stern [ 1920 – 2001 ]
Piano ; Emanuel Ax [ 1949 – ]
Cello ; Yo-Yo Ma [ 1955 – ]

Conducted By ; Michael Stern
London Symphony Orchestra
Narrated By ; Gregory Peck

From Album [ 1992, Sony Classical LD ]
Isaac Stern A Biography In Music
Live At Royal Festival Hall

 

Corigliano- The Red Violin Song ( wonderful interpretation): Anna Skálová, violin Nan Washburn, conductor Michigan Philharmonic October 8, 2011



Anna Skálová, violin
Nan Washburn, conductor
Michigan Philharmonic
October 8, 2011



Niccolò Paganini

Cantabile for violin & guitar in D

The Diaz Trio (on Modern Instruments)
Julian Gray, guitar