Tag Archives: london symphony orchestra

historic musical bits: David Oistrach plays Bruch’s-Scottish Fantasy in E-flat Major Op. 46, London Symphony Orchestra, Jascha Horenstein, conducting, 1962.


Bruch-Scottish Fantasy in E-flat Major Op. 46

Advertisements

great compositions/performances: Yuja Wang plays Gershwin : Piano Concerto in F (1925)


Yuja Wang plays Gershwin : Piano Concerto in F (1925)

historic musical bits: Abbado conducts Prokofiev – Symphony No. 1 in D major ‘Classical’, Op. 25


Abbado conducts Prokofiev – Symphony No. 1 in D major ‘Classical’, Op. 25

historic musical bits: Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin – Piano Concerto No 2 in F minor, Op 21/ London Symphony Orchestra André Previn, conductor Classical Vault 2 Classical Vault 2


Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin – Piano Concerto No 2 in F minor, Op 21

great compositions/performances: Claudio Abbado “Overture “The Fair Melusina” Mendelssohn


Claudio Abbado “Overture “The Fair Melusina” Mendelssohn

today’s Holiday/celebration: Boston Pops Boston Pops 1812 July 4, 1976 Bicentennial (Rare footage of Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops)



Boston Pops 1812,  July 4, 1976 Bicentennial at Hollywood Bowl

(Rare footage of Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops)

Boston Pops

Henry Lee Higginson, who established the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1881, believed that “concerts of a lighter kind of music” should be presented in the summer. People began to refer fondly to these summer concerts as “the Pops,” a name which became official in 1900. The Boston Pops tailors its programs around American music and musicians, medleys of popular songs, and familiar movements of classical works. Outside of its official concert season at Symphony Hall, where it performs through May and June, the Pops also tours the United States. More… Discuss

Brahms Serenade No. 2 in A, Op. 16 LSO / Kertesz


Brahms Serenade No. 2 in A, Op. 16 LSO / Kertesz

Rachmaninoff Variation 18 Rhapsody on Themes of Paganini Valentina Lisitsa , Great compositions/performances


Rachmaninoff Variation 18 Rhapsody on Themes of Paganini Valentina Lisitsa

Dame Joan Sutherland. Pastorale. Igor Stravinsky.


Dame Joan Sutherland. Pastorale. Igor Stravinsky.

Rimsky-Korsakov – Fairy Tale (skazka), Op. 29 , great compositions/performances


Rimsky-Korsakov – Fairy Tale (skazka), Op. 29

Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra , great compositions/performances


Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra

Mozart – Symphony No. 35 in D, K. 385 (Haffner) , great compositions/performances


Mozart – Symphony No. 35 in D, K. 385 (Haffner)

Uploaded on Feb 23, 2012

Symphony No. 35 in D major, K. 385, was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1782 and is also called the Haffner Symphony. It was commissioned by the Haffners, a prominent Salzburg family, for the occasion of Sigmund Haffner’s ennoblement. The Haffner Symphony should not be confused with the eight-movement Haffner Serenade, another piece Mozart wrote on commission from the same family in 1776. The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D and G, 2 trumpets in D, timpani, and strings. Mozart’s choice of key for the Haffner Symphony is an aspect that catches one’s attention. According to Cuyler, “the key of D major, which was so felicitous for the winds, served Mozart more often than any other key, even C, for his symphonies,” including the Paris (No. 31) and Prague (No. 38) symphonies. The key is also indicative of the work’s serenade origins as all of Mozart’s orchestral serenades are scored in D major. Hence, it is not surprising that the Haffner Symphony was written in the key of D major. The symphony is in four movements:
1. Allegro con spirito, 4/4
2. Andante, 2/4
3. Menuetto, 3/4
4. Presto, 2/2.
The Haffner Symphony usually runs somewhere around 20 minutes in length. A recording by George Szell with the Cleveland Orchestra (Sony SBK 46333) runs 19.11; one by Iona Brown with the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields (Haenssler CD 94.003) is 21.09; and one by Sir Neville Marriner also with the same ensemble (Philips 420 486-2) runs 21.34.
—————————————-­————————————-
FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 1 in E flat major, great compositions/performances


Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 1 in E flat major

Beethoven, Piano Concerto No. 2 Op. 19 in B flat major. Evgeny Kissin , make music pat of your life series


Beethoven, Piano Concerto No. 2 Op. 19 in B flat major. Evgeny Kissin

Great musical recordings: Brahms – Wilhelm Kempff 1950’s legacy (op. 10, 24, 76,79,116,117,118,119): Great compositions/performances


Brahms – Wilhelm Kempff 1950’s legacy (op. 10, 24, 76,79,116,117,118,119)

Maurice Ravel – Introduction & Allegro for Harp, Flute, Clarinet & String Quartet(1905) : Great compositions/performances|Art by Jean-Léon Gérôme


Maurice Ravel – Introduction & Allegro for Harp, Flute, Clarinet & String Quartet(1905)

Rimsky-Korsakov – Mlada Suite, Procession of the Nobles – Svetlanov,: great compositions/performances


Rimsky-Korsakov – Mlada Suite, Procession of the Nobles – Svetlanov

Carl Maria von Weber, Konzertstück f-moll für Klavier und Orchester, Op.79. Alfred Brendel & London Symphony Orchestra: great compositions/performances


Carl Maria von Weber, Konzertstück f-moll für Klavier und Orchester, Op.79. Alfred Brendel & LSO

Schubert – 4 Impromptus, D. 899 / Op. 90, Maria João Pires,: great compositions/performances


Schubert – 4 Impromptus, D. 899 / Op. 90 (Maria João Pires)

Barbirolli – Arensky: Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky,: great compositions/performances


[embes]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRKiE8o3NQU[/embed]

Barbirolli – Arensky: Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky (improved sound)

Ravel – Daphnis et Chloé, Suite n°2 (Seiji Ozawa),: GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES


Ravel – Daphnis et Chloé, Suite n°2 (Seiji Ozawa)

Rimsky-Korsakov – Christmas Eve: Orchestral Suite (1895): Great compositions/performances


Rimsky-Korsakov – Christmas Eve: Orchestral Suite (1895)

Alexander Borodin In The Steppes Of Central Asia: make music part of your life series


Mozart – Symphony No. 39 in E flat, K. 543: make music part of your life series


Mozart – Symphony No. 39 in E flat, K. 543

Ottorino Respighi Brazilian Impressions (Antal Dorati/LSO): great compositions/performances


Ottorino Respighi Brazilian Impressions (Antal Dorati / London Symphony Orchestra)

today’s birthday: Domenico Scarlatti (1685)


Domenico Scarlatti (1685)

Although he lived during the Baroque era, Scarlatti, an Italian composer and virtuoso harpsichordist, was extremely influential in the development of the Classical period of music. He is best known for his composition of 555 keyboard sonatas, written for the Spanish queen Maria Bárbara, whom he had tutored as a child and in whose service he remained for much of his life. Scarlatti is said to have engaged in a keyboard competition with what other composer as a young man? More… Discuss

Weber – Jubel Ouvertüre – LSO / Monteux: make music part of your life series


Weber – Jubel Ouvertüre – LSO / Monteux

Daniil Trifonov – Glazunov Piano Concerto No 2 in B major: great compositions/performances


Daniil Trifonov – Glazunov Piano Concerto No 2 in B major

MUSSORGSKY (arr. Stokowski) Night on Bald Mountain: great compositions/performances


MUSSORGSKY (arr. Stokowski) Night on Bald Mountain

Here is Leopold Stokowski‘s (1882-1977) transcription of Modest Mussorgsky‘s “Night on Bald Mountain”. This is the version most famously featured as the ending sequence of the Disney film “Fantasia” (1948), and that most famously caused quite an uproar among movie-goers due to the demonic imagery used in the aforementioned clip.

Stokowski was a prodigy along the lines of Maazel, entering into the Royal Academy of Music to study composition and conducting at the age of merely 13. During his long span as one of the most prominent and important conductors (not to mention one of the greatest) he was actually a very controversial figure. What many people probably don’t know is that Stokowski was a great champion of contemporary music, giving the U.S. and/or world premieres of works by Elgar, Vaughn Williams, Prokofiev, Schoenberg, Hovhaness, Copland, Barber, Berg, Feldman and other contemporary composers. He is also very important to the history of modern concert practice as well, popularizing the batonless technique of conducting, as well as inventing and popularizing the “pops concert” and the modern chairing of a symphony orchestra. He was able to produce what was then referred to as “the Stokowski Sound”, although what is now called “the Philly Sound” (one of the many, illustrious orchestras he was resident conductor for), and was the greatest influence on many conductors proceeding him, particularly Leonard Bernstein. His transcriptions and editing of works were considered uncoif at the time, a practice that had long since become outdated as printed music became more available, but they are now one of the things he is best-known for, particularly this and his orchestration of Bach’s Toccata en Fugue in D Minor BWV 565.

Performed here in 1966 by the London Symphony Orchestra.

Aram Khachaturian – Adagio of Spartacus and Phrygia: make music part of your life series


Edward Elgar – Allegro for strings, Op.47 & Serenade for strings, Op.20: make music part of your life series


Edward Elgar – Allegro for strings, Op.47 & Serenade for strings, Op.20

Ludwig van Beethoven: Romance for Violin No.1 in G major, Op.40: great compositions/performances


Ludwig van Beethoven: Romance for Violin No.1 in G major, Op.40

Modest Mussorgsky “Pictures at an Exhibition” Celibidache London Symphony Orchestra, conductor: Sergiu Celibidache: great compositions/performances


Modest Mussorgsky “Pictures at an Exhibition” Celibidache London Symphony Orchestra,  conductor: Sergiu Celibidache

G. Holst – The planets Op. 32 – Venus, the Bringer of Peace – Berliner Philharmoniker- Karajan: great compositions/performances


G. Holst – The planets Op. 32 – Venus, the Bringer of Peace – Berliner Philharmoniker- Karajan (2/7)

doramas67  doramas67
The Planets, Op. 32, is a seven-movement orchestral suite by the English composer Gustav Holst, written between 1914 and 1916. Each movement of the suite is named after a planet of the Solar System and its corresponding astrological character as defined by Holst. With the exception of Earth (the centre of all yet influentially inert astrologically[1]), all the astrological planets known during the work’s composition[2] are represented.

From its premiere to the present day, the suite has been enduringly popular, influential, widely performed and frequently recorded. The work was not heard in a complete public performance, however, until some years after it was completed. Although there were four performances between September 1918 and October 1920, they were all either private (the first performance, in London) or incomplete (two others in London and one in Birmingham). The premiere was at the Queen’s Hall on 29 September 1918, conducted by Holst’s friend Adrian Boult before an invited audience of about 250 people. The first complete public performance was finally given in London by Albert Coates conducting the London Symphony Orchestra on 15 November 1920.

Instrumentation

The work is scored for an exceptionally large orchestra:
Woodwind: 4 flutes (3rd doubling 1st piccolo; 4th doubling 2nd piccolo and a “bass flute in G”, actually an alto flute), 3 oboes (3rd doubling bass oboe), an English horn, 3 clarinets in B-flat, a bass clarinet in B-flat, 3 bassoons and a contrabassoon
Brass: 6 horns in F, 4 trumpets in C, 3 trombones (2 tenor and 1 bass), a “tenor tuba” (euphonium in B-flat) and a bass tuba
Keyboards: a celesta, and an organ
Percussion: 6 timpani (2 players, 3 drums each except in “Uranus” having 4 drums for 1st and 2 drums for 2nd), a bass drum, a snare drum, cymbals, a triangle, a tam-tam, a tambourine, a glockenspiel, a xylophone, and tubular bells
Strings: 2 harps, 1st and 2nd violins, violas, cellos, and double basses
Voices: (“Neptune” only), 2 three-part women’s choruses (SSA) located in an adjoining room which is to be screened from the audience

The suite has seven movements, each named after a planet and its corresponding astrological character (see Planets in astrology):

1.Mars, the Bringer of War
2.Venus, the Bringer of Peace
3.Mercury, the Winged Messenger
4.Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity
5.Saturn, the Bringer of Old Age
6.Uranus, the Magician
7.Neptune, the Mystic

The Planets (Los planetas) op. 32, es la obra más conocida del compositor inglés Gustav Holst y fue compuesta entre 1914 y 1918. Es una suite de siete movimientos a cada uno de los cuales Holst le dio el nombre de un planeta (y su correspondiente deidad en la mitología grecorromana).

The Planets, como reza su subtítulo, es una suite “para gran orquesta”. Instrumentos nada habituales, como la flauta baja o el oboe barítono o bajo y unos nutridos efectivos de percusión (bombo, batería, platillos, Triángulo (instrumento musical), tambor militar, pandereta, gong, campanas, xilófono y glockenspiel, así como dos timbalistas) y metal (6 trompas, 4 trompetas, 3 trombones, tuba tenor y tuba bajo) forman, entre otros, la nómina de la suite. Es quizás la orquesta más grande empleada jamás por Holst.

Estructura

La suite está formada por los siguientes movimientos:
Marte, el portador de la guerra.
Venus, el portador de la paz.
Mercurio, el mensajero alado.
Júpiter, el portador de la alegría.
Saturno, el portador de la vejez.
Urano, el mago.
Neptuno, el místico.

Frédéric Chopin – 24 Études Op. 10 & Op. 25 and 3 Nouvelles Études | Claudio Arrau, piano: make music part of your life series


Frédéric Chopin – 24 Études Op. 10 & Op. 25 and 3 Nouvelles Études | Claudio Arrau, piano

Frédéric Chopin – 12 Études Opp. 10 & 25. 3 Nouvelles Études. (Claudio Arrau, “The Philosopher of the Piano”, 1956) (2007 Digital Remastering)
Recorded: 15-22 & 29.VI. and 5.IX.1956, No.3, Abbey Road Studios, London. First issued in 1957 by Columbia Ltd. Mono/ADD
“Great Recordings of the 20th Century”. EMI Icons, EMI Classics, 2011 & Warner Classics, 2013.

I. Book No.1: 12 Etudes for Piano Op.10, 1830-32.
Before Chopin, there was a tradition of writing studies for the development of keyboard technique, but the pieces were primarily didactic. This set of 12 Études, dedicated to Liszt, represents a new form: concert pieces that serve a secondary function as development of advanced piano skills. Each étude begins with a pattern of pianistic figuration, which creates the specific technical problem for the étude and persists for the duration of the piece. That Chopin was able to create poetry in spite of such controlled and limited means of expression is a testament to his creative genius. The twelve Études published as Chopin’s Opus 10 are an indispensable tool of the modern pianist’s craft: they are a rite of passage that no serious pianist can ignore.
00:00 Nº 1 in C major. Allegro
01:59 Nº 2 in A minor. Allegro
03:23 Nº 3 in E major. Lento ma non troppo (Tritesse – L’intimite) – http://youtu.be/FKDir13g7ow
07:55 Nº 4 in C sharp minor. Presto (Torrent)
10:10 Nº 5 in G flat major. Vivace (Black Keys)
11:55 Nº 6 in E flat minor. Andante
14:49 Nº 7 in C major. Vivace (Toccata)
16:26 Nº 8 in F major. Allegro
18:51 Nº 9 in F minor. Allegro molto agitato
21:00 Nº 10 in A flat major. Vivace assai
23:14 Nº 11 in E flat major. Allegretto
26:17 Nº 12 in C minor. Allegro con fuoco (Revolutionary – Fall of Warsaw)

II. Book No.2: 12 Etudes for Piano Op.25, 1835-37.
This Op.25 collection bears a dedication to Liszt’s mistress, Countess Marie d’Agoult, a writer who used the pseudonym Daniel Stern (the Op.10 Études are dedicated to Franz Liszt). One reason Chopin attempted to capture Liszt’s sympathies with the dedications had to do with the performance design of the pieces in the two sets: each was written to highlight some facet of pianism.
28:57 Nº 1 in A flat major. Allegro sostenuto (Aeolian Harp – Shepherd Boy)
31:21 Nº 2 in F minor. Presto (Balm)
33:05 Nº 3 in F major. Allegro (Carwheel)
35:08 Nº 4 in A minor. Agitato
37:28 Nº 5 in E minor. Vivace
40:52 Nº 6 in G sharp minor. Allegro (Thirds)
43:00 Nº 7 in C sharp minor. Lento (Cello)
48:21 Nº 8 in D flat major. Vivace (Sixths)
49:30 Nº 9 in G flat major. Allegro assai (Butterfly)
50:35 Nº 10 in B minor. Allegro con fuoco
55:04 Nº 11 in A minor. Lento – Allegro con brio (Winter Wind)
58:41 Nº 12 in C minor. Allegro molto con fuoco (Ocean)

III. Trois Nouvelles Études for piano, 1839-40.
Chopin composed this set of etudes for the Méthode des methods, a publication of Ignaz Moscheles, a leading pianist and composer of his day who was not always in agreement with Chopin’s compositional techniques, and François-Joseph Fétis, a now largely forgotten Belgian musicologist.
1:01:26 Nº 1 in F minor
1:03:31 Nº 2 in A flat major
1:05:56 Nº 3 in D flat major

As always with Arrau, the Pianist takes a back seat to Music Making, are a prime example of how myth making regarding Arrau’s Recordings. Arrau approaches Chopin’s Etudes as a genuinely mature musician and sensitive interpreter. In Opus 10, No. 3, for instance, he infuses the music with a deep sadness that recalls its XIX Century title, “La Tristesse.” Incidentally, this record received the Grand Prix du Disque Frédéric Chopin from the Warsaw Chopin Society when it was re-released in 1990.

The 24 Études of Frédéric Chopin (divided into two separate opuses, 10 and 25, but actually composed almost simultaneously) remain the most significant entries in that particular musical genre. Chopin refers, in a letter dating from the fall of 1829, to having written a study “in [his] own manner,” and indeed, a great chasm stands between his achievements and the far drier études of his predecessors (one thinks of Moscheles, Czerny, and Hummel in particular). It was not Chopin’s intent, as it was with many nineteenth-century pianist-composers, to create studies of mere technique and raw dexterity; here, instead, are works with an inexhaustible array of textures, moods, and colors to explore. These are works meant for the concert hall as well as for the practice room

Despite the slightly cramped, airless sonics, Arrau’s characteristically warm and ample sonority makes itself felt in these 1956 recordings. The pianist uncovers layers of depth and disquiet in the slower Études that others merely prettify. The treacherous extensions in the E-Flat Étude, for instance, are distinctly projected and balanced, rather than strummed. Arrau’s spectacularly honest technique enables him to articulate Chopin’s sparkling figurations with a liquid legato unaided by the pedal.

Alan Hovhaness – Appalachian Symphony: make music part of your life series


FROM:  100yearoldWhiskey’s You Tube channel:

Alan Hovhaness – Appalachian Symphony

ALAN HOVHANESS – Symphony No. 60 (“To the Appalachian Mountains“)

In this 2005 recording, Gerard Schwarz conducts the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra. Naxos is the official owner of this recording.

First Movement (0:00)
Photo #1: Sunrise at Canim Lake, by werner22brigitte
http://pixabay.com/en/sunrise-canim-l…
Photo #2: Sea of Fog, by MartinStr
http://pixabay.com/en/hochlantsch-mou…
Photo #3: Sunrise, by Silvicultrix
http://pixabay.com/en/sunrise-morgenr…
Photo #4: Ring, by MartinStr
http://pixabay.com/en/sunrise-mountai…
Photo #5: Sea of Clouds, by DeltaWorks
http://pixabay.com/en/sea-of-clouds-a…
Photo #6: Morning Sun, by kcssm
http://pixabay.com/en/dawn-sunrise-su…

Second Movement (10:42)
Photo #1: Glacier National Park, by dbmcnicol
http://pixabay.com/en/montana-glacier…
Photo #2: Great Salt Lake, by werner22brigitte
http://pixabay.com/en/great-salt-lake…
Photo #3: Nosedive, by Aperture
http://pixabay.com/en/fly-heli-mounta…
Photo #4: New Zealand, by Simon
http://pixabay.com/en/new-zealand-mou…

Third Movement (20:15)
Photo #1: Canton of Uri, by wernj
http://pixabay.com/en/sea-of-fog-wint…
Photo #2: Carinthia Winter, by KleeKarl
http://pixabay.com/en/austria-carinth…

Fourth Movement (23:29)
Photo #1: Säntis, by nitli
http://pixabay.com/en/s%C3%A4ntis-sno…
Photo #2: Clouds, by titigraf
http://pixabay.com/en/sky-clouds-moun…
Photo #3: Mountain Goats, by Steppinstars
http://pixabay.com/en/mountain-goats-…
Photo #4: Chipmunk, by LoggaWiggler
http://pixabay.com/en/chipmunk-cute-n…
Photo #5: Kamloops, by Werner 22brigitte
http://pixabay.com/en/rollig-hills-mo…
Photo #6: Paragliding, by Simon
http://pixabay.com/en/mountains-parag…
Photo #7: Hot Air Balloon, by LoggaWiggler
http://pixabay.com/en/balloon-hot-air…
———————————
If you’re interested in buying the CD/MP3, it is available at ArkivMusic:
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/N…

And at Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Symphony-60-A-H…

The CD/MP3 also includes Hovhaness’s Guitar Concerto No. 1 and Khrimian Hairig.

Carl Maria von Weber, Konzertstück f-moll für Klavier und Orchester, Op.79. Alfred Brendel & LSO (make music part of your life series)


Carl Maria von Weber Konzertstück f-moll für Klavier und Orchester, Op. 79 – Alfred Brendel, London Symphony Orchestra, Claudio Abbado — https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…

make music part of your life series: Gioacchino Rossini – Silken Ladder Overture


[youtube.com/watch?v=fswuE-IBU7E]

Gioacchino Rossini – Silken Ladder Overture

In this 1978 recording, Claudio Abbado conducts the London Symphony Orchestra. RCA is the official owner of this recording.

Photo: http://pixabay.com/en/marian-column-p…

This recording is no longer available on CD, but you can find alternate recordings of this specific overture on ArkivMusic:
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/D…

Fabulous musical moments: Ottorino Respighi Brazilian Impressions (Antal Dorati and The London Symphony Orchestra 1957)


[youtube.com/watch?v=WQ0rqgWloQU]

Ottorino Respighi:  Brazilian Impressions (Antal Dorati/LSO)

Ottorino Respighi Brazilian Impressions
1. Tropical Night
2. Butantan
3. Song and Dance

Antal Dorati and The London Symphony Orchestra

1957

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Ottorino Respighi

Ottorino Respighi (Italian: [ottoˈriːno resˈpiːɡi]; 9 July 1879 – 18 April 1936) was an Italian composer, musicologist and conductor. He is best known for his orchestral music, particularly the three Roman tone poems: Fountains of Rome (Fontane di Roma), Pines of Rome (I pini di Roma), and Roman Festivals (Feste romane). His musicological interest in 16th-, 17th- and 18th-century music led him to compose pieces based on the music of these periods. He also wrote a number of operas, the most famous of which is La fiamma.

Biography

Ottorino Respighi was born in Bologna, Italy. He was taught piano and violin by his father, who was a local piano teacher. He went on to study violin and viola with Federico Sarti at the Liceo Musicale in Bologna, composition with Giuseppe Martucci, and historical studies with Luigi Torchi, a scholar of early music. A year after receiving his diploma in violin in 1899, Respighi went to Russia to be principal violist in the orchestra of the Russian Imperial Theatre in St Petersburg during its season of Italian opera. While there he studied composition for five months with Rimsky-Korsakov.

He then returned to Bologna, where he earned a second diploma in composition. Until 1908 his principal activity was as first violin in the Mugellini Quintet. In 1908-09 he spent some time performing in Germany before returning to Italy and turning his attention entirely to composition. Many sources indicate that while he was in Germany, he studied briefly with Max Bruch, but in her biography of the composer, Respighi’s wife asserts that this is not the case.[1]

During the second decade of the twentieth century, Respighi was active as a performer and composer. His compositions began to draw attention, and in 1913 he was appointed as teacher of composition at the Conservatorio di Santa Cecilia in Rome, where he lived for the rest of his life. In 1917 his international fame began to spread through multiple performances of the first of his Roman orchestral tone poems, Fountains of Rome. In 1919 he married a former pupil, the singer Elsa Olivieri-Sangiacomo. From 1923 to 1926 he was director of the Conservatorio. In 1925 he collaborated with Sebastiano Arturo Luciani on an elementary textbook entitled Orpheus. He was elected to the Royal Academy of Italy in 1932.

A visit to Brazil resulted in the composition Impressioni brasiliane (Brazilian Impressions). He had intended to write a sequence of five pieces, but by 1928 he had completed only three, and decided to present what he had. Its first performance was in 1928 in Rio de Janeiro. The first piece, “Tropical Night”, is a nocturne with fragments of dance rhythms suggested by the sensuous textures. The second piece is a sinister picture of a snake research institute, Instituto Butantan, that Respighi visited in São Paulo, with hints of birdsong (as in Pines of Rome). The final movement is a vigorous and colorful Brazilian dance.

On the ship back home from Brazil, Respighi met by chance with Italian physicist Enrico Fermi. During their long conversation, Fermi tried to get Respighi to explain music in terms of physics, which Respighi was unable to do. They remained close friends until Respighi’s death in 1936.[2]

Apolitical in nature, Respighi attempted to steer a neutral course after Benito Mussolini came to power in 1922. His established international fame allowed him some level of freedom but at the same time encouraged the regime to exploit his music for political purposes. Respighi vouched for more outspoken critics such as Arturo Toscanini, allowing them to continue to work under the regime.[3]

Feste Romane, the third of his Roman tone poems, was premiered by Toscanini and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra in 1929; Toscanini recorded the music twice for RCA Victor, first with the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1942 and then with the NBC Symphony Orchestra in 1949. Respighi’s music had considerable success in the USA: the Toccata for piano and orchestra was premiered (with Respighi as soloist) under Willem Mengelberg with the New York Philharmonic Orchestra at Carnegie Hall in November 1928, and the large-scale theme and variations entitled Metamorphoseon was a commission for the fiftieth anniversary of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Respighi was an enthusiastic scholar of Italian music of the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. He published editions of the music of Claudio Monteverdi and Antonio Vivaldi, and of Benedetto Marcello‘s Didone. His work in this area influenced his later compositions and led to a number of works based on early music, such as his three suites of Ancient Airs and Dances. In his Neoclassical works, Respighi generally kept clear of the musical idiom of the classical period, preferring to combine pre-classical melodic styles and musical forms (like dance suites) with typical late-19th-century romantic harmonies and textures.  He continued to compose and tour until January 1936, after which he became increasingly ill. A cardiac infection led to his death by heart failure on 18 April that year at the age of 56. A year after his burial, his remains were moved to his birthplace, Bologna, and reinterred at the city’s expense.

Works

Opera

Ballet

  • La Boutique fantasque (1918), borrows tunes from the 19th century Italian composer Rossini. Premiered in London on 5 June 1919.

  • Sèvres de la vieille France (1920), transcription of 17th-18th century French music

  • La Pentola magica (1920), based on popular Russian themes

  • Scherzo Veneziano (Le astuzie di Columbina) (1920)

  • Belkis, Regina di Saba (1931)

Orchestral

  • Preludio, corale e fuga (1901)

  • Aria per archi (1901)[5]

  • Leggenda for Violin and Orchestra P 36 (1902)[6]

  • Piano Concerto in A minor (1902)

  • Suite per archi (1902)[7]

  • Humoreske for Violin and Orchestra P 45 (1903)[8]

  • Concerto in la maggiore, for Violin and Orchestra (1903), completed by Salvatore Di Vittorio (2009)[9]

  • Fantasia Slava (1903)

  • Suite in E major (Sinfonia) (1903)

  • Serenata per piccola orchestra (1904)[10]

  • Suite in Sol Maggiore (1905), for organ and strings[11]

  • Ouverture Burlesca (1906)

  • Concerto all’antica for Violin and Orchestra (1908)

  • Ouverture Carnevalesca (1913)

  • Tre Liriche (1913), for mezzo-soprano and orchestra (Notte, Nebbie, Pioggia)[12]

  • Sinfonia Drammatica (1914)

  • Fountains of Rome (1916)

  • Ancient Airs and Dances Suite No. 1 (1917), based on Renaissance lute pieces by Simone Molinaro, Vincenzo Galilei (father of Galileo Galilei), and additional anonymous composers.

  • Ballata delle Gnomidi (Dance of the Gnomes) (1920), based on a poem by Claudio Clausetti

  • Adagio con variazioni (1921), for Cello and Orchestra

  • Concerto Gregoriano for Violin and Orchestra (1921)

  • Ancient Airs and Dances Suite No. 2 (1923), based on pieces for lute, archlute, and viol by Fabritio Caroso, Jean-Baptiste Besard, Bernardo Gianoncelli, and an anonymous composer. It also interpolates an aria attributed to Marin Mersenne.

  • Pines of Rome (1924)

  • Concerto in modo misolidio (Concerto in the Mixolydian mode) (1925)

  • Poema autunnale (Autumn Poem), for Violin and Orchestra (1925)

  • Rossiniana (1925), free transcriptions from Rossini‘s Quelques riens (from Péchés de vieillesse)

  • Vetrate di chiesa (Church Windows) (1926), four movements of which three are based on Tre Preludi sopra melodie gregoriane for piano (1919)

  • Trittico Botticelliano (1927), three movements inspired by Botticelli paintings in the Uffizi Gallery, Florence: La Primavera, L’Adorazione dei Magi, La nascita di Venere; the middle movement uses the well-known tune Veni Emmanuel (O Come, O Come, Emmanuel)

  • Impressioni brasiliane (Brazilian Impressions) (1928)

  • The Birds (1928), based on Baroque pieces imitating birds. It comprises Introduzione (Bernardo Pasquini), La Colomba (Jacques de Callot), La Gallina (Jean-Philippe Rameau), L’Usignolo (anonymous English composer of the seventeenth century) and Il Cucu (Pasquini)

  • Toccata for Piano and Orchestra (1928)

  • Roman Festivals (1928)

  • Metamorphoseon (1930)

  • Ancient Airs and Dances Suite No. 3 (1932), arranged for strings only and somewhat melancholy in overall mood. It is based on lute songs by Besard, a piece for baroque guitar by Ludovico Roncalli, lute pieces by Santino Garsi da Parma and additional anonymous composers.

  • Concerto a cinque (Concerto for Five) (1933), for Oboe, Trumpet, Piano, Viola d’amore, Double-bass, and Strings

Vocal/choral

  • Nebbie (1906), voice and piano

  • Stornellatrice (1906), voice and piano

  • Cinque canti all’antica (1906), voice and piano

  • Il Lamento di Arianna (1908), for mezzo-soprano and orchestra[13]

  • Aretusa (text by Shelley) (1911), cantata for mezzo-soprano and orchestra

  • Tre Liriche (1913), for mezzo-soprano and orchestra (Notte, Nebbie, Pioggia)[14]

  • La Sensitiva (The Sensitive Plant, text by Shelley) (1914), for mezzo-soprano and orchestra

  • Il Tramonto (The sunset, text by Shelley) (1914), for mezzo-soprano and string quartet (or string orchestra)

  • Cinque liriche (1917), voice and piano

  • Quattro liriche (Gabriele d’Annunzio) (1920), voice and piano

  • La Primavera (The Spring, texts by Constant Zarian) (1922) lyric poem for soli, chorus and orchestra

  • Deità silvane (Woodland Deities, texts by Antonio Rubino) (1925), song-cycle for soprano and small orchestra

  • Lauda per la Natività del Signore (Laud to the Nativity, text attributed to Jacopone da Todi) (1930), a cantata for three soloists (soprano, mezzo-soprano, tenor), mixed chorus (including substantial sections for 8-part mixed and TTBB male chorus), and chamber ensemble (woodwinds and piano 4-hands)

Chamber

  • String Quartet in D major in one movement (undated)

  • String Quartet No. 1 in D major (1892–98)

  • String Quartet No. 2 in B flat major (1898)

  • String Quartet in D major (1907)

  • String Quartet in D minor (1909) subtitled by composer “Ernst ist das Leben, heiter ist die Kunst”

  • Quartetto Dorico or Doric String Quartet (1924)

  • Tre Preludi sopra melodie gregoriane, for piano (1921)

  • Violin Sonata in B minor (1917)

  • Piano Sonata in F minor

  • Variazioni, for guitar

  • Double Quartet in D minor (1901)

  • Piano Quintet in F minor (1902)

  • Six Pieces for Violin and Piano (1901–06)

  • Quartet in D major for 4 Viols (1906)

  • Huntingtower: Ballad for Band (1932)

  • String Quintet for 2 Violins, 1 Viola & 2 Violoncellos in G minor (1901, incomplete)

Continue reading

great compositions/performances: Edward Elgar – Salut d’amour Op 12 Ion Marin conduction the Berliner Philharmoniker


[youtube.com/watch?v=tYrj9jgxC8c]

Edward Elgar: Salut d’amour Op 12

Uploaded on Jul 3, 2011/94,152 views

Berliner Philharmoniker – Edward Elgar Salut d’amour op. 12 2010

von der Berliner Waldbühne, Dirigent Ion Marin

view more beautiful videos at fritz51117

great compositions/performancesTchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra


[youtube.com/watch?v=ZxOtYNf-eWE]

Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra

Published by  Adagietto on Jan 13, 2013/ 108,521 views

From Adagietto:
Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, fantasy-overture for orchestra in B minor, 1880. Maestro Valery Gergiev with the London Symphony Orchestra.

Numerous composers have responded to Shakespeare’s timeless drama of forbidden and youthful love, but Tchaikovsky’s response (along with Berlioz’s and Prokofiev’s) is at the top of the list. It is the only one of the three to be intended as a number in a symphony concert, and, hence is by default the most famous of the lot.

Tchaikovsky, a lawyer, was still developing as a composer at age 29 when Mily Balakirev (self-appointed father figure to Russian composers) persuaded him to write an orchestral work on the subject of the “star-cross’d lovers.” Balakirev outlined the form, planned the keys, and even suggested some of the actual music. After the 1870 premiere, he convinced Tchaikovsky to revise it. The work’s success in this form did much to transform the composer’s tendency toward crippling doubt into useful self-criticism. (Not that the transformation was ever total; Tchaikovsky suffered bouts of depression and self-doubt throughout his career.) The composer revised it again in 1880; this version is almost universally the one played. While the final version is probably the best one, the 1869 text is also a fine work and very much worth hearing. The earlier version begins with a charming tune that carries elements of the great love theme. In the first and second revisions Tchaikovsky eliminated this and replaced it with the benedictory theme representing Friar Laurence. The effect of this change on the overture’s structure is large. The first version seems to begin with Juliet still in a relatively childlike state, but with the potential for the great love present in the disguised premonitions of the love theme. The focus is, therefore, on the development of the drama as it unfolds. The later versions, beginning as it were with a prayer, seem to invite the hearer to look back on a tragedy that has already happened. Both versions proceed identically through depictions of the clashes between the houses of Montague and Capulet, and then unveil the great love music. After that, though, Tchaikovsky’s original idea seems to this writer to be superior: There is a great development, fugal-sounding and allowing for contrapuntal conflict based on the overture’s main rhythms and themes. It is tremendously exciting, more so than the music which replaced it. Justification for dropping it might be made along the lines that the original version has too much dramatic weight and overshadows the rest of the music. The main differences thereafter are in details of scoring, and in the finale, which in the original version is much too curt.

It is often instructive to see what a great composer has done at two different times with the same ideas and material. Whether or not it has greater musical merit, Tchaikovsky’s blessing of his final version served to ensure that it is the one that prevailed, and in that form it is accepted as one of the greatest programmatic pieces in the symphonic repertoire. The yearning love theme, in particular, is universally acknowledged as one of the greatest melodies ever written, while the exciting fight music and Tchaikovsky’s unfailingly clear and imaginative orchestration carry the listener through with hardly a misstep. But the original version is not far behind it in musical worth; it should be given more frequent revivals, if only for the sake of hearing the great fugato passage described above.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Romeo und Julia, Romeo y Julieta, Roméo et Juliette, Romeo e Giulietta, Romeo en Julia, Romeu e Julieta, Romeo and Juliet, Romeu i Julieta, Romeo a Juliet, Romeo og Julie, Romeo kaj Julieta, Romeo i Julija, Romeo e Xulieta, Romeo dan Julia, Rómeó és Júlia, Romeo și Julieta, Romeowan Juliet, Romeo dhe Xhuljeta, Romeo ja Julia, Romeo och Julia, Romeo at Julieta, Romeo un Džuljeta

Visit  this site for many more wonderful unique musical moments! I suscribed to this channel  Adagietto

make music part of your life series: Serenata Española de Joaquim Malats Pepe Romero


[youtube.com/watch?v=we2csh9eaIc]

Serenata Española de Joaquim Malats Pepe Romero

read more about Joaquin Malats: Serenata Española @ takis konstantopoulos: for the promotion of rigour and rationality on BLOGGER! Check it out!

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pepe Romero (born March 8, 1944 in Málaga, Spain) is a world-renowned classical and flamenco guitarist. He is particularly famous for his outstanding technique and colorful musical interpretations on the instrument.

Pepe Romero
Pepe Romero 2000.JPG

Pepe Romero in 2000
Background information
Born March 8, 1944 (age 70)
Málaga, Spain
Genres Classical music, flamenco
Occupations Guitarist, arranger
Instruments Guitar
Years active fl. ca. 1959 – present
Labels Philips Records
Associated acts The Romero Guitar Quartet
Website www.peperomero.com
Notable instruments
Torres 1856

Biography

As a soloist Pepe Romero has appeared in the United States, Canada, Europe, China, and many countries around the world with the Toronto, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago, Houston, Pittsburgh, Boston, San Francisco and Dallas Symphony Orchestras, as well as with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the New York, Bogota and Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestras, the Boston Pops Orchestra, the Hong Kong Sinfonietta and the London Symphony Orchestra, the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, the Monte Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra, I Musici, the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, Philharmonia Hungarica, the Hungarian State Orchestra, the Spanish National Orchestra, the Spanish National Radio/Television Orchestra, L’Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, The New Moscow Chamber Orchestra, the Springfiled Orchestra, the Lausanne Chamber Orchestra, the American Sinfonietta and the Bournemouth Symphony. He has been a special guest at the festivals of Salzburg, Israel, Schleswig-Holstein, Menuhin, Osaka, Granada, Istanbul, Ravinia, Garden State, Hollywood Bowl, Blossom, Wolf Trap, Saratoga and Hong Kong.

Since his first recording (at the age of 15) he has recorded over 50 solo albums and 30 albums as part of the famed guitar quartet The Romeros. He has played for Presidents Carter and Nixon, the Queen of the Netherlands, the Prince of Wales and Pope John Paul II. He has numerous international recording awards to his credit and has received an Honorary Doctorate in Music from University of Victoria.

His contributions to the field of classical guitar have inspired a number of distinguished composers to write works specifically for him, including Joaquín Rodrigo, Federico Moreno Torroba, Rev. Francisco de Madina, Lorenzo Palomo, Michael Zearott, Enrique Diemecke, and Celedonio Romero.

Pepe Romero is the second son of Celedonio Romero, who was his only guitar teacher. His first professional appearance was in a shared concert with his father when Pepe was only seven years old. In 1957 Celedonio Romero left Franco‘s Spain for the United States with his family.

On February 11, 2000, King Juan Carlos I of Spain knighted Pepe Romero and his brothers, Celin and Ángel, into the Order of “Isabel la Catolica.” The official ceremony of this high honor took place at the USC Thornton School of Music, and included a gala performance by The Romeros with the Thornton Chamber Orchestra. He is currently Adjunct Professor of Classical Guitar at the Thornton School, where he was named “Distinguished Artist in Residence” in 2004.[1][2]

Although originally a classical guitarist, he is talented in Flamenco and a popular Flamenco performer. His most famous Flamenco-only album is called ¡Flamenco Fenómeno!

The Romero Guitar Quartet

The Romero Guitar Quartet

Fabulous performances: Valentina Lisitsa Plays Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto #2 in c Op.18


[youtube.com/watch?v=uBpyjUd_8Qk]

Valentina Lisitsa – Rachmaninoff – Piano Concerto Nº 3 in D Minor, Op.30 (Part 1 of 5)

 Orquesta de la Ciudad de los Reyes
Director: Pablo Sabat
 
Auditorio del Colegio Santa Ursula
Lima – Peru, 10 Diciembre 2009

Prokofiev – Romeo & Juliet – Leningrad / Mravinsky


[youtube.com/watch?v=DXyv4SZmKyY]

Prokofiev – Romeo & Juliet – Leningrad / Mravinsky

Prokofiev - Romeo and Juliet

Prokofiev – Romeo and Juliet

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Prokofiev – Romeo And Juliet – Juliet As A Young Girl


[youtube.com/watch?v=9ITSmOC2dS8]

Prokofiev – Romeo And Juliet – Juliet As A Young Girl

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series – Enjoy: Spanish Guitar – Tárrega, Albéniz, Rodrigo


[youtube.com/watch?v=HbkdVpE-VEo]

Spanish Guitar: Tárrega, Albéniz, Rodrigo

The Strings of Time
resound brightly today,
as they’re trying to say,
listen to Me, Soul of Mine.

Part 1 (Guitar Solo)
(00:00) 01. Capricho Arabe (Serenata, Tárrega) [Wulfin Lieske, guitar]
(05:09) 02. Lágrima (Prelude, Tárrega)
(06:46) 03. Maria (Gavotte, Tárrega)
(08:18) 04. Mazurka in G (Tárrega)
(10:04) 05. Recuerdos de Viaje Op.71, I En el Mar (Barcarola, Albéniz) [Julian Byzantine, guitar]
(15:45) 06. Recuerdos de Viaje Op.71, II Asturias (Leyenda, Albéniz)
(22:50) 07. Recuerdos de Viaje Op.71, V Puerta de Tierra (Bolero, Albéniz)
(26:23) 08. Andaluza (Danza Española No. 5, Granados) [Eliot Fisk, guitar]
(30:59) 09. Cancon del Lladre (Llobet) [Wulfin Lieske, guitar]
(32:31) 10. Romance (Anon, arr. Yepes) [Pierre Laniau, guitar]

Part 2 (Guitar and Orchestra)
(35:03) 11. Concierto Madrigal, I Fanfarre (Allegro Marziale, Rodrigo) [Alfonso Moreno & Deborah Mariotti, guitars – London Symphony Orchestra, Enrique Batiz]
(37:03) 12. Concierto Madrigal, II Pastoral (Allegretto, Rodrigo)
(40:44) 13. Concierto Andaluz, I Tiempo de Bolero (Allegro Vivace, Rodrigo) [Alfonso Moreno, Minerva Garibay, Cecilia Lopez & Jesus Ruiz, guitars – Mexican State Symphony Orchestra, Enrique Batiz]
(49:21) 14. Fantasia para un Gentilhombre, IV Canario (Rodrigo) [Ernesto Bitetti, guitar – Philharmonia Orchestra, Antoni Ros-Marba]

Music Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for non-profit purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Enhanced by Zemanta

GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Schubert Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major


[youtube.com/watch?v=8YFX-XQLToE]
Schubert Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Valentina Lisitsa
Valentina Lisitsa beside a piano
Background information
Born 1973
KievUkrainian SSRSoviet Union
Genres Classical
Occupations Classical pianist
Instruments Piano
Website www.valentinalisitsa.com

Valentina Lisitsa (UkrainianВалентина Лисиця, translit. Valentyna Lysytsya) is a Ukrainian-born and trainedclassical pianist who resides in North Carolina.[1][2] Lisitsa is among the most frequently viewed pianists on YouTube and is often praised as a highly commendable pianist.[3][4] Lisitsa followed a unique path to success, independently launching the beginnings of her career via social media, without initially signing to a tour promoteror record company.[3][4]

Biography[edit]

Lisitsa was born in KievUkraine, in 1973. She started playing the piano at the age of three, performing her first solo recital at the age of four.[5]

Despite her early disposition to music, her dream at that point was to become a professional chess player.[6]Lisitsa attended the Lysenko music school for Gifted Children and, later, Kiev Conservatory,[7] where she and her future husband, Alexei Kuznetsoff, studied under Dr. Ludmilla Tsvierko.[8] It was when Lisitsa met Kuznetsoff that she began to take music more seriously.[9] In 1991, they won the first prize in The Murray Dranoff Two Piano Competition in Miami, Florida.[7][10] That same year, they moved to the United States to further their careers as concert pianists.[3] In 1992 the couple married.[3] Their New York debut was at the Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center in 1995.[8]

After the death of her manager, and with the thought that she was “just another blonde Russian pianist”[11] Lisitsa almost gave up on her career as a concert pianist, and contemplated becoming a local worker for the government in Washington, D.C., but changed her mind at the last minute influenced by one of her new fans in England. Lisitsa posted her first YouTube video in 2007, gaining even more online attention after uploading her own set of Chopin etudes online for free (in response to an illegal upload of the same set beforehand). Her set of Chopin etudes reached the number one slot on Amazon’s classical video recordings, and became the most-viewed online set of Chopin etudes on YouTube.[3]

Furthering her career, Lisitsa and her husband put their life savings in recording a CD of Rachmaninov concertos with the London Symphony Orchestra in 2010.[3] In the spring of 2012, before her Royal Albert Hall debut, Lisitsa was signed on to Decca Records, who later released her Rachmaninov CD set.[3] By mid-2012 she had nearly 50 million views on her YouTube videos.[4]

Lisitsa has performed in various venues around the world, including Carnegie HallAvery Fisher HallBenaroya HallMusikverein and Royal Albert Hall. She is well known for her online recitals and practicing streams. She has also collaborated with violinist Hilary Hahn for various recital engagements.[7]

Discography

Lisitsa has recorded six CDs for Audiofon Records, including three solo CDs and two discs of duets with her husband Alexei Kuznetsoff; a Gold CD for CiscoMusic label with cellist DeRosa; a duet recital on VAI label with violinist Ida Haendel; and DVDs of Frédéric Chopin’s 24 EtudesSchubertLiszt Schwanengesang.[12]

Her recording of the 4 sonatas for violin and piano by composer Charles Ives, made with Hahn, was released in October 2011 on Deutsche Grammophone label. Her album “Valentina Lisitsa Live at the Royal Albert Hall” (based on her debut performance at that venue 19 June 2012) was released 2 July 2012.

Lisitsa has recently recorded several projects from the composers Rachmaninoff, Liszt, Chopin, and Beethoven. Her complete album of Rachmaninoff concertos was released in October 2012 by Decca Records.[13] The most recent album of Liszt works was released in October 2013 on Decca label in 2 formats – CD and 12″ LP which was cut unedited from analog tape.

External links

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Rachmaninoff’s Variation 18 Rhapsody on Themes of Paganini Valentina Lisitsa


[youtube.com/watch?v=yTyiwtfpO8s]
Live footage from the recording session. London Symphony Orchestra , Michael Francis conducting. The recording is available now on Decca. Get yours today! 🙂
iTunes: http://smarturl.it/paganinirhapsody
Amazon: http://smarturl.it/LisitsaPaganini

Enhanced by Zemanta

Rachmaninoff Variation 18 Rhapsody on Themes of Paganini Valentina Lisitsa


Live footage from the recording session. London Symphony Orchestra , Michael Francis conducting. The recording is available now on Decca. Get yours today! 🙂
iTuneshttp://smarturl.it/paganinirhapsody
Amazon: http://smarturl.it/LisitsaPaganini

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life series: Schumann – Symphony No. 2 in C Op.61 – Leonard Bernstein (live recording)



Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856) – Symphony n°2 in C major opus 61

I. Sostenuto assai (00:00) – Allegro ma non troppo (03:41)
II. Scherzo. Allegro vivace (12:26)
III. Adagio espressivo (19:20)
IV. Allegro molto vivace (32:46)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks), dir Leonard Bernstein
(live recording 1983)
Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta