Tag Archives: Leonard Bernstein

historic musical bits: Franz Schubert Symphony No.8 “Unfinished” D 759, Leonard Bernstein


Franz Schubert Symphony No.8 “Unfinished” D 759, Leonard Bernstein

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historic musical bits: Franz Schubert Symphony No.5 in B flat major D 485, Leonard Bernstein


Franz Schubert Symphony No.5 in B flat major D 485, Leonard Bernstein

historic musical bits: Beethoven Symphony No 7, A major, Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philarmoniker


Beethoven Symphony No 7 A major Leonard Bernstein Wiener Philarmoniker

historic musical bits: Franz Schubert Symphony No.8 “Unfinished” D 759, Leonard Bernstein


Franz Schubert Symphony No.8 “Unfinished” D 759, Leonard Bernstein

Historic musical bits: Beethoven Symphony No 3 E flat major Eroica Leonard Bernstein


Beethoven Symphony No 3 E flat major Eroica Leonard Bernstein Wiener Philarmoniker

historic musical bits: Ludwig van Beethoven Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67 – Leonard Bernstein


Ludwig van Beethoven Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67 – Leonard Bernstein

movements:

  • First movement: Allegro con brio
  • Second movement: Andante con moto
  • Third movement: Scherzo. Allegro
  • Fourth movement: Allegro

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

Historic Musical Bits: Wilhelm Kempff plays Robert Schumann – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54 (Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischem Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik)


Robert Schumann – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54

Wilhelm Kempff, piano
Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischem Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik

Movements:

Allegro affettuoso (A minor) 00:00:00
Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (F major) 00:15:43
Allegro vivace (A major) 00:21:27
*****************************************************************
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54, is a Romantic concerto by Robert Schumann, completed in 1845. The work premiered in Leipzig on 1 January 1846 with Clara Schumann playing the solo part. Ferdinand Hiller, the work’s dedicatee, conducted.

History

Schumann had earlier worked on several piano concerti: he began one in E-flat major in 1828, from 1829–31 he worked on one in F major, and in 1839, he wrote one movement of a concerto in D minor. None of these works were completed.

In 1841, Schumann wrote a fantasy for piano and orchestra, his Phantasie. His pianist wife Clara urged him to expand this piece into a full piano concerto. In 1845 he added the intermezzo and finale to complete the work. It was the only piano concerto that Schumann completed.

The work may have been used as a model by Edvard Grieg in composing his own Piano Concerto, also in A minor. Grieg’s concerto, like Schumann’s, employs a single powerful orchestral chord at its introduction before the piano’s entrance with a similar descending flourish. Rachmaninov also used the work as a model for his first Piano Concerto.

After this concerto, Schumann wrote two other pieces for piano and orchestra: the Introduction and Allegro Appassionato in G major (Op. 92), and the Introduction and Allegro Concertante in D minor (Op. 134).

Instrumentation

The concerto is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani, strings, and solo piano.

Structure

The piece, as marked in the score, is in three movements:

  1. Allegro affettuoso (A minor)

  2. Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (F major)

  3. Allegro vivace (A major)

There is no break between these last two movements (attacca subito).

Schumann preferred that the movements be listed in concert programs as only two movements:[citation needed]

  1. Allegro affettuoso
  2. Andantino and Rondo

The three movement listing is the more common form used.

Allegro affettuoso

The piece starts with an energetic strike by strings and timpani, followed by a fierce, descending attack by the piano. The first theme is introduced by the oboe along with wind instruments. The theme is then given to the soloist. Schumann provides great variety with this theme. He first offers it in the A minor key of the piece, then we hear it again in major, and we can also hear small snatches of the tune in a very slow, A flat section. The clarinet is often used against the piano in this movement. Toward the end of the movement, the piano launches into a long cadenza before the orchestra joins in with one more melody and builds for the exciting finish.

Intermezzo

This movement is keyed in F major. The piano and strings open up the piece with a small, delicate tune, which is heard throughout the movement before the cellos and later the other strings finally take the main theme, with the piano mainly used as accompaniment. The movement closes with small glimpses of the first movement’s theme before moving straight into the third movement.

Allegro vivace

The movement opens with a huge run up the strings while the piano takes the main, A major theme. Schumann shows great color and variety in this movement. The tune is regal, and the strings are noble. Though it is in 3/4 timing, Schumann manipulates it so that the time signature is often ambiguous. The piece finishes with a restating of the previous material before finally launching into an exciting finale, and ending with a long timpani roll and a huge chord from the orchestra.

Further reading

 

Best classical music, Leonard Bernstein, Brahms Tragic Overture Op.81, great compositions/performances


 

Leonard Bernstein, Brahms Tragic Overture Op.81

 

“Gaudeamus” , Best Classical Music, Bernstein – Academic Festival Overture (Brahms), great compositions/performances


Bernstein – Academic Festival Overture (Brahms)

great compositions/performances, Robert Schumann , Symphony No 1 in B flat major, Op 38, Frühlingssinfonie Spring, Bernstein


Robert Schumann Symphony No 1 in B flat major, Op 38 Frühlingssinfonie Spring Bernstein

Historic Musical Bits: Schumann – Symphony No 2 in C major, Op 61 – Bernstein , great compositions/performances


Schumann – Symphony No 2 in C major, Op 61 – Bernstein


Robert Schumann Symphony No 3 “Rhenish” in E flat major, Op 97 Bernstein

Bernstein, L. – Symphonic Suite from ‘On the Waterfront’ ,great compositions/performances


Bernstein, L. – Symphonic Suite from ‘On the Waterfront’

Gioachino Rossini : La scala di seta (The Silken Ladder), Overture (N.Y. Philharmonic Leonard Bernstein Conducting


Gioachino Rossini : La scala di seta (The Silken Ladder), Overture

Leonard Bernstein – Maria (from West Side Story) , great compositions/performances


English: Leonard Bernstein, conductor and musi...

English: Leonard Bernstein, conductor and musical director of New York City Symphony Español: Leonard Bernstein, director de orquesta y director musical de la New York City Symphony (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

George Gershwin – An American in Paris, (performed in 1959 by the New York Philharmonic, conducted by Leonard Bernstein.), great compositions/performances


George Gershwin – An American in Paris

Jacqueline du Pré plays Schumann – Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 129|NY Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein, conducting: great compositions/performances


Jacqueline du Pré plays Schumann – Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 129 (1/2)

Jacqueline du Pré plays Schumann – Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 129

(2/2)
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Leonard Bernstein – Mozart Schlittenfahrt (Sleigh Ride) 1967: Great compositions/performances


Leonard Bernstein – Mozart Schlittenfahrt (Sleigh Ride) 1967

A Thanksgiving Present for all my friends #euzicasa: Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philharmonic


Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philarmonic

Antonín Dvořák Symphony No 8 [No 4] G major Karajan Wiener Philarmoniker: great compositions/performances


Antonín Dvořák Symphony No 8 [No 4] G major Karajan Wiener Philarmoniker

Sibelius, Symphonie Nr 7 C Dur op 105 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


Sibelius, Symphonie Nr 7 C Dur op 105 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker

Debussy Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune, Leonard Bernstein, Boston Symphony Orchestra: great compsitions/performances


MUSSORGSKY (arr. Stokowski) Night on Bald Mountain: great compositions/performances


MUSSORGSKY (arr. Stokowski) Night on Bald Mountain

Here is Leopold Stokowski‘s (1882-1977) transcription of Modest Mussorgsky‘s “Night on Bald Mountain”. This is the version most famously featured as the ending sequence of the Disney film “Fantasia” (1948), and that most famously caused quite an uproar among movie-goers due to the demonic imagery used in the aforementioned clip.

Stokowski was a prodigy along the lines of Maazel, entering into the Royal Academy of Music to study composition and conducting at the age of merely 13. During his long span as one of the most prominent and important conductors (not to mention one of the greatest) he was actually a very controversial figure. What many people probably don’t know is that Stokowski was a great champion of contemporary music, giving the U.S. and/or world premieres of works by Elgar, Vaughn Williams, Prokofiev, Schoenberg, Hovhaness, Copland, Barber, Berg, Feldman and other contemporary composers. He is also very important to the history of modern concert practice as well, popularizing the batonless technique of conducting, as well as inventing and popularizing the “pops concert” and the modern chairing of a symphony orchestra. He was able to produce what was then referred to as “the Stokowski Sound”, although what is now called “the Philly Sound” (one of the many, illustrious orchestras he was resident conductor for), and was the greatest influence on many conductors proceeding him, particularly Leonard Bernstein. His transcriptions and editing of works were considered uncoif at the time, a practice that had long since become outdated as printed music became more available, but they are now one of the things he is best-known for, particularly this and his orchestration of Bach’s Toccata en Fugue in D Minor BWV 565.

Performed here in 1966 by the London Symphony Orchestra.

George Gershwin – I got rhythm: variations for piano and orchestra: make music part of your life series


George Gershwin – I got rhythm: variations for piano and orchestra

Wayne Marshall – Aalborg Symphony

Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

(September 8, 1988, Luzern)

Itzhak Perlman “Rèverie et caprice” Berlioz: Great compositions/performances


 FROM:

Itzhak Perlman “Rèverie et caprice” Berlioz

Rèverie et caprice op 8 for violin and orchestra
by Hector Berlioz
Itzhak Perlman, violin
Orchestre de Paris
Daniel Barenboim, conductor

Gustav Mahler – Symphony Nº 5. IV Adagietto | Vienna Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein (4/5) (from Adagietto’s You Tube Channel): make music part of your life series


Gustav Mahler – Symphony Nº 5. IV Adagietto | Vienna Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein (4/5) (from Adagietto’s You Tube Channel)

Gustav Mahler – Symphony Nº 5 in C sharp minor, 1901-02.
Wiener Philharmoniker, Vienna Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein.
[HD] Adagietto http://youtu.be/15WQNKhaCHY

Movements:
I Trauermarsch. In gemessenem Schritt. Streng. Wie ein Kondukt. http://youtu.be/tPpm323M_Ik
II Stürmisch bewegt, mit größter Vehemenz http://youtu.be/JwxrTsSQf0Y
III Scherzo. Kräftig, nicht zu schnell http://youtu.be/SKPlH6L5zeE
IV Adagietto. Sehr langsam. http://youtu.be/yjz2TvC2TT4
V Rondo-Finale. Allegro – Allegro giocoso. Frisch http://youtu.be/U5573xP6JkU

Complete Playlist http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPpm32…

“In the Fourth movement, the famous Adagietto, harp and strings alone play. The opening melody recalls two of Mahler’s songs, “Nun seh’ ich wohl” (from Kindertotenlieder) and the separate Ruckert setting “Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen”. The long upbeats and expressive appoggiaturas of the melodic lines give the music a yearning, almost heart-breaking quality. The intensity that builds up inthis movement finaly assuages the darkness and doubts of the earlier movements, making the lighter mood and extrovert energy of the Rondo-Finale acceptable. Together, these two movements form the third part of the symphony. The formal function of the Adagietto is ambiguous. It acts as an introduction to the last movement, which follows without a break, and is thematically bound to it, for twice in the Finale we hear the Adagietto’s main theme, now at a fast tempo. The Adagietto also functions as a slow interlude in F major, between two faster movements in D major; but is also has an expressive weight sufficient for it to stand on its own – indeed, it is often performed by itself.

Even without a text or programme, the music’s emotional and referential content implies an existential dimension. Without an explicit programme or titles, we have few clues to the “meaning” of the Fifth Symphony other than the music itself. Mahler offers some guidance by grouping the five movements, which share some thematic Material, as well as an obsession with death, from the first part; the central scherzo stands alone as the second part; and the lat two movements, which are also linked thematically, form the third.

An essential aspect of Mahler’s symphonies is the idea of emotional and spiritual progression, through various alternatives to a (provisional) conclusion. One important means he uses to articulate this spiritual journey is the technique of progressive tonality. In other symphonies he begins and ends movements in diferent keys, but in the Fifth each movement begins and ends in the same key; however as a whole, it moves from C sharp minor opening movement to the D major of the third and fifth movements.

One reason for Mahler’s significance and influence as a composer is that he viewed his music as a means of seeking and expressing solutions to the problems of his personal, spiritual life. The Depth and seriousness of these problems naturally drew him to the largescale form of the symphony, wich he expanded in length and number of movements to unprecedented proportions.

Mahler kept revising the orchestration of this work until his death. He conducted the first performance with the Gürzenich Orchestra in Cologne on October 18, 1904. He’d begun the Fifth Symphony at Maiernegg in 1901 – writing the third, first and second movements in that order, after a death-obsessed song, “Der Tamboursg’sell,” and the Kindertotenlieder cycle (“on the death of children”). After nearly bleeding to death the previous winter (from an intestinal hemorrhage), Mahler’s symphonic orientation underwent a profound change. Mahler cast his Fifth Symphony in five movements that fall naturally into three parts.

The First begins in C sharp minor with a Funeral March, of measured tread and austere (Movement I). A sonata-form movement follows, marked “Stormily, with greatest vehemence” (Movement II), which shares themes as well as mood with the opening.

The Second Part (which Mahler composed first) is a Scherzo: “Vigorously, not too fast” (Movement III) — the symphony’s shortest large section, but its longest single movement. This emphatically joyous, albeit manic movement puts forward D major as the work’s focal key. Although its form has remained a topic of debate since 1904, rondo and sonata-form elements are both present.

Part Three begins with a seraphic Adagietto: “Very slowly” (Movement IV). This is indubitably related to the Rückert song Mahler composed in August 1901, “Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen” (I have become lost to the world…I live alone in my heaven, in my loving, in my song). A Rondo-Finale: “Allegro giocoso, lively” (Movement V) concludes the symphony, although Mahler devised a form far removed from classic models. While sectional, in truth episodic, this too has elements of sonata form.

Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

September 8, 1988, Luzern

 

 

Aaron Copland. The Red Pony. Dream March and Circus Music. New Philharmonia (make music part of your life series)


Aaron Copland. The Red Pony. Dream March and Circus Music. New Philharmonia

Dream march and circus music from: “The Red Pony” – Suite from the film by the american composer Aaron Copland (1900-1990) performed by the New Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by the composer.

make music part of your life series: Leonard Bernstein – Maria (from West Side Story)


[youtube.com/watch?v=kpF1IZ4xLuE]

Leonard Bernstein – Maria (from West Side Story)

Leonard Bernstein (1918 – 1990) was probably best known to the public as the longtime music director of the New York Philharmonic, for conducting concerts by many of the world’s leading orchestras, and for writing the music for West Side Story, a musical based on William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.

great compositions/performances: Debussy Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune


[youtube.com/watch?v=EvnRC7tSX50]

Debussy Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune

Leonard Bernstein conducts Claude Debussy‘s Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun – extract from “The Unanswered Question“, Boston Symphony Orchestra

Check my channel for more music http://www.youtube.com/user/ofirgal

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Historic musical moments: Brahms – Symphony No. 2 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Leonard Bernstein – 1982


[youtube.com/watch?v=n-qMtWVf0NA]

Brahms – Symphony No. 2Wiener PhilharmonikerLeonard Bernstein – 1982

Johannes Brahms
Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 73

I. Allegro non troppo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (00:42)
II. Adagio non troppo – L’istesso tempo, ma grazioso . . . (21:53)
III. Allegretto grazioso (quasi andantino) . . . . . . . . . . . . (34:41)
IV. Finale. Allegro con spirito . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (40:13)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein

Recorded live at the Große Musikvereinssaal
Vienna, 1-6 September 1982

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: George Gershwin – An American in Paris ( This was performed in 1959 by the New York Philharmonic, conducted by Leonard Bernstein.)


[youtube.com/watch?v=zi0ENw-JlUI]

George GershwinAn American in Paris ( This was performed in 1959 by the New York Philharmonic, conducted by Leonard Bernstein.)

An American in Paris is a symphonic tone poem by the American composer George Gershwin, written in 1928. Inspired by the time Gershwin had spent in Paris, it evokes the sights and energy of the French capital in the 1920s. It is one of Gershwin’s best-known compositions.
Gershwin composed the piece on commission from the New York Philharmonic. He also did the orchestration (he did not orchestrate his musicals). Gershwin scored An American in Paris for the standard instruments of the symphony orchestra plus celesta, saxophones, and automobile horns. Gershwin brought back some Parisian taxi horns for the New York premiere of the composition, which took place on December 13, 1928 in Carnegie Hall, with Walter Damrosch conducting the New York Philharmonic.
Gershwin collaborated on the original program notes with the critic and composer Deems Taylor, noting that: “My purpose here is to portray the impression of an American visitor in Paris as he strolls about the city and listens to various street noises and absorbs the French atmosphere.” When the tone poem moves into the blues, “our American friend … has succumbed to a spasm of homesickness.” But, “nostalgia is not a fatal disease.” The American visitor “once again is an alert spectator of Parisian life” and “the street noises and French atmosphere are triumphant.”

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Great Compositions/Performances: Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker


Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

September 8, 1988, Luzern

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 




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The Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98 by Johannes Brahms is the last of his symphonies. Brahms began working on the piece in Mürzzuschlag. then in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, in 1884, just a year after completing his Symphony No. 3, and completed it in 1885.

Instrumentation

The symphony is scored for two flutes (one doubling on piccolo), two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, contrabassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani, triangle (third movement only), and strings

Reception

The work was given its premiere in Meiningen on October 25, 1885 with Brahms himself conducting. The piece had earlier been given to a small private audience in a version for two pianos, played by Brahms and Ignaz Brüll. Brahms’ friend and biographer Max Kalbeck, reported that the critic Eduard Hanslick, acting as one of the page-turners, exclaimed on hearing the first movement at this performance: “For this whole movement I had the feeling that I was being given a beating by two incredibly intelligent people.”[2] Hanslick later spoke more approvingly of it, however.[citation needed]

Progressive rock group Yes‘ keyboardist Rick Wakeman used part of the symphony on the instrumental “Cans and Brahms” from the 1971 album Fragile

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Leonard Bernstein – Maria (from “West Side Story”)


[youtube.com/watch?v=kpF1IZ4xLuE]

Leonard Bernstein – Maria (from “West Side Story”)

Leonard Bernstein (1918 – 1990) was probably best known to the public as the longtime music director of the New York Philharmonic, for conducting concerts by many of the world’s leading orchestras, and for writing the music for West Side Story, a musical based on William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.

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Great Compositions/Performances: Bernstein – Academic Festival Overture (Brahms)



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Make Music Part of Your Life: Johannes Brahms – Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857)



Johannes Brahms

Work: Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857) for orchestra

Mov.I: Allegro molto 00:00
Mov.II: Scherzo: Allegro non troppo 10:27
Mov.III: Adagio non troppo 17:55
Mov.IV: Menuetto I & II 33:35
Mov.V: Scherzo: Allegro 37:13
Mov.VI: Rondo: Allegro 39:47

Orchestra: Capella Agustina

Conductor: Andreas Spering

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Brahms, Symphony Nr 3 F Dur op 90 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker


Brahms, Symphony Nr 3 F Dur op 90 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90, is a symphony by Johannes Brahms. The work was written in the summer of 1883 at Wiesbaden, nearly six years after he completed his Second Symphony. In the interim Brahms had written some of his greatest works, including the Violin Concerto, two overtures (Tragic Overture and Academic Festival Overture), and the Second Piano Concerto.

The premiere performance was given on 2 December 1883 by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, under the direction of Hans Richter. The shortest of Brahms’ four symphonies, a typical performance lasts between 30 and 40 minutes.

Form

The symphony consists of four movements, marked as follows:

  1. Allegro con brio (F major), in sonata form.
  2. Andante (C major), in a modified sonata form.
  3. Poco allegretto (C minor), in ternary form (A B A’).
  4. Allegro (F minor/F major), in a modified sonata form.

History

Hans Richter, who conducted the premiere of the symphony, proclaimed it to be Brahms’ Eroica. The symphony was well received, more so than his Second Symphony. Although Richard Wagner had died earlier that year, the public feud between Brahms and Wagner had not yet subsided. Wagner enthusiasts tried to interfere with the symphony’s premiere, and the conflict between the two factions nearly brought about a duel.[1]

After each performance, Brahms polished his score further, until it was published in May 1884. His friend and influential music critic Eduard Hanslick said, “Many music lovers will prefer the titanic force of the First Symphony; others, the untroubled charm of the Second, but the Third strikes me as being artistically the most nearly perfect.”[1]

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Make Music Part of Your Life series: Schumann – Symphony No. 2 in C Op.61 – Leonard Bernstein (live recording)



Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856) – Symphony n°2 in C major opus 61

I. Sostenuto assai (00:00) – Allegro ma non troppo (03:41)
II. Scherzo. Allegro vivace (12:26)
III. Adagio espressivo (19:20)
IV. Allegro molto vivace (32:46)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks), dir Leonard Bernstein
(live recording 1983)
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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: The Berlin Celebration Concert – Beethoven, Symphony No 9 Bernstein 1989



Make Music Part of Your Life Series: The Berlin Celebration Concert – Beethoven, Symphony No 9 Bernstein 1989

Published on Mar 30, 2013

Conducted by Leonard Bernstein, THE BERLIN CELEBRATION CONCERT is an historic performance marking the fall of the Berlin Wall. Performed on Christmas Day 1989 in the former East Berlin, the concert unites an international cast of celebrated musicians and vocalists for a moving performance of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony.

Symphonieorchester des Bayerisches Rundfunks and members of Staatskapelle Dresden, Orchestra of the Leningrad Kirov Theatre, London Symphony Orchestra, New York Philharmonic and Orchestre de Paris.

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Leonard Bernstein interprets Maurice Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G


[youtube.com/watch?v=4jYVnNHo3S8]
Great Compositions/Performances: Leonard Bernstein interprets Maurice Ravel‘s Piano Concerto in G

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Rhapsody in Blue – George Gershwin



Rhapsody in Blue, de George Gershwin. Interpretada por el genial Leonard Bernstein, al piano y la dirección.

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Schumann – Symphony n°2 – Leonard Bernstein (live recording)



Published on Mar 6, 2013
Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856) – Symphony n°2 in C major opus 61

I. Sostenuto assai (00:00) – Allegro ma non troppo (03:41)
II. Scherzo. Allegro vivace (12:26)
III. Adagio espressivo (19:20)
IV. Allegro molto vivace (32:46)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks), dir Leonard Bernstein
(live recording 1983)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  

The Symphony in C major by German composer Robert Schumann was published in 1847 as his Symphony No. 2, Op. 61, although it was the third symphony he had completed, counting the B-flat major symphony published as No. 1 in 1841, and the original version of his D minor symphony of 1841 (later revised and published as No. 4).

Schumann began to sketch the symphony on December 12, 1845, and had a robust draft of the entire work by December 28. He spent most of the next year orchestrating, beginning February 12, 1846.[1] His depression and poor health, including ringing in his ears, prevented him finishing the work until October 19. Publication followed in 1847.

The uplifting tone of the symphony is remarkable in the face of Schumann’s health problems—the work can be seen as a Beethovenian triumph over fate/pessimism. It is written in the traditional four-movement form, and as often in the nineteenth century the Scherzo precedes the Adagio. All four movements are in C major, except the first part of the slow movement (in C minor); the work is thus homotonal:

  1. Sostenuto assai — Allegro, ma non troppo
  2. Scherzo: Allegro vivace
  3. Adagio espressivo
  4. Allegro molto vivace
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Great Performances: Brahms, Symphony Nr 3 F Dur op 90 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker


 

Leonard Bernstein – Mozart Schlittenfahrt (Sleigh Ride) 1967



Leonard Bernstein – Mozart Schlittenfahrt (Sleigh Ride) 1967
Leonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra – Mozart Schlittenfahrt (Sleigh Ride) 1967 

Die Schlittenfahrt (Sleigh Ride) is the popular name given to the third of the Three German Dances K. 605 composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

 

Schubert: Rondo el la mayor para violin y cuerdas D 438



Federico Agostini, violin 
Orquesta de Camara Abril. Concierto de Clausura.
0:11
3:43

Great Performances: Beethoven’s “Overture König Stephan” with Leonard Bernstein



Overture König Stephan, op. 117
by Ludwig van Beethoven
Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

Great Performances: Bernstein Beethoven Leonore Overture Nº3



Leonore Overture Nº 3 in C major, Op. 72b

The Amnesty International Concert

Orchestra: Bavarian Broadcast Symphony Orchestra
Venue: Munich, Germany.
Date: 17/10/1976

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 – 1827)
Leonard Bernstein (1918 – 1990)