Tag Archives: Philharmonia Orchestra

historic musical bits: Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan (1953)


Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan (1953)

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great compositions/performances: Rachmaninov – Concerto 1 – Pletnev


Rachmaninov – Concerto 1 – Pletnev

 

Historic Musical Bits: Wilhelm Kempff plays Robert Schumann – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54 (Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischem Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik)


Robert Schumann – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54

Wilhelm Kempff, piano
Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischem Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik

Movements:

Allegro affettuoso (A minor) 00:00:00
Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (F major) 00:15:43
Allegro vivace (A major) 00:21:27
*****************************************************************
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54, is a Romantic concerto by Robert Schumann, completed in 1845. The work premiered in Leipzig on 1 January 1846 with Clara Schumann playing the solo part. Ferdinand Hiller, the work’s dedicatee, conducted.

History

Schumann had earlier worked on several piano concerti: he began one in E-flat major in 1828, from 1829–31 he worked on one in F major, and in 1839, he wrote one movement of a concerto in D minor. None of these works were completed.

In 1841, Schumann wrote a fantasy for piano and orchestra, his Phantasie. His pianist wife Clara urged him to expand this piece into a full piano concerto. In 1845 he added the intermezzo and finale to complete the work. It was the only piano concerto that Schumann completed.

The work may have been used as a model by Edvard Grieg in composing his own Piano Concerto, also in A minor. Grieg’s concerto, like Schumann’s, employs a single powerful orchestral chord at its introduction before the piano’s entrance with a similar descending flourish. Rachmaninov also used the work as a model for his first Piano Concerto.

After this concerto, Schumann wrote two other pieces for piano and orchestra: the Introduction and Allegro Appassionato in G major (Op. 92), and the Introduction and Allegro Concertante in D minor (Op. 134).

Instrumentation

The concerto is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani, strings, and solo piano.

Structure

The piece, as marked in the score, is in three movements:

  1. Allegro affettuoso (A minor)

  2. Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (F major)

  3. Allegro vivace (A major)

There is no break between these last two movements (attacca subito).

Schumann preferred that the movements be listed in concert programs as only two movements:[citation needed]

  1. Allegro affettuoso
  2. Andantino and Rondo

The three movement listing is the more common form used.

Allegro affettuoso

The piece starts with an energetic strike by strings and timpani, followed by a fierce, descending attack by the piano. The first theme is introduced by the oboe along with wind instruments. The theme is then given to the soloist. Schumann provides great variety with this theme. He first offers it in the A minor key of the piece, then we hear it again in major, and we can also hear small snatches of the tune in a very slow, A flat section. The clarinet is often used against the piano in this movement. Toward the end of the movement, the piano launches into a long cadenza before the orchestra joins in with one more melody and builds for the exciting finish.

Intermezzo

This movement is keyed in F major. The piano and strings open up the piece with a small, delicate tune, which is heard throughout the movement before the cellos and later the other strings finally take the main theme, with the piano mainly used as accompaniment. The movement closes with small glimpses of the first movement’s theme before moving straight into the third movement.

Allegro vivace

The movement opens with a huge run up the strings while the piano takes the main, A major theme. Schumann shows great color and variety in this movement. The tune is regal, and the strings are noble. Though it is in 3/4 timing, Schumann manipulates it so that the time signature is often ambiguous. The piece finishes with a restating of the previous material before finally launching into an exciting finale, and ending with a long timpani roll and a huge chord from the orchestra.

Further reading

 

Best Classical Music: Beethoven “Symphony No 8” Karajan (London, 20.V.1955), great compositions/performances


Beethoven “Symphony No 8” Karajan

Giuseppe Verdi – Macbeth – Ballabili (Dances from Act III)


Giuseppe Verdi – Macbeth – Ballabili (Dances from Act III)

Happy Birthday Mozart Week: Piano Concerto No.8 ‘Lützow’ in C major, (KV 246) , great compositions


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto No.8 ‘Lützow’ in C major, (KV 246)

Nathan Milstein – Saint-Saëns – Violin Concerto No 3 in B minor, Op 61 , great compositions/performances


Nathan Milstein – Saint-Saëns – Violin Concerto No 3 in B minor, Op 61

Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan , great compositions/performances


Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan

Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan: great compositions/performances


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, KV 467 “Elvira Madigan”: great compositions/performances


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, KV 467 “Elvira Madigan

Svetlanov conducts Tchaikovsky – Capriccio italien, Op. 45: great compositions/performances


Svetlanov conducts Tchaikovsky – Capriccio italien, Op. 45

Maria Callas. Sola, perduta, abbandonata. Manon Lescaut. Giacomo Puccini: great compositions/performances


Maria Callas. Sola, perduta, abbandonata. Manon Lescaut. Giacomo Puccini.

Mussorgsky “Pictures at an Exhibition” arr: Stokowski: great compositions/performances


Mussorgsky “Pictures at an Exhibition” arr: Stokowski

Schumann – Symphony n°3, in E flat, Op.97 – Philharmonia Orchestra/ Carlo Maria Giulini: great compositions/performances


Schumann – Symphony n°3 – Philharmonia / Giulini

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 8, in C major “Lutzow” in KV 246: make music part of your life series


Derek Han, piano. Philharmonia Orchestra, Paul Freeman.
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 8 in C major, KV 246
I. Allegro aperto
II. Andante
III. Tempo di menuetto

  • Purchase

    • Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No 8 K.246 “Lützow”, III. Rondeau. Tempo di Minuetto (iTune

It’s hot in LA…what can I say: GLAZUNOV: The Seasons – ‘Summer’ – Philharmonia Orchestra – Yevgeny Svetlanov: great compositions/performances


GLAZUNOV: The Seasons – ‘Summer’ – Philharmonia Orchestra – Yevgeny Svetlanov

Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov (1865-1936 : Russia)

The Seasons (Ballet, Op.67)

Scene III. Summer

Scene Three depicts the height of summer in a wheatfield.
The Spirit of Corn (Kschessinska’s role) dances in the heat of
the day. Naiads carrying blue veils symbolize the coolness of
streams. Satyrs invade the field and attempt to carry off the
spirit of Corn who is protected by Zephyr and the flowers.
From booklet notes

I: Waltz 00:06
II: Barcarole 02:18
III: Variation 05:15
IV: Coda 06:38

Philharmonia Orchestra
Yevgeny Svetlanov, conductor

CDC-7 47847 2
1986 © Angel Records
ADD

Links:
Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexande…
Yevgeny Svetlanov
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yevgeny_…
Philharmonia Orchestra
http://www.philharmonia.co.uk/
Philharmonia Orchestra Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/philharmonia…
Philharmonia Orchestra YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/user/Philharmo…

Aaron Copland. The Red Pony. Dream March and Circus Music. New Philharmonia (make music part of your life series)


Aaron Copland. The Red Pony. Dream March and Circus Music. New Philharmonia

Dream march and circus music from: “The Red Pony” – Suite from the film by the american composer Aaron Copland (1900-1990) performed by the New Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by the composer.

Make Music Part of Your Life Series – Enjoy: Spanish Guitar – Tárrega, Albéniz, Rodrigo


[youtube.com/watch?v=HbkdVpE-VEo]

Spanish Guitar: Tárrega, Albéniz, Rodrigo

The Strings of Time
resound brightly today,
as they’re trying to say,
listen to Me, Soul of Mine.

Part 1 (Guitar Solo)
(00:00) 01. Capricho Arabe (Serenata, Tárrega) [Wulfin Lieske, guitar]
(05:09) 02. Lágrima (Prelude, Tárrega)
(06:46) 03. Maria (Gavotte, Tárrega)
(08:18) 04. Mazurka in G (Tárrega)
(10:04) 05. Recuerdos de Viaje Op.71, I En el Mar (Barcarola, Albéniz) [Julian Byzantine, guitar]
(15:45) 06. Recuerdos de Viaje Op.71, II Asturias (Leyenda, Albéniz)
(22:50) 07. Recuerdos de Viaje Op.71, V Puerta de Tierra (Bolero, Albéniz)
(26:23) 08. Andaluza (Danza Española No. 5, Granados) [Eliot Fisk, guitar]
(30:59) 09. Cancon del Lladre (Llobet) [Wulfin Lieske, guitar]
(32:31) 10. Romance (Anon, arr. Yepes) [Pierre Laniau, guitar]

Part 2 (Guitar and Orchestra)
(35:03) 11. Concierto Madrigal, I Fanfarre (Allegro Marziale, Rodrigo) [Alfonso Moreno & Deborah Mariotti, guitars – London Symphony Orchestra, Enrique Batiz]
(37:03) 12. Concierto Madrigal, II Pastoral (Allegretto, Rodrigo)
(40:44) 13. Concierto Andaluz, I Tiempo de Bolero (Allegro Vivace, Rodrigo) [Alfonso Moreno, Minerva Garibay, Cecilia Lopez & Jesus Ruiz, guitars – Mexican State Symphony Orchestra, Enrique Batiz]
(49:21) 14. Fantasia para un Gentilhombre, IV Canario (Rodrigo) [Ernesto Bitetti, guitar – Philharmonia Orchestra, Antoni Ros-Marba]

Music Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for non-profit purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

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Great Compositions/Performances: Rachmaninov / Artur Rubinstein, 1947: Rhapsody On A Theme Of Paganini, Op. 43 – RCA Vinyl


[youtube.com/watch?v=DpEAlVsMs9I]
From the LP shown above, issued in 1954. The recording you hear was made in 1947. Artur Rubinstein is soloist; Walter Susskind leads the Philharmonia Orchestra.

Note: Rubinstein hits a wrong note at the start of variation 19 (at about16:37). I would be interested to know if this error, for which at the time of this recording there was no technology to correct, has been edited in more recently produced CD versions of this performance.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Muzio Clementi – Minuetto Pastorale


[youtube.com/watch?v=x6Al95SCiFU]

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Muzio Clementi – Minuetto Pastorale

Muzio Clementi (24 January 1752 — 10 March 1832) was a composer, pianist, pedagogue, conductor, music publisher, editor, and piano manufacturer. Born in Rome, he spent most of his life in England.

Work: Minuetto Pastorale

Orchestra: The Philharmonia

Conductor: Francesco d’Avalos

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Make Music Part of your Life Series: Ruggiero RICCI at SAINT-SAËNS Havanaise Op.83 – P.Cao, 1972



Camille SAINT-SAËNS: Havanaise, in E Major Op.83 (1887)
Ruggiero RICCI – Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor (Recorded: Hamburg 1972)
________________________________________­__________
SAINT-SAENS, WORKS FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA:
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…
1) Violin Concerto No.2 in C Major Op.58 (1858)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
2) Violin Concerto No.1 in A Major Op.20 -Allegro (1859)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
3) Introduction and Rondo capriccioso, in A Minor Op.28 (1863)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
4) Romance, in C Major Op.48 (1874)
Philharmonia Hungarica – Reinhard Peters, conductor
5) Violin Concerto No.3 in B minor Op.61 (1880)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
6) Violin Concerto No.4 in G major Op.62 ‘Inachevé’ (Morceau de concert) (1880)
Philharmonia Hungarica – Reinhard Peters, conductor
7) Havanaise, in E Major Op.83 (1887)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
8) Caprice Andalous, in G Major Op.122 (1904)
Philharmonia Hungarica – Pierre Cao, conductor
(Ruggiero Ricci, violin / Hamburg, 1972 – (c)&(p) 1990 by VOX)
________________________________________­__________

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Isaac Stern Plays Dvorak’s Violin Concerto in A minor op. 53, Eugene Ormandy Conduction The Philharmonia Orchestra (the year is 1965)



Great Compositions/Performances: Isaac Stern Plays Dvorak’s Violin Concerto in A minor op. 53, Eugene Ormandy Conduction The Philharmonia Orchestra (the year is 1965)

Isaac Stern

Cover of Isaac SternRelated articles

Eugene Ormandy

Cover of Eugene Ormandy

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FABULOUS COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: Beethoven – Missa Solemnis – Philharmonia / Karajan



Ludwig van Beethoven

Missa Solemnis op.123

Kyrie 0:00
Gloria 11:12
Credo 28:33
Sanctus 50:54
Agnus Dei 01:07:59

Elisabeth Schwarzkopf
Christa Ludwig
Nicolai Gedda
Nicola Zaccaria
Singverein des Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Wien
Philharmonia Orchestra
Herbert von Karajan

Studio recording (11-15.IX.1958)

 Donald Tovey has connected Beethoven to the earlier tradition in a different way:

Not even Bach or Handel can show a greater sense of space and of sonority. There is no earlier choral writing that comes so near to recovering some of the lost secrets of the style of Palestrina. There is no choral and no orchestral writing, earlier or later, that shows a more thrilling sense of the individual colour of every chord, every position, and every doubled third or discord.
 

In this famous portrait of Beethoven byJoseph Karl Stieler, Beethoven can be seen working on the Missa solemnis in D major.

The Missa solemnis in D major, Op. 123 was composed by Ludwig van Beethoven from 1819 to 1823. It was first performed on 7 April 1824 in St. PetersburgRussia, under the auspices of Beethoven’s patron Prince Nikolai Galitzin; an incomplete performance was given in Vienna on 7 May 1824, when the Kyrie, Credo, and Agnus Dei were conducted by the composer.[1] It is generally considered to be one of the composer’s supreme achievements. Together with Bach’s Mass in B minor, it is the most significantMass setting of the common practice period.

Despite critical recognition as one of Beethoven’s great works from the height of his composing career,Missa solemnis has not achieved the same level of popular attention that many of his symphonies and sonatas have enjoyed.[citation needed] Written around the same time as his Ninth Symphony, it is Beethoven’s second setting of the Mass, after his Mass in C, Op. 86.

The Mass is scored for 2 flutes; 2 oboes, 2 clarinets (in A, C, and B♭); 2 bassoonscontrabassoon; 4horns (in D, E♭, B♭ basso, E, and G); 2 trumpets (D, B♭, and C); alto, tenor, and bass trombonetimpani;organ continuo; strings (violins I and II, violascellos, and basses); sopranoaltotenor, and bass soloists; and mixed choir.

Like most Masses, Beethoven’s Missa solemnis is in five movements:

  • Kyrie: Perhaps the most traditional of the Mass movements, the Kyrie is in a traditional ABA’ structure, with stately choral writing in the first movement section and more contrapuntal voice leading in the Christe, which also introduces the four vocal soloists.
  • Gloria: Quickly shifting textures and themes highlight each portion of the Gloria text, in a beginning to the movement that is almost encyclopedic in its exploration of 3/4 time. The movement ends with the first of the work’s two massive fugues, on the text “In gloria Dei patris. Amen”, leading into a recapitulation of the initial Gloria text and music.
  • Credo: One of the most remarkable movements to come from Beethoven’s pen opens with a chord sequence that will be used again in the movement to effect modulations. The Credo, like the Gloria, is an often disorienting, mad rush through the text. The poignant modal harmonies for the “et incarnatus” yield to ever more expressive heights through the “crucifixus”, and into a remarkable, a cappella setting of the “et resurrexit”that is over almost before it has begun. Most notable about the movement, though, is the closing fugue on “et vitam venturi” that includes one of the most difficult passages in the choral repertoire, when the subject returns at doubled tempo for a thrilling conclusion.
    The form of the Credo is divided into four parts: (I) allegro ma non troppo through “descendit de coelis” in B-flat; (II) “Incarnatus est” through”Resurrexit” in D; (III) “Et ascendit” through the Credo recapitulation in F; (IV) Fugue and Coda “et vitam venturi saeculi, amen” in B-flat.
  • Sanctus: Up until the benedictus of the Sanctus, the Missa solemnis is of fairly normal classical proportions. But then, after an orchestral preludio, a solo violin enters in its highest range — representing the Holy Spirit descending to earth — and begins the Missa’s most transcendently beautiful music, in a remarkably long extension of the text.
  • Agnus Dei: A setting of the plea “miserere nobis” (“have mercy on us”) that begins with the men’s voices alone in B minor yields, eventually, to a bright D-major prayer “dona nobis pacem” (“grant us peace”) in a pastoral mode. After some fugal development, it is suddenly and dramatically interrupted by martial sounds (a convention in the 18th century, as in Haydn‘s Missa in tempore belli), but after repeated pleas of “miserere!”,eventually recovers and brings itself to a stately conclusion.

 

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809-1847): Violin Concerto in D Minor



Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy: Violin Concerto in D Minor
ARTHUR GRUMIAUX – Violin

New Philharmonia Orchestra
Conductor:  Jan Krenz,  1972

 

Bizet / Herbert von Karajan, 1958: L’Arlesienne Suite No. 2 – Intermezzo, Minuet, Farandole



Herbert von Karajan (1908-1989) leads the Philharmonia Orchestra in this 1958 recording of the Intermezzo, Minuet and Farandole from the L’Arlesienne Suite No. 2. I created this video from the LP depicted above, issued in 1958 on the Angel label, serial number S. 35618. All images in this video are taken from the LP label (3:47) and LP jacket (10:14), front and reverse. (An image of the reverse side of the jacket appears at the end of the video.)

Movement 2: Intermezzo
Movement 3: Minuet (5:17)
Movement 4: Farandole (9:23)

Movement 1: Pastorale – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-fyBs…

More from this LP:

L’Arlesienne Suite No. 1 – Prelude (1): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZKYXD…

L’Arlesienne Suite No. 1 – Minuet, Allegro giocoso (2):http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFo-A0…

L’Arlesienne Suite No. 1 – Adagietto (3):http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Axb5e…

L’Arlesienne Suite No. 1 – Carillon (4): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3FJJu…

Carmen, Suite No. 1 – Prelude, Act : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-iSqEy…