Tag Archives: New York

biography: Chuck Schumer (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


Chuck Schumer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Chuck Schumer
Charles Schumer official portrait.jpg
United States Senator
from New York
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 3, 1999
Serving with Kirsten Gillibrand
Preceded by Al D’Amato
Chairman of the Senate Rules Committee
In office
January 3, 2009 – January 3, 2015
Preceded by Dianne Feinstein
Succeeded by Roy Blunt
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from New York
In office
January 3, 1981 – January 3, 1999
Preceded by Elizabeth Holtzman
Succeeded by Anthony Weiner
Constituency 16th district 1981–1983
10th district 1983–1993
9th district 1993–1999
Member of the New York State Assembly
from the 45th district
In office
January 1, 1975 – December 31, 1980
Preceded by Stephen J. Solarz
Succeeded by Daniel L. Feldman
Personal details
Born Charles Ellis Schumer
November 23, 1950 (age 64)
Brooklyn, New York City
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Iris Weinshall
Children Jessica
Alison
Alma mater Harvard College (A.B.)
Harvard Law School (J.D.)
Religion Reform Judaism
Website Senate website

Charles Ellis “Chuck” Schumer (/ˈʃmər/; born November 23, 1950) is the senior United States Senator from New York and a member of the Democratic Party. First elected in 1998, he defeated three-term Republican incumbent Al D’Amato by a margin of 55%–44%. Schumer was re-elected in 2004 by a margin of 71%–24% and in 2010 by a margin of 66%–33%.

Before his election to the U.S. Senate, Schumer served in the US House of Representatives from 1981 to 1999, representing New York’s 16th congressional district, later redistricted to the 10th congressional district in 1983 and to the 9th congressional district in 1993. A native of Brooklyn and graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School, he was a three-term member of the New York State Assembly, serving from 1975 to 1980.

Schumer was chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee from 2005 to 2009, in which post he oversaw a total of 14 Democratic gains in the Senate in the 2006 and 2008 elections. He is the third-ranking Democrat in the Senate, behind Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid and Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin, elected Vice Chairman of the Democratic Caucus in the Senate in 2006.[1] In November 2010, he was also chosen to hold the additional role of chairman of the Senate Democratic Policy Committee starting at the opening of the 112th Congress.[2] In 2015, Reid (who is retiring after the 2016 elections) and Durbin endorsed Schumer as the next leader of the Senate Democratic Caucus.[3]

Notable former aides to Schumer include former US congressman Anthony Weiner; and current New York state senator Daniel Squadron and New York State Assembly Members Phil Goldfeder and Victor M. Pichardo.[4][5]

Early life and education

Schumer was born in Brooklyn, the son of Selma (née Rosen) and Abraham Schumer.[6] His family is Jewish,[7] and he is related to comedienne Amy Schumer.[8][9][10] He attended public schools in Brooklyn, scoring a perfect 1600 on the SAT, and graduated as the valedictorian from James Madison High School in 1967.[11] Schumer competed for Madison High on the It’s Academic television quiz show.[12]

He attended Harvard College, where he became interested in politics and campaigned for Eugene McCarthy in 1968.[13] After completing his undergraduate degree, he continued to Harvard Law School, earning his Juris Doctor with honors in 1974. Schumer passed the New York State Bar Exam in early 1975, but never practiced law, entering politics instead.[14]

State Assemblyman and Congressman

 
Chuck Schumer’s Official Congressional Portrait, 1987.

 
Schumer’s district from 1993 to 1999

In 1974, Schumer ran for and was elected to the New York State Assembly, becoming, at age 23, the youngest member of the New York legislature since Theodore Roosevelt. He served three terms, from 1975 to 1980, sitting in the 181st, 182nd and 183rd New York State Legislatures.[15][16][17] He has never lost an election.

In 1980, 16th District Congresswoman Elizabeth Holtzman won the Democratic nomination for the Senate seat of Republican Jacob Javits. Schumer ran for Holtzman’s vacated House seat and won.

He was re-elected eight times from the Brooklyn and Queens-based district, which changed numbers twice in his tenure (it was numbered the 16th from 1981 to 1983, the 10th from 1983 to 1993 and the 9th from 1993). In 1982, as a result of redistricting, Schumer faced a potential matchup with his mentor, veteran Brooklyn congressman Steve Solarz.[18] In preparation, Schumer “set about making friends on Wall Street, tapping the city’s top law firms and securities houses for campaign donations. ‘I told them I looked like I had a very difficult reapportionment fight. If I were to stand a chance of being re-elected, I needed some help,’ he would later tell the Associated Press.”[18]

As a member of the House Judiciary Committee, Schumer was one of four congressional members who oversaw the House investigation (leading the Democratic defense of the Clinton administration),[19] of the Waco siege hearings in 1995.[20]

MORE HERE

picture of today: Douglas ‘Wrong-Way’ Corrigan



Douglas ‘Wrong-Way’ Corrigan

Pilot Douglas Corrigan sought permission from the Civil Aviation Authority to fly across the Atlantic from New York to Ireland, but he was turned down on the grounds that his plane was in poor condition. Corrigan seemed to accept the ruling, but when he took off from New York on July 17, 1938, he banked sharply to the east and headed out over the ocean. Twenty-eight hours and 13 minutes later, Corrigan landed in Ireland, innocently explaining that his 180-degree wrong turn must have been due to a faulty compass. No one believed Corrigan’s explanation, especially the aviation authorities in both Ireland and America, who suspended the rebellious pilot’s license and ordered his aircraft dismantled. Upon his return to America, ‘Wrong-Way’ Corrigan was greeted as a hero. More than a million people lined New York’s Broadway for a ticker-tape parade honoring the man who had flown in the face of authority.

Photo: Library of Congress

The Scripps National Spelling Bee


 

The Scripps National Spelling Bee

The Scripps National Spelling Bee is a highly competitive annual spelling bee run on a non-profit basis by The E. W. Scripps Company, held at a hotel in the Washington, DC, area. The competition came into existence in 1925, and the first winning word was “gladiolus.” The bee is open to the winners of sponsored regional spelling bees held mostly throughout the US, and participants must be in eighth grade or below, or 15 years old or younger. Why is it called a spelling “bee”? More… Discuss

A woman says she was fired after she deleted an app that her boss used to track her, 24/7: — CNNMoney (@CNNMoney) May 13, 2015


 

Picture of the day: Sinking of the Lusitania


Sinking of the Lusitania

During the second year of WWI, the British Cunard ocean liner Lusitania , on a voyage from New York to Liverpool, sank off the coast of Ireland in only 18 minutes after being struck by a torpedo fired by the German U-boat U-20. Of 1,959 passengers and crew, 1,195 died. Of the fatalities, 123 were Americans. Even though the Germans maintained the liner was carrying arms purchased in America to Britain, the sinking of a passenger ship aroused intense anger against the German policy of unrestricted submarine warfare and hastened America’s entrance into the war.

Photo: U.S. Naval Historical Center

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.xSZJtze5.dpuf

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Bernstein, L. – Symphonic Suite from ‘On the Waterfront’ ,great compositions/performances


Bernstein, L. – Symphonic Suite from ‘On the Waterfront’

today’s commemoration/holiday: Douglass Day (2015)


Douglass Day (2015)

Each year on February 14, Frederick Douglass‘s birthday is commemorated with a ceremony at the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site in Washington, DC. The event features speakers on human rights, recitations of excerpts from Douglass’s speeches, music performances, and a wreath-laying ceremony. Activities, including lectures, readings from his works, and film presentations about his life, are also planned in New Bedford, in Rochester, New York, where Douglass’s grave is located, and in many other locations throughout the country. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: US President Bill Clinton Is Acquitted (1999)


US President Bill Clinton Is Acquitted (1999)

In January 1998, President Clinton was questioned in a civil suit charging him with sexual harassment. Before the Grand Jury, he denied having an affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky, which turned out to be untrue. The US House of Representatives impeached Clinton on December 19, 1998, charging him with perjury and obstruction of justice. In 1999, two impeachment counts were tried in the Senate, which voted to acquit Clinton. Who is the only other US President to have been impeached? More… Discuss

quotation: “I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.” Mark Twain


I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

Health officials: N.Y. Amtrak passenger had measles


WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — A college student who rode an Amtrak train through New York to last Sunday has the measles, prompting health officials to warn anyone who came in contact with the patient to watch for signs of the illness.

The Bard College student took the No. 283 Empire line train from Penn Station at 1:20 p.m. Jan. 25. The train made stops in Yonkers and Croton-Harmon before continuing to Poughkeepsie, Rhinecliff and the Albany area.

Bard, a liberal arts college in Dutchess County, has held an immunization clinic for students.

Anyone who might have come into contact with the student and is not fully vaccinated or unsure of their vaccination status is urged to see a doctor, health officials said.

The disease is highly contagious and can take several days after exposure to develop. It causes fever, runny nose, cough and a rash all over the body.

USA TODAY

Measles has infected 84 people in 14 states this year

via Health officials: N.Y. Amtrak passenger had measles.

today’s birthday: Montesquieu (1689)


Montesquieu (1689)

Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de la Brède et de Montesquieu, was a French social and political philosopher whose ideas profoundly influenced European and American political thought, particularly that of America’s founding fathers. He spent 15 years working on his masterpiece, De l’Esprit des lois—On the Spirit of the Laws—an immense comparative analysis of various forms of government comprising more than 600 chapters. What concept did he famously put forth in this work? More… Discuss

Fabbrica di paste #watercolor #pencil #illustration #pasta #Italy — Virginia (@myartpainting)


http://www.virginiart.net/aboutme.html

http://www.virginiart.net/aboutme.html (access this site when you click!)

Google translates:

The Good Things and the Bad Things of Today:

Beautiful things today: the sparrows that seek and found crumbs of food provided just in time, religious songs of women that fill my heart with joy and hope, the elderly gentlemen who smile at me.
The colorful fruits in stalls, the flame of the candle that doesn’t extinguish, greeting without exception everyone who who was here before me my time, the heavenly part of the sky.
The reflection of the sun on the bells, the wind that refreshes the skin, a mother holding the hand of his son, the marijuana that grows wild.
The bleating of goats, the sound of cymbals and drums, children laughing merrily.
A homeless man on the street who loves me!

The bad things of today are those who do not want to see!!!

_Virginia

 

Are you or someone you know a student in New York Public? Cell Phone Ban Lifted for New York Students


Cell Phone Ban Lifted for New York Students

The ban on students having cell phones in New York City’s public schools will soon end, with mayor Bill de Blasio announcing that phone regulation will be up to school principals. Each principal is free to create a policy or use a default one that allows students to bring their phones, so long as they are not used during school hours. The new rules are scheduled to go into effect in March. Currently, many students pay a small fee to leave their phones at a storage location—typically a grocery store or a roaming van—during the school day. More… Discuss

Today’s Picture: January 1, 1892, after two years of construction, the U.S. Immigration Service opened Ellis Island in New York Harbor



On January 1, 1892, after two years of construction, the U.S. Immigration Service opened Ellis Island in New York Harbor, a new facility for ‘processing’ immigrants. Formerly used as a munitions dump and landfill, Ellis Island was designed, its architects claimed, to handle more than 8,000 newcomers a day. Orderly lines funneled bewildered immigrants past doctors and officials who examined them for signs of disease. The physically and mentally ill were refused admittance, forcing thousands of families to make the difficult decision to return home with a relative refused entry or push on without them. A final brusque interview by an immigration official determined whether the newcomers had already been promised jobs. About 80 percent of those who entered Ellis Island received landing cards permitting them to board ferries for New York City. In the 1890s, 75 percent of all immigrants entered the United States through Ellis Island. – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.yUdRynY2.dpuf

Saint of the Day for Wednesday, December 31st, 2014: St. Sylvester


Image of St. Sylvester

St. Sylvester

St. Sylvester, born in Rome, was ordained by Pope St. Marcellinus during the peace that preceded the persecutions of Diocletian. He passed through those days of terror, witnessed the abdication of … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

Saint of the Day for Wednesday, December 24th, 2014: St. Adele


St. Adele

St. Adele, Widow. A daughter of King Dagobert II of Germany, St. Adele became a nun upon the death of her husband, making provisions for her son, the future father of St. Gregory of Utrecht. She … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

News: Pet Piercings, Tattoos Banned in New York


Pet Piercings, Tattoos Banned in New York

The state of New York has passed a law targeting the controversial practices of pet tattooing and piercing that will leave offenders with up to $250 in fines and up to 15 days imprisonment. Although the bill was introduced in 2011—after an online entrepreneur began selling “gothic kittens” with piercings down their spines—it gained traction this year when a Brooklyn man publicized tattooing his pit bull while it was anaesthetized for spleen surgery. The law applies to all types of pets and goes into effect in 2015. More… Discuss


Today’s Holiday

Opalia (2014)

The ancient Roman fertility goddess Ops was known by several different names—among them Rhea, Cybele, Bona Dea, Magna Mater, Thya, and Tellus. She married Saturn and was the mother of Jupiter. She is usually portrayed as a matron, with a loaf of bread in her left hand and her right hand opened as if offering assistance. Not much is known about what actually took place during the Opalia, but it appears that women played an important role in the festival. Because Ops was a fertility goddess, she was often invoked by touching the earth. More… Discuss

this pressed for clarity: A black hole for our best and brightest | The Washington Post


NEW YORK — The thing Deborah Jackson remembers from her first interviews at Goldman Sachs is the slogan. It was stamped on the glass doors of the offices in the investment bank’s headquarters just off Wall Street, the lure of the place in two words, eight syllables: “Uncommon capability.”

Jackson joined Goldman in 1980, fresh from business school and steeped in the workings of government and finance. She found crackerjack colleagues and more business than she could handle. She worked in municipal finance, lending money to local governments, hospitals and nonprofits around the country. She flew first class to scout potential deals — “The issue was, can you really be productive if you’re in a tiny seat in the back?” — and when the time came to seal one, she’d welcome clients and their attorneys to Manhattan’s best restaurants.

The clients would bring their spouses and go to shows.

A black hole for our best and brightest

Wall Street is expanding, and the economy is worse off for it.

via A black hole for our best and brightest | The Washington Post.

Haiku-Papillon, poetic thought by George-B ©The Smudge and other poems Page -My poetry and art collection


Haiku- Papillon, poetic thought by George-B


Surrounding water

Crushes hopes on rocky shores,

freeing the Seventh Wave.

****In Memoriam/Dedicated: Henry Charriere, Author,
        Steve McQueen and  Dustin Hoffman,  Actors

©The Smudge and other poems Page -My poetry and art collection

Liszt Chasse-neige Transcedental Etude #12, Valentina Lisitsa:, great compositions/performances


Liszt Chasse-neige Transcedental Etude #12 Valentina Lisitsa

this pressed for your necessity to know : Congressional staffers walk out to protest killings by police|CBSNEWS


Congressional staffers walk out to protest killings by police

Congressional staffers walk out to protest killings by police (click to read the story at CBSNEWS)

WASHINGTON — Members of Congress, staffers and other Capitol employees stood silently on the House steps Thursday and raised their hands in the air to protest the killing of unarmed black men by police.

They bowed their heads as Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black prayed, “Forgive us when we have failed to lift our voices for those who couldn’t speak or breathe for themselves” — emphasizing “breathe” in reference to Eric Garner, who died after a policeman grabbed him in a chokehold in New York.

“May we not forget that in our history injustice has often been maintained because good people failed to promptly act,” Black said, with well over 100 people standing behind him.

Top 10 Crazy Moments in Sports |Published on Feb 15, 2014/7,659,809 views (is this viral or….bacterial infection? :) )


Top 10 Crazy Moments in Sports

today’s birthday: Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin (1805)


Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin (1805)

Considered the father of modern conjuring, Houdin was a French magician after whom Harry Houdini named himself. Trained as a watchmaker, he was mechanically savvy and used this to his advantage in his act, employing mechanical devices and the newly discovered phenomenon of electromagnetism to create his illusions. Unlike magicians who relied on supernatural explanations for their feats, he openly attributed his magic to natural means. Why did the French government send him to Algeria in 1856? More… Discuss

ASSOCIATED PRESS: Police Chokehold Death


ASSOCIATED PRESS: Police Chokehold Death

Demonstrators march across the Brooklyn Bridge during a protest against a grand jury‘s decision not to indict the police officer involved in the death of Eric Garner, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014, in New York. A grand jury cleared a white New York City police officer Wednesday in the videotaped chokehold death of Garner, an unarmed black man, who had been stopped on suspicion of selling loose, untaxed cigarettes. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

 

More HERE and HERE

Saint of the Day for Thursday, December 4th, 2014: St. John of Damascus


Image of St. John of Damascus

St. John of Damascus

Saint John Damascene has the double honor of being the last but one of the fathers of the Eastern Church, and the greatest of her poets. It is surprising, however, how little that is authentic is … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

Original ‘Little Prince’ illustration to be auctioned


Original Little Prince Illustration to be auctioned

Original ‘Little Prince’ illustration to be auctioned

Original ‘Little Prince’ illustration to be auctioned

Angelina Jordan 8years – What a Difference a Day Make


Angelina Jordan 8years – What a Difference a Day Make

word: huffy


huffy 

Definition: (adjective) Quick to take offense.
Synonyms: touchy
Usage: I tried to give my coworker some advice after the meeting, but she perceived it as criticism, got all huffy, and stormed away. Discuss.

today’s birthday: Emilio Pucci (1914)


Emilio Pucci (1914)

Born into an aristocratic Italian family, Pucci earned his doctorate in political science before a chance meeting on a Swiss ski slope changed the course of his career. In 1947, while on a ski holiday, he crossed paths with a Harper’s Bazaar photographer who was impressed with the skiwear Pucci had designed and got him a spread in the magazine. Within years, Pucci had become an internationally renowned fashion designer. How did his doctorate later come into play in his career? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Ronald DeFeo, Jr., Murders Family in Amityville, New York (1974)


Ronald DeFeo, Jr., Murders Family in Amityville, New York (1974)

After the DeFeo family was discovered murdered in their beds, Ronald DeFeo, Jr.—the family’s only surviving member—was placed under police protection. DeFeo initially told investigators that he believed the murders were a mob hit, but he soon confessed and was convicted of murdering his parents and four siblings. A number of controversies surround the case, especially regarding the possible involvement of DeFeo’s sister Dawn. What best-selling novel and series of films did these events inspire? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Construction of Canadian Pacific Railway Completed (1885)


Construction of Canadian Pacific Railway Completed (1885)

The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) was originally built between eastern Canada and British Columbia, fulfilling a promise made to British Columbia when it agreed to join the Canadian Confederation in 1871. The railway‘s transcontinental passenger service was instrumental in the settlement and development of Western Canada. Today, however, the CPR functions mainly as a freight railway and has US hubs, such as New York City and Chicago. What scandal disrupted the railway’s construction in 1873? More… Discuss

this pressed for your right to know: Number of people being actively monitored for Ebola in New York has tripled to 357 — Los Angeles Times


this pressed for your rght to know: Ebola: NY had jump-start, Dallas had to learn fast (from reacting to preparing…only in reverse!)


https://i1.wp.com/binaryapi.ap.org/4ecae59aec4844d3b3dbe503c0b09cf8/460x.jpg

Ebola: NY had jump-start, Dallas had to learn fast Ebola: NY had jump-start, Dallas had to learn fast
By LAURAN NEERGAARD and DAVID B. CARUSO
Oct. 25, 2014 9:57 AM EDT

via Ebola: NY had jump-start, Dallas had to learn fast

NEW YORK (AP) — Talk about a tale of two cities: A Dallas hospital got a pop quiz in Ebola and made an early mistake. New York got a peek at the answer sheet and was better prepared at the start.

The contrast in handling two Ebola diagnoses highlights how differently cities and hospitals prepare for health emergencies.

“The lesson I would take from New York is you have to practice,” Dr. Amesh Adalja, a representative of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. “Preparedness isn’t something you just make a plan for and put it on the shelf.”

this pressed: BREAKING: NY, New Jersey governors issue quarantine for travelers who had contact with Ebola-infected people in W. Africa. — The Associated Press October 24, 2014


Ryuichi Sakamoto – bibo no aozora: make music part of your life series


Ryuichi Sakamoto – bibo no aozora

Peer Gynt Suites 1 and 2|Incidental music to Henrik Ibsen’s play. (1875, Op. 23), great compositions/performances


Edvard Grieg – Peer Gynt
Suites – 1 and 2

today’s holiday: Black Poetry Day


Black Poetry Day

To honor the contributions African Americans have made to American life and culture, Stanley A. Ransom, of Long Island, New York, proposed Black Poetry Day in 1970. October 17 is the birthdate of Jupiter Hammon, the first African-American poet to publish his own verse. Although it is celebrated all over the state of New York, it has yet to be formally proclaimed a state holiday. Oregon has declared October 17 Black Poetry Day, and schools elsewhere take advantage of the opportunity to encourage African-American students to express their thoughts and feelings through poetry. More… Discuss

this pressed- for your right to know: United Nations|Noam Chomsky Addresses the Press Ahead of Lecture at UN


“identifer:607/607266” : Noam Chomsky Addresses the Press Ahead of Lecture at UNUN Photo/Yubi Hoffmann

 

Noam Chomsky Addresses the Press Ahead of Lecture at UN

Noam Chomsky, Professor Emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), addresses a press conference before his lecture on the prospects for resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, organized by the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People.

14 October 2014

United Nations, New York

Photo # 607266

 

 

 

 

via United Nations Photo.

this pressed for the record: Thousands join ‘weekend of resistance’ as Brown protests expand beyond Ferguson – CSMonitor.com


Protests over the Aug. 9 killing of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, continue to grow as thousands of people from all over the United States descended on greater St. Louis to take part in a weekend-long series of events and marches demanding “justice” for the killing.

Events in what one student called “the epicenter of the movement against police brutality” have transformed since the violence of the immediate aftermath of the shooting into a more sophisticated, but often edgy and raw, strategy where protesters are fanning out to civic events like the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and sporting events, including this weekend’s baseball playoffs featuring the St. Louis Cardinals.

via Thousands join ‘weekend of resistance’ as Brown protests expand beyond Ferguson – CSMonitor.com.

this pressed-pay per page media? yes: Ebola Screenings Begin at New York’s JFK Airport – WSJ


Ebola screenings began on Saturday at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport for travelers coming from the most-affected West African countries, in an effort to curb the spread of the disease in the U.S.About two dozen flights with some passengers from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea were expected to land at JFK on Saturday, according to officials with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which operates the…

Ebola screenings began on Saturday at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport for travelers coming from the most-affected West African countries, in an effort to curb the spread of the disease in the U.S.

About two dozen flights with some passengers from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea were expected to land at JFK on Saturday, according to officials with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which operates the…

via Ebola Screenings Begin at New York’s JFK Airport – WSJ.

Antonín Dvořák – Suite in A Major “American”, Op. 98b, B 190: make music part ofyour life series


The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum


The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim is a modern art museum located in New York City. It is named for its benefactor, art collector Solomon Guggenheim. Founded in the 1930s, it is known for its remarkable circular building designed by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright. The structure resembles a white ribbon spiraling upward and outward in a smooth coil of white concrete. It has no separate floors but instead uses a spiral ramp, realizing Wright’s ideal of a continuous space. Why has Wright’s design been criticized? More… Discuss

Frank Lloyd Wright, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York City, 1942-1959

quotation: Popularity? It is glory’s small change. Victor Hugo


Popularity? It is glory’s small change.

Victor Hugo (1802-1885) Discuss

Franz Schubert – “Andantino with Variations” – Klavierduo Burshtin / Kharmats: make music part of your life series


Franz Schubert – “Andantino with Variations” – Klavierduo Burshtin / Kharmats

this day in the yesteryear: The Honeymooners Premiers on CBS (1955)


The Honeymooners Premiers on CBS (1955)

The Honeymooners was a short-lived American sitcom based on sketches by comedian Jackie Gleason. It starred Gleason and Audrey Meadows as a struggling working class couple in New York—a drastic departure from other popular comedies of the era that depicted their characters in comfortable, middle-class, suburban environments. Though The Honeymooners was cancelled after just 39 episodes, it has been aired for decades in syndication. What animated TV series did Gleason’s show inspire? More… Discuss

Maafa Commemoration


Maafa Commemoration

The Maafa Commemoration is an annual remembrance of the Transatlantic Slave Trade and the experience of Middle Passage. The commemoration, held at the St. Paul Community Baptist Church in Brooklyn, New York, centers around a dramatic presentation put on by the church’s drama ministry. “The Maafa Suite … A Healing Journey” depicts the history of African Americans, from Africa to the Jim Crow South. Other events during the week include lectures, worship services, Maafa museum tours, and special activities for senior citizens and young people. More…

this pressed: Why Do Democrats Keep Trying to Ban Guns That Look Scary, Not the Guns That Kill the Most People? – ProPublica


Why Do Democrats Keep Trying to Ban Guns That Look Scary, Not the Guns That Kill the Most People? – ProPublica.

LABOR DAY (from Wikipedia)


LABOR DAY

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Labor Day in the United States is a holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It is a celebration of the American labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of their country.

Labor Day was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, who organized the first parade in New York City. After the Haymarket Massacre, which occurred in Chicago on May 4, 1886, U.S. President Grover Cleveland feared that commemorating Labor Day on May 1 could become an opportunity to commemorate the affair. Thus, in 1887, it was established as an official holiday in September to support the Labor Day that the Knights favored.[1]

The equivalent holiday in Canada, Labour Day, is also celebrated on the first Monday of September. In many other countries (more than 80 worldwide), “Labour Day” is synonymous with, or linked with, International Workers’ Day, which occurs on May 1.

History

In 1882, Matthew Maguire, a machinist, first proposed the holiday while serving as secretary of the CLU (Central Labor Union) of New York.[2] Others argue that it was first proposed by Peter J. McGuire of the American Federation of Labor in May 1882,[3] after witnessing the annual labour festival held in Toronto, Canada.[4] Oregon was the first state to make it a holiday on February 21, 1887. By the time it became a federal holiday in 1894, thirty states officially celebrated Labor Day.[3]

Following the deaths of a number of workers at the hands of the U.S. military and U.S. Marshals during the Pullman Strike, the United States Congress unanimously voted to approve rush legislation that made Labor Day a national holiday; President Grover Cleveland signed it into law a mere six days after the end of the strike.[5] The September date originally chosen by the CLU of New York and observed by many of the nation’s trade unions for the past several years was selected rather than the more widespread International Workers’ Day because Cleveland was concerned that observance of the latter would be associated with the nascent Communist, Syndicalist and Anarchist movements that, though distinct from one another, had rallied to commemorate the Haymarket Affair in International Workers’ Day.[6] All U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and the territories have made it a statutory holiday.

Labor Day
Labor Day New York 1882.jpg

Labor Day Parade, Union Square, New York, 1882
Observed by United States
Type Federal Holiday (federal government, DC and U.S. Territories); and State Holiday (in all 50 U.S. States)
Celebrations Parades, barbecues
Date First Monday in September
2013 date September 2
2014 date September 1
2015 date September 7
2016 date September 5
Frequency annual
Related to Labour Day

today’s birthday: Charlie Parker (1920) (listen to “Summertime”)


Charlie Parker (1920)

Charlie “Bird” Parker was an American saxophonist and composer. Along with trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, Parker was a leader of the bop movement in jazz. His brilliant improvisations were noted for their power and beauty. Sadly, his heroin addiction was legendary as well. He had a drug-induced nervous breakdown in 1946 and saw his cabaret card—which allowed him to play in New York clubs—revoked by the police in 1951. When he died four years later, at age 34, how old did the coroner think he was? More… Discuss

Charlie Parker – Summertime (Jazz Instrumental)