Tag Archives: Pennsylvania

this day in the yesteryear: Johnstown Flood Kills 2,209 (1889)


Johnstown Flood Kills 2,209 (1889)

When the South Fork Dam near Johnstown, Pennsylvania, collapsed after several days of heavy rains, it sent 20 million tons (18.1 million cubic meters) of water cascading downriver at speeds of 20–40 mph (30–60 km/h). Less than an hour after the breach, a 30-foot (9-m) wall of water smashed into Johnstown, killing more than 2,200 people. The American Red Cross’s response was one of its first major disaster relief efforts. Why did some blame the South Fork Fishing and Hunting Club for the tragedy? More… Discuss

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Rick Santorum, Catholic and Republican, to run for US president :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


 

Rick Santorum. Credit: Gage Skidmore via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0).

Pittsburgh, Pa., May 28, 2015 / 03:15 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Second-time presidential candidate Rick Santorum announced his campaign for the U.S. presidency on Wednesday, standing behind his goals to shrink the government, heal the middle class, and focus on social issues, while honing in on his image as a “blue collar conservative.”

“I am proud to stand here among you and for you, the American workers who have sacrificed so much, to announce that I am running for president of the United States,” Santorum stated May 27 in his home state of Pennsylvania.

Santorum will try to appeal to Catholic voters in the 2016 race, although he is among two other Republican contenders with a Catholic affiliation – Jeb Bush, a convert from Episcopalianism, and Marco Rubio.

Santorum’s 2012 campaign for president bolstered his transparency on faith, revealing his belief that God and the importance of religion are pivotal in American democracy. The former U.S. Senator has made it clear over the years that he is devoted to his faith, and that the Church has helped shape some of his political stances.

“I am proud of being Catholic. I’m proud of the teachings of the Church,” Santorum told CNA in 2011, upholding the belief that faith and reason go hand in hand.

“When the reason is right and the faith is true, they end up in the same place,” Santorum continued.

The New York Times called Santorum the “boldest candidate in the race” because of his stance opposing abortion and same-sex marriage, making him stand apart from what could be a dozen republican runners.

During his two terms as a U.S. Senator, Santorum worked resolutely to ban partial-birth abortion and continues to oppose the practice. He also told CNA that the “faith teaches very clearly that life is life at the moment of conception.”

Santorum also defended religious-based organizations and helped them receive more assistance during his time as a senator in the 1996 welfare overhaul. He has also spoken out against homosexual acts and supports marriage between one man and one woman, publicly supporting the Defense of Marriage Act of 1996.

Although Santorum admitted on NBC earlier in the year that he had spoken rashly about some sensitive issues during his 2012 campaign, but he is still resolved to speak openly about the importance of family and traditional values.

The former senator, age 57, joins an already crowded race, but his history of winning 11 states against Mitt Romney in the 2012 Republican primaries could prove helpful in the continuously brimming bids.

Although recent polls place him 10th among his fellow Republicans, Santorum will work to make his way towards the early debates in August, pushing his themes of restoring traditional American values and defence against the country’s enemies.

Santorum spoke boldly this week about the impending threat of radical Islam, saying he has been dubbed as an enemy by the Islamic State in one of their English-language magazines. Nevertheless, Santorum believes America should be wary of the brewing storm that extremist Islam may pose.

Other candidates for the Republican nomination include former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee, Texas senator Ted Cruz, and Ben Carson, a retired surgeon.

Tags: 2016 Presidential Race

via Rick Santorum, Catholic and Republican, to run for US president :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

today’s holiday: Mother’s Day (United States)


Mother’s Day (United States)

The setting aside of a day each year to honor mothers was the suggestion of Anna M. Jarvis of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, whose own mother had died on May 9, 1906. She held a memorial service and asked those attending to wear white carnations—a gesture that soon became a tradition. By 1914, President Woodrow Wilson had proclaimed a national day in honor of mothers, and some people still wear carnations on the second Sunday in May—pink or red for mothers who are living and white for those who have died. More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Sunday, May 3rd, 2015: St. James the Lesser


Image of St. James the Lesser

St. James the Lesser

St. James the Less, the author of the first Catholic Epistle, was the son of Alphaeus of Cleophas. His mother Mary was either a sister or a close relative of the Blessed Virgin, and for that reason, … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

Andrew Wyeth


Andrew Wyeth

Wyeth is an American painter whose work has been enormously popular and critically acclaimed since his first one-man show in 1937. His principal subjects are the people of Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, and Cushing, Maine, portrayed in a meticulous naturalistic style. The best-known of Wyeth’s paintings, Christina’s World (1948), hangs at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. What are his “Helga” pictures, and why did they generate a considerable amount of media buzz? More… Discuss

How to meditate for beginners at home (www.ishakriya.com for FULL guided meditation technique)


How to meditate for beginners at home (www.ishakriya.com for FULL guided meditation technique)

News: Pet Piercings, Tattoos Banned in New York


Pet Piercings, Tattoos Banned in New York

The state of New York has passed a law targeting the controversial practices of pet tattooing and piercing that will leave offenders with up to $250 in fines and up to 15 days imprisonment. Although the bill was introduced in 2011—after an online entrepreneur began selling “gothic kittens” with piercings down their spines—it gained traction this year when a Brooklyn man publicized tattooing his pit bull while it was anaesthetized for spleen surgery. The law applies to all types of pets and goes into effect in 2015. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: George Washington Resigns as Commander-in-Chief (1783)


George Washington Resigns as Commander-in-Chief (1783)

After demonstrating exemplary leadership as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolution, George Washington resigned his commission and retired to Mount Vernon, Virginia. By resigning his military post, Washington established the important precedent that civilian-elected officials possess ultimate authority over the armed forces. After a brief retirement, he was elected the country’s first president. Why was he given a posthumous military promotion in 1976? More… Discuss

Musical Jewels: Glenn Gould talks about J S Bach: make music part of your life series (i#make music part of your life series)


Glenn Gould talks about J S Bach

J. S. Bach, Sonata No. 1 in G minor, BWV 1001 – Ana Vidovich (“ANA VIDOVIC – GUITAR VIRTUOSO”, 2006): great compositions/performances


J. S. Bach, Sonata No. 1 in G minor, BWV 1001 – Ana Vidovich

this day in the yesteryear: Kecksburg UFO Incident (1965)


Kecksburg UFO Incident (1965)

Many believe that the large fireball observed in the sky above Ontario, Canada, and at least six US states in 1965 was nothing more than a passing meteor. However, some witnesses in the small town of Kecksburg, Pennsylvania, claim a car-sized, acorn-shaped object with hieroglyphic-like markings crashed in a nearby wood and was then carted off by the military. Government officials long denied these allegations, but 40 years later, in 2005, NASA made what admission regarding the suspicious object? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteyear: Abraham Lincoln Delivers Gettysburg Address (1863)


 

Abraham Lincoln Delivers Gettysburg Address (1863)

The Gettysburg Address, one of the most quoted speeches in US history, was delivered by President Abraham Lincoln at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and half months after the famous battle fought there. In about two minutes, Lincoln’s address redefined the American Civil War as not just a struggle for the Union, but as “a new birth of freedom” for the US and its people. Lincoln’s address has drawn comparisons to what ancient speech? More… Discuss

 

this pressed: Golden Gate Bridge pedestrian poll proposal survives first test— SFGate (@SFGate)


todady’s holiday: Patriot Day


Patriot Day

Patriot Day in the United States commemorates the anniversary of the terrorist attacks that took place on September 11, 2001, in New York City, Washington, DC, and in the skies above Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Each year, the president proclaims a day of national observance in memory of the more than 2,700 people who lost their lives in the attacks. Throughout the nation, flags are flown at half-staff, and a moment of silence is observed at 8:46 AM, Eastern time, the exact moment the first plane flew into the North Tower of the World Trade Center. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: 9/11 Terrorist Attacks (2001)


9/11 Terrorist Attacks (2001)

On September 11, 2001, 19 Al-Qaeda terrorists hijacked four commercial airplanes. They crashed two planes into the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers in New York City and flew a third into the Pentagon building in Virginia. Passengers on the fourth flight attempted to retake control of the aircraft, but it crashed in a Pennsylvania field. The devastating terrorist attacks of 9/11 were responsible for 2,996 deaths and countless more injuries. What were the environmental consequences of 9/11? More… Discuss

Politically Correct: Noam Chomsky


Noam Chomsky

 
Chomsky” redirects here. For other uses, see Chomsky (disambiguation).
Noam Chomsky
Chomsky.jpg

On a visit to Vancouver, British Columbia in 2004
Born December 7, 1928 (age 85)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Other names Avram Noam Chomsky
Alma mater University of Pennsylvania (B.A.) 1949, (M.A.) 1951, (Ph.D.) 1955
 
Era 20th / 21st-century philosophy
Region Western philosophy
School Generative linguistics, Analytic philosophy
Institutions MIT (1955–present)
Main interests Linguistics ·
Metalinguistics
Psychology
Philosophy of language
Philosophy of mind
Politics · Ethics
Notable ideas
Influences
Influenced

Avram Noam Chomsky (/ˈnm ˈɒmski/; born December 7, 1928) is an American linguist, philosopher,[20][21] cognitive scientist, logician,[22][23][24] political commentator and activist. Sometimes described as the “father of modern linguistics”,[25][26] Chomsky is also a major figure in analytic philosophy.[20] He has spent most of his career at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he is currently Professor Emeritus, and has authored over 100 books. He has been described as a prominent cultural figure, and was voted the “world’s top public intellectual” in a 2005 poll.[27]

Born to a middle-class Ashkenazi Jewish family in Philadelphia, Chomsky developed an early interest in anarchism from relatives in New York City. He later undertook studies in linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania, where he obtained his BA, MA, and PhD, while from 1951 to 1955 he was appointed to Harvard University‘s Society of Fellows. In 1955 he began work at MIT, soon becoming a significant figure in the field of linguistics for his publications and lectures on the subject. He is credited as the creator or co-creator of the Chomsky hierarchy, the universal grammar theory, and the Chomsky–Schützenberger theorem. Chomsky also played a major role in the decline of behaviorism, and was especially critical of the work of B.F. Skinner.[28][29] In 1967 he gained public attention for his vocal opposition to U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, in part through his essay The Responsibility of Intellectuals, and came to be associated with the New Left while being arrested on multiple occasions for his anti-war activism. While expanding his work in linguistics over subsequent decades, he also developed the propaganda model of media criticism with Edward S. Herman. Following his retirement from active teaching, he has continued his vocal public activism, praising the Occupy movement for example.

Chomsky has been a highly influential academic figure throughout his career, and was cited within the field of Arts and Humanities more often than any other living scholar between 1980 and 1992. He was also the eighth most cited scholar overall within the Arts and Humanities Citation Index during the same period.[30][31][32][33] His work has influenced fields such as artificial intelligence, cognitive science, computer science, logic, mathematics, music theory and analysis, political science, programming language theory and psychology.[32][33][34][35][36] Chomsky continues to be well known as a political activist, and a leading critic of U.S. foreign policy, state capitalism, and the mainstream news media. Ideologically, he aligns himself with anarcho-syndicalism and libertarian socialism.[37]

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this day in the yesteryear: Battle of Gettysburg Begins (1863)


Battle of Gettysburg Begins (1863)

The Battle of Gettysburg was the bloodiest battle of the American Civil War, resulting in some 50,000 casualties in three days. It took place in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and signaled a turning of the tide in favor of the Union. The site is now a national cemetery, at whose dedication on November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address. Seamstress Ginnie Wade was the only documented civilian casualty of the battle. How did she die? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Frank Lloyd Wright (1867): Widely considered the greatest American architect


Frank Lloyd Wright (1867)

Widely considered the greatest American architect, Wright championed the use of open planning as well https://i0.wp.com/img.weburbanist.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/movie-houses-north-by-northwest-vandamm.jpgas “organic architecture,” a design philosophy that promotes harmony between building and environment. His masterpieces include New York City’s iconic Guggenheim Museum and “Fallingwater,” a breathtaking Pennsylvania house that is cantilevered over a waterfall, with its balconies and terraces seemingly suspended in midair. How many people were murdered at Wright’s home, Taliesin, in 1914? More… Discuss

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Today’s Birthday: JOHNNY APPLESEED (1774)


Johnny Appleseed (1774)

Born John Chapman, Johnny Appleseed was an American folk hero known for planting apple trees. Around 1800, he traveled from Pennsylvania, where he had sold or given saplings and apple seeds to families migrating westward, to present-day Ohio, sewing apple seeds as he went. For more than 40 years, he continued to wander up and down Ohio, Indiana, and Pennsylvania, pruning and caring for his forest nurseries and helping hundreds of settlers to establish orchards. Do any of his trees still exist? More… Discuss