Tag Archives: American Revolution

today’s birthday: Martha Washington (1731)


Martha Washington (1731)

Martha Washington was the wife of first US president George Washington. They married in 1759, nearly two years after the death of her first husband, Daniel Parke Custis. During the American Revolution, she spent winters in army camps with her husband and organized a women’s sewing circle to mend clothes for the troops. Although the title was not coined until after her death, she is considered the first “First Lady” of the US. She is also the only woman whose portrait has appeared on what? More… Discuss

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Joan of Arc – Jennifer Warnes and Leonard Cohen


Eileen’s Videos (Adamfulgence)

The story of Joan of Arc is one of the most wonderful stories in the history of any nation of Europe. In the hour of France’s need, when she was being conquered by English armies, when her forces were so divided by civil war that it seemed as if there were no true Frenchmen, but that every lord and district were for themselves, when she had no recognized king, but only an uncrowned Dauphin…….in this hour of her need there appeared for France a Maiden, a deliverer. 

Joan died a cruel death, but the work which she had begun in France did not die with her. She had united the French and they did not fall apart again into quarrelsome factions. King Charles showed a new spirit as he began his reign. Even through the dangers of war he took time to unite his nobles and keep them in order under him. The English were driven out by this newly roused French nation. The Hundred Years’ War was ended, and a peace was concluded by which France was left free within her own provinces, untroubled by foreigners.

Many movies, books, poems, songs have been written on the subject of Joan of Arc. In this video, the Leonard Cohen song, “Joan of Arc” is featured as sung by Jennifer Warnes with several images that are hopefully interwoven to reflect a variety of Joan of Arc facets in the past and in our present day. I chose to focus on the face of Renée Maria Falconetti from the 1928 movie “La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc” -The director, Dreyer, wrote in his “Thoughts on My Craft”, “Nothing in the world can be compared to the human face. It is a land one can never tire of exploring”. Dreyer’s film was a visionary work of art which has to be seen to be appreciated. But, Falconetti’s performance was so intense for her that she suffered a mental breakdown after the filming.

Songs, poems, symbols are all able to carry multiple messages, depending on who is interpreting them (or when in their life they are doing the interpreting). I have chosen to interpret the fire as being God (Jesus for Joan). Some have said that they saw the fire as the Devil. Not I.

Best viewed at 720p on a full screen.

Now the flames they followed Joan of arc
As she came riding through the dark;
No moon to keep her armour bright,
No man to get her through this very smoky night.
She said, I’m tired of the war,
I want the kind of work I had before,
A wedding dress or something white
To wear upon my swollen appetite.Well, I’m glad to hear you talk this way,
You know I’ve watched you riding every day
And something in me yearns to win
Such a cold and lonesome heroine.
And who are you? she sternly spoke
To the one beneath the smoke.
Why, I’m fire, he replied,
And I love your solitude, I love your pride.Then fire, make your body cold,
I’m going to give you mine to hold,
Saying this she climbed inside
To be his one, to be his only bride.
And deep into his fiery heart
He took the dust of Joan of arc,
And high above the wedding guests
He hung the ashes of her wedding dress.

It was deep into his fiery heart
He took the dust of Joan of arc,
And then she clearly understood
If he was fire, oh then she must be wood.
I saw her wince, I saw her cry,
I saw the glory in her eye.
Myself I long for love and light,
But must it come so cruel, and oh so bright?

 Read more at  Here…
 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Jennifer Warnes
Birth name Jennifer Jean Warnes
Born March 3, 1947 (age 65)
Origin Anaheim, CaliforniaUnited States
Genres PopCountryRhythm and BluesOpera
Occupations SingerSongwriterArranger,Record producer Concert performer, Television performer
Years active 1967–present (singer, songwriter, arranger and producer)
Labels CISCO, BoxStar Impex Records, Shout Factory
Associated acts Bill MedleyJoe Cocker,Leonard CohenRandy Newman
Website Official website

Jennifer Jean Warnes (born March 3, 1947) is an American singer, songwriter, arranger, and record producer. She is known for her interpretations of compositions written by herself and many others as well as an extensive playlist as a vocalist on movie soundtracks. She is a close friend of and collaborator with Canadian singer-songwriter and poet, Leonard Cohen.

Between 1979 and 1987, Warnes surpassed Frank Sinatra as the vocalist performing the most songs to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song (four times) and to win an Academy Award for Best Original Song (three times). Her biggest hits include “Up Where We Belong” (a duet with Joe Cocker from the 1982 film, An Officer and a Gentleman) and “(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life” (a duet with Bill Medleyfrom the 1987 film, Dirty Dancing).

today’s birthday: Frederick Russell Burnham (1861)


Frederick Russell Burnham (1861)

Burnham was an American adventurer whose outdoorsmanship helped inspire the founding of the international scout movement. He was born on an Indian reservation to a missionary family and became a horseback messenger for Western Union Telegraph Company at age 13 and soon after a scout and tracker. After two decades of ranging in the Southwest and Mexico, he moved to Africa to become the British army’s chief of scouts during the Boer War. His tracking skills earned him what nickname in Africa? More… Discuss

picture of the day: The Swedish Nightengale



The Swedish Nightengale

Swedish-born Jenny Lind (1820-1887), the greatest operatic and concert soprano of her age, was already the toast of Europe when she was approached by American showman P.T. Barnum in 1847. Even before hearing her voice, Barnum signed the ‘Swedish Nightingale‘ for 150 American concerts at the enormous sum of $150,000. With the help of Barnum’s matchless marketing, Jenny Lind mania swept America, with crowds of the rich and famous and ordinary music lovers alike falling at her feet. This 1850 daguerreotype of Miss Lind was taken by Matthew Brady.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.WIyDvPBO.dpuf

today’s birthday Olympe de Gouges (1748)


Olympe de Gouges (1748)

Born Marie Gouze, de Gouges was a French author whose feminist writings during the French Revolution demanded the same rights for French women that French men were demanding. In 1791, alarmed that the new constitution did not address woman’s suffrage, she wrote Declaration of the Rights of Woman and the Female Citizen, challenging the practice of male authority and the notion of male-female inequality. Why was she executed by guillotine during the Reign of Terror? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: The Gnadenhütten Massacre (1782)


The Gnadenhütten Massacre (1782)

During the American Revolution, the Lenape, or Delaware, group of Native Americans found itself divided on the issue of which side, if any, to take in the conflict. Some members elected to fight against the Americans, while others—particularly Christian converts—remained neutral. In 1782, an American militia seeking revenge for Native American raids on frontier settlements killed 96 Christian Delawares in Gnadenhütten, Ohio. What military leader was later killed in retaliation for Gnadenhütten? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Ratification Day (2015)


Ratification Day (2015)

The Treaty of Paris was signed on September 3, 1783, and was ratified on January 14, 1784, officially ending the American Revolution. The Old Senate Chamber in the Maryland State House at Annapolis has been preserved exactly as it was when the ratification took place, and, on its anniversary, the flag of 1784—with 12 stars in a circle and the 13th in the center—flies over the State House and many other buildings in Annapolis. The ceremony that takes place inside varies from year to year, but it often revolves around a particular aspect of the original event. More… Discuss

image of the day: EUZICASA Audiobook Stand : Thomas Paine Publishes Common Sense (audiobook here-close caption in several languages)



Thomas Paine Publishes Common Sense
On January 9, 1776, propagandist Thomas Paine anonymously published Common Sense, advocating an immediate declaration of independence from Britain. An instant bestseller in both the colonies and in Britain, Paine baldly stated that King George III was a tyrant and that Americans should shed any sentimental attachment to the monarchy. America, he argued, had a moral obligation to reject monarchy. ‘O! ye that love mankind! Ye that dare opposed not only the tyranny but the tyrant, stand forth! Every spot of the Old World is overrun with oppression. Freedom hath been hunted around the globe…. O! receive the fugitive and prepare in time an asylum for mankind,’ he urged. Within a few years, a land with a population of 2.5 million had bought 500,000 copies of Paine’s stirring call for independence.

(Image: Library of Congress)

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.qG4LItb2.dpuf

Common Sense Audiobook by Thomas Paine (February 4, 1776)

this day in the yesteryear: Treaty of Ghent Signed (1814)


Treaty of Ghent Signed (1814)

The Treaty of Ghent ended the War of 1812 between the US and the UK. Although the treaty was signed in December, fighting continued for several weeks because it took time for news of the agreement to reach North America. The treaty essentially restored prewar borders and failed to deal with the matters of neutral rights and impressment that were the ostensible causes of the conflict. It did, however, included certain progressive terms that called for the signatories to put a stop to what? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: George Washington Resigns as Commander-in-Chief (1783)


George Washington Resigns as Commander-in-Chief (1783)

After demonstrating exemplary leadership as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolution, George Washington resigned his commission and retired to Mount Vernon, Virginia. By resigning his military post, Washington established the important precedent that civilian-elected officials possess ultimate authority over the armed forces. After a brief retirement, he was elected the country’s first president. Why was he given a posthumous military promotion in 1976? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Eli Whitney (1765)


Eli Whitney (1765)

Whitney was the inventor of the cotton gin, a mechanical device that separates cotton fiber from its seeds. His invention, which had immense economic and social ramifications, brought great wealth to many others, but little to Whitney himself. In 1798, he built a firearms factory, and his products were some of the first to have standardized, interchangeable parts. Why did Whitney’s ginning company go out of business only three years after he received his cotton gin patent? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Marquis de Lafayette (1757)


Marquis de Lafayette (1757)

Lafayette was a French aristocrat most famous for his participation in the American and French revolutions. He fought with distinction in the American Revolution, becoming a close friend of George Washington. Upon returning to France, “the Hero of Two Worlds” turned his attentions to his home country, helping draft the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen and pushing for a constitutional monarchy. Lafayette is one of only seven people to have been accorded what honor by the US? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: The Statue of Liberty’s Cornerstone Is Laid (1884)


The Statue of Liberty’s Cornerstone Is Laid (1884)

The Statue of Liberty—officially “Liberty Enlightening the World”—is located on Liberty Island in New York Harbor. It was a gift to the US from France to commemorate France’s alliance with the colonies during the American Revolution. Though it is now an iconic landmark, many forget that “Lady Liberty” also served as a functioning lighthouse from 1886 to 1902. Designed by French sculptor F.A. Bartholdi, the statue depicts Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom. Who served as Bartholdi’s model? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Henry Knox (1750)


Henry Knox (1750)

A bookseller, Knox became active in the colonial militia in the lead-up to the American Revolution. Upon the outbreak of war with England, he volunteered for the revolutionary forces and soon proved himself a capable tactician and leader. He was so highly regarded that he was chosen to succeed George Washington as commander of the army at the war’s end and later served as the first US secretary of war. What did Knox accidentally swallow that caused an infection that claimed his life? More… Discuss

this day in the yersteryear: The Bahamas Gain Independence from the British Commonwealth (1973)


 

The Bahamas Gain Independence from the British Commonwealth (1973)

 

English: Reception of the American Loyalists b...

English: Reception of the American Loyalists by Great Britain in the Year 1783. Engraving by H. Moses after Benjamin West. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Bahama Islands became a British colony in the 18th century, when they were a haven for pirates such as Blackbeard. After the American Revolution, many Loyalists settled there, bringing slaves to labor on cotton plantations. Later, during the prohibition era in the US, the Bahamas became a base for rum-running. It was not until 1973 that the islands became a sovereign state within the Commonwealth of Nations. What happened to the native tribe that Columbus first encountered there in 1492? More… Discuss

 

today’s holiday: Bunker Hill Day


Bunker Hill Day

Observed primarily in Boston, Massachusetts, Bunker Hill Day commemorates the Revolutionary War battle of June 1775 between 2,200 British troops and half that number of Americans. It was, in fact, Breed’s Hill that was fortified, not nearby Bunker Hill, and that is where the British attacked the rebels three times. Although the Americans were driven from their fortification and lost some 450 men, it has always been looked upon as one of the great heroic battles of the Revolution. A 221-foot granite obelisk in Charlestown, north of Boston, marks the site of battle. More… Discuss

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: WASHINGTON BECOMES FIRST ELECTED US PRESIDENT (1789)


 

Washington Gold

Washington Gold (Photo credit: Peter Liu Photography)

Washington Becomes First Elected US President (1789)

Washington, who served as commander-in-chief of the Continental army in the American Revolution, was elected the first President of the US after the adoption of the Constitution. His two-term administration was marked by the establishment of a number of key American institutions that continue to operate today. Because of his central role in the founding of the US, Washington is often called the “Father of His Country.” What are five places or institutions that are named after him?More… Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: RATIFICATION DAY


Ratification Day

Though most people associate the end of the American Revolution with the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown, Virginia, in 1781, the war was not officially ended until the Treaty of Paris was ratified on January 14, 1784. The Old Senate Chamber in the Maryland State House at Annapolis has been preserved exactly as it was when the ratification took place. On Ratification Day, the ceremony that takes place inside varies from year to year, but it often revolves around a particular aspect of the original event. More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: MANUELA SÁENZ (1797)


Manuela Sáenz (1797)

Until recently, Sáenz’s contributions to the South American independence movement were largely overlooked. For eight years, she dedicated herself to the cause—and to her lover, revolutionary leader Simón Bolívar, whom she once saved from an assassination attempt. For that, he nicknamed her Libertadora del Libertador, or Liberator of the Liberator. Bolívar’s death in 1830 left Sáenz vulnerable to his opponents, and she was exiled and left destitute. What honor was she accorded in 2010? More…Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: JOHN PAUL JONES (1747)


John Paul Jones (1747)

One of the greatest heroes of the US Navy, Jones emigrated from Scotland at the start of the American Revolution. In 1779, while commanding the Bonhomme Richard, he engaged the British Serapis in battle. With his ship on fire and sinking, he answered a call to surrender by saying, “I have not yet begun to fight!” Eventually, the crew of the badly damaged Serapis surrendered, and Jones and his men boarded her. Where were Jones’s remains—lost for over a century—found in 1905? More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: NATHAN HALE IS HANGED FOR SPYING (1776)


 

Nathan Hale Is Hanged for Spying (1776)

A young teacher at the start of the American Revolution, Hale joined the Continental Army and volunteered for the dangerous mission of spying on British forces. The inexperienced 21-year-old managed to penetrate the British lines but was captured and hanged without trial. His last words, reported as, “I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country,” became a symbol of the Revolutionary spirit. Yet, some question whether these were his exact words. What might he have actually said? More…Discuss

 

This Day in History: Statue of Liberty Is Dedicated (1886)


Statue of Liberty Is Dedicated (1886)

The Statue of Liberty, originally known as Liberty Enlightening the World, was proposed by French historian Édouard Laboulaye in 1865 to commemorate the alliance of France with the American colonies during the American Revolution. Designed by French sculptor F. A. Bartholdi, the statue is 152 ft (46 m) high and is possibly the tallest metal statue ever made. It was shipped to New York in 1885, assembled, and dedicated in 1886. What New York tradition originated during the dedication? More… Discuss